Highly Efficient Strengthening of Local Load Introduction Areas of Engineering Wood Structures Using Polymer Concrete Grouting

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue691
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
H├Ądicke, Wolfram
Kaestner, Martin
Rautenstrauch, Karl
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Photogrammetry
polymer concrete
Reinforcement
Self-Tapping Screws
Load Carrying Capacity
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The development of wide-span structures occurs high reaction forces at the bearings. The load-bearing capacity is strongly limited, because of the low compression strength and stiffness of wood perpendicular to the grain. One common possibility of strengthening the support is the application of self-tapping screws [1],[2]. Subject of the presented research project is the study of a new, practicable and quite easy to manage type of reinforcement for load transfer areas. To increase the load carrying capacity drill holes and block shaped areas filled with polymer concrete are inserted into the timber. Due to the rigid bond between wood and polymer concrete as well as a geometrical adaption to the stress distribution, it is possible to increase the load carrying capacity and the compressive stiffness significantly compared to conventional reinforcement by self-tapping screws. First inchoate versions of bearing reinforcement have been designed and used very successfully as part of another research project to increase the bending capacity of glulam beams by hybrid material composites [3],[4]. Figure 1 shows one example of the tested designs. The diagram in Figure 2 illustrates the increase of the transversal load bearing capacity compared to FE-simulation of the same member without reinforcement.
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Resource Link
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