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Lateral Load Resisting Systems for Engineered Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2637
Year of Publication
2009
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2009
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The main sources of lateral loads on buildings are either strong winds or earthquakes. These lateral forces are resisted by the buildings’ Lateral Load Resisting Systems (LLRSs). Adequate design of these systems is of paramount importance for the structural behaviour in general. Basic procedures for design of buildings subjected to lateral loads are provided in national and international model building codes. Additional lateral load design provisions can be found in national and international material design standards. The seismic and wind design provisions for engineered wood structures in Canada need to be enhanced to be compatible with those available for other materials such as steel and concrete. Such design provisions are of vital importance for ensuring a competitive position of timber structures relative to reinforced concrete and steel structures. In this project a new design Section on Lateral Load Resisting Systems was drafted and prepared for future implementation in CSA O86, the Canadian Standard for Engineering Design in Wood. The new Section was prepared based on gathering existing research information on the behaviour of various structural systems used in engineered wood construction around the world as well as developing in-house research information by conducting experimental tests and analytical studies on structural systems subjected to lateral loads. This section for the first time tried to link the system behaviour to that of the connections in the system. Although the developed Section could not have been implemented in CSA O86 in its entirety during the latest code cycle that ended in 2008, the information it contains will form the foundation for future development of technical polls for implementation in the upcoming editions of CSA O86. Some parts of the developed Section were implemented in the 2009 edition of CSA O86 as five separate technical polls. The most important technical poll was the one on Special Seismic Design Considerations for Shearwalls and Diaphragms. This technical poll for the first time in North America includes partial capacity design procedures for wood buildings, and represents a significant step forward towards implementing full capacity-based seismic design procedures for wood structures. Implementation of these design procedures also eliminated most of the confusion and hurdles related to the design of wood-based diaphragms according to 2005 National Building Code of Canada. In other polls, the limit for use of unblocked shearwalls in CSA O86 was raised to 4.8 m, and based on the test results conducted during the project, the NLGA SPS3 fingerjoined studs were allowed to be used as substitutes for regular dimension lumber studs in shearwall applications in engineered buildings in Canada. With the US being the largest export market for the Canadian forest products industry, participation at code development committees in the field of structural and wood engineering in the US is of paramount importance. As a result of extensive activities during this project, for the first time one of the AF&PA Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic includes design values for unblocked shearwalls that were implemented based on FPInnovations’ research results. In addition, the project leader was involved in various aspects related to the NEESWood project in the US, in part of which a full scale six-storey wood-frame building will be tested at the E-Defense shake table in Miki, Japan in July 2009. Apart from being built from lumber and glued-laminated timber provided from Canada, the building will also feature the innovative Midply wood wall system that was also invented in Canada. The tests are expected to provide further technical evidence for increasing the height limits for platform frame construction in North America. Building construction - Design Earthquakes, Effect on building construction Glued joints - Finger Grading - Lumber Wind loads
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Seismic Performance of 6-Storey Wood-Frame Buildings: Final Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2638
Year of Publication
2009
Topic
Seismic
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2009
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Residential
Building Code
Research Status
Complete
Summary
spIn this report, the seismic performance of 6-storey wood frame residential buildings is studied. Two building configurations, a typical wood-frame residential building and a building to be tested under the NEESWood project, were studied. For each building configuration, a four-storey building and a six-storey building were designed to the current (pre-April 6, 2009) 2006 BC Building Code (BCBC) and to the anticipated new requirements in the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (NBCC), resulting in four buildings with different designs. The four-storey building designed to the current 2006 BC Building Code served as the benchmark building representing the performance of current permissible structures with common architectural layouts. In the design of both four-storey and six-storey buildings, it was assumed that the buildings are located in Vancouver on a site with soil class C. Instead of using the code formula, the fundamental natural period of the buildings was determined based on the actual mass and stiffness of wood-based shearwalls. The base shear and inter-storey drift are determined in accordance with Clauses 4.1.8.11.(3)(d)(iii) and 4.1.8.11.(3)(d)(iv) of BCBC, respectively. Computer programs DRAIN 3-D and SAPWood were used to evaluate the seismic performance of the buildings. A series of 20 different earthquake records, 14 of the crustal type and 6 of the subcrustal type, were provided by the Earthquake Engineering Research Facility of the University of British Columbia and used in the evaluation. The records were chosen to fit the 2005 NBCC mean PSA and PSV spectra for the city of Vancouver. For representative buildings designed in accordance with 2006 BCBC, seismic performance with and without gypsum wall board (GWB) is studied. For representative buildings designed in accordance with the 2010 NBCC, the seismic performance with GWB is studied. For the NEESWood building redesigned in accordance with 2010 NBCC, seismic performance without GWB is studied. Ignoring the contribution of GWB would result in a conservative estimate of the seismic performance of the building. In the 2006 BCBC and 2010 NBCC, the inter-storey drift limit is set at 2.5 % of the storey height for the very rare earthquake event (1 in 2475 year return period). Limiting inter-storey drift is a key parameter for meeting the objective of life safety under a seismic event. For 4-storey and 6-storey representative wood-frame buildings where only wood-based shearwalls are considered, results from both DRAIN-3D and SAPWood show that none of the maximum inter-storey drifts at any storey under any individual earthquake exceed the 2.5% inter-storey drift limit given in the building code. With DRAIN-3D, the average maximum inter-storey drifts are approximately 1.2% and 1.5% for 4-storey and 6-storey buildings designed with 2006 BCBC, respectively. For the NEESWood wood-frame building, none of the maximum inter-storey drifts at any storey under any individual earthquake exceed the 2.5% inter-storey drift limit for 4-storey building obtained from SAPWood and 6-storey building obtained from DRAIN-3D and SAPWood. For any 4-storey building analysed with DRAIN-3D, approximately half of the earthquakes resulted in the maximum inter-storey drifts greater than 2.5% inter-storey limit. This is partly due to the assumptions used in Drain-3D model in which the lumped mass at each storey is equally distributed to all the nodes of the floor. As a result, the total weight to counteract the uplift force at the ends of a wall would be much smaller than that anticipated in the design, thus causing hold-downs to yield and large uplift deformations to occur. Based on the analyses of a representative building and a redesigned NEESWood building situated in the city of Vancouver that subjected the structures to 20 earthquake records, 6-storey wood-frame building is expected to show similar or smaller inter-storey drift than a 4-storey wood-frame building, which is currently deemed acceptable under the current building code. Building construction - Design Building construction - Specfications Earthquakes, Effect on building construction
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Prediction of Dynamic Response of a 7-Storey Massive XLam Wooden Building Tested on a Shaking Table

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1885
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Dujic, Bruno
Žarnic, Roko
Pirmanšek, Klara
Ceccotti, Ario
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Full Scale Test
Blind Prediction
Static Analyses
Stiffness
Load Bearing
Mechanical Connectors
Dynamic Analysis
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 20-24, 2010, Riva del Garda, Italy
Summary
In October 2007 a series of seismic tests were carried out on a 7-storey building made of cross laminated (XLam) wooden panels in natural scale on a shaking table E-Defence in Japan within the SOFIE project. The paper presents calculation procedure, prediction of dynamic behaviour of the tested structure excited by the earthquake record "Kobe JMA 1995" and comparison between predicted, that means calculated and measured response. Due to blind prediction approach some construction details were not known before dynamic time history response calculation. Therefore some assumptions, engineering judgment and rough static analyses were needed to define all construction parts which were in modelling approach assumed as important and could have had influence on dynamic response of the analyzed structure. The most important assumptions related to the definition of the stiffness and load bearing capacity of mechanical connections, types of anchors and their positions in each floor level, were determined on the basis of static analysis where the structure was loaded with equivalent horizontal seismic forces and then were used in dynamic analysis. A mathematical model was developed in program SAP2000 where modal and time history analyses were carried out. Comparison of calculated and measured results is described and evaluated on the basis of the model assumptions and its simplification.
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Lateral Load Resistance of Cross-Laminated Wood Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2150
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Schneider, Johannes
Schweinsteiger, Matthias
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Quasi-Static Tests
Seismic Performance
Screws
Nails
Steel Brackets
Timber Rivets
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this paper, some of the results are presented from a series of quasi-static tests on CLT wall panels conducted at FPInnovation-Forintek in Vancouver, BC. CLT wall panels with various configurations and connection details were tested. Wall configurations included single panel walls with three different aspect ratios, multi-panel walls with step joints and different types of screws to connect them, as well as two-storey wall assemblies. Connections for securing the walls to the foundation included: off-the-shelf steel brackets with annular ring nails, spiral nails, and screws; combination of steel brackets and hold-downs; diagonally placed long screws; and custom made brackets with timber rivets. Results showed that CLT walls can have adequate seismic performance when nails or screws are used with the steel brackets. Use of hold-downs with nails on each end of the wall improves its seismic performance. Use of diagonally placed long screws to connect the CLT walls to the floor below is not recommended in high seismic zones due to less ductile wall behaviour. Use of step joints in longer walls can be an effective solution not only to reduce the wall stiffness and thus reduce the seismic input load, but also to improve the wall deformation capabilities. Timber rivets in smaller groups with custom made brackets were found to be effective connectors for CLT wall panels. Further research in this field is needed to further clarify the use of timber rivets in CLT.
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Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1891
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Publisher
University of Trento
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Direct Displacement-Based Design
Direct-DBD
Full-Scale
Single Family Houses
Multi-Storey
Connections
Research Status
Complete
Notes
Doctoral Thesis (PhD)
Summary
The research is aimed at developing seismic methods for the design and evaluation of the seismic vulnerability of wooden structures, using a displacement-based approach. After a brief introduction on the seismic behaviour of timber structures, the general Direct Displacement-Based Design (Direct-DBD) procedure and the state-of-the-art are presented, with clear reference to the application of the Direct-DBD method to wooden buildings. The strength of the Direct-DBD method is its ability to design structures in a manner consistent with the level of damage expected, by directly relating the response and the expected performance of the structure. The research begins with a description of the procedural aspects of the Direct-DBD method and the parameters required for its application. The research presented focuses on the formulation of a displacement-based seismic design procedure, applicable to one-storey wooden structures made with a portal system. This typology is very common in Europe and particularly in Italy. A series of analytical expressions have been developed to calculate design parameters. The required analytical Direct-DBD parameters are implemented based on the mechanical behaviour of the connections, made with metal dowel-type fasteners. The calibration and subsequent validation of design parameters use a Monte Carlo numerical simulation and outcomes obtained by tests in full-scale. After the description of the Displacement-Based method for one-storey wooden structures, a series of guidelines to extend the Direct-DBD methodology to other types and categories of timber systems are proposed. The thesis presents the case of a multi-storey wood frame construction, which is a simple extension of the glulam portal frame system. Part of this work has been done within the RELUIS Project, (REte dei Laboratori Universitari di Ingegneria Sismica), Research Line IV, which in the years between 2005 and 2008 involved several Italian universities and Italian institutes of research in the development of new seismic design methods. The Project produced the first draft of model code for the seismic design of structures based on displacement (Direct-DBD). This thesis is the background to the section of the model code developed for timber structures.
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Direct Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures with Dowel-Type Fastener Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1899
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Piazza, Maurizio
Zonta, Daniele
Publisher
Sociedade Portuguesa de Engenharia Sismica (SPES)
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Direct Displacement-Based Design
Equivalent Viscous Damping
Dowel Type Fastener
Conference
15WCEE
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 24-28, 2012, Lisbon, Portugal
Summary
The applicability of the Direct Displacement-Based Design (DBD) procedure is strictly related to a priori evaluation of the design displacement and the matching Equivalent Viscous Damping (EVD) of the structure. In this paper we propose analytical models of these design parameters, at the ultimate limit state, for wooden structures built with engineered joints. Experimental results show that the plastic resources and dissipative capabilities of timber structures under earthquake conditions are ensured by the connections between the members. Therefore, the formulation of the design DBD parameters is based on the mechanical model of the single connector and assumes the inelastic deformation of the structure to be concentrated at the joints. The expected non-linear response of the connections can be either ductile or brittle. However, through an appropriate choice of the geometry and strength characteristics of the materials, in the design process we can control the expected ductile behavior of joints.
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Free
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Seismic Behaviour of Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2151
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Popovski, Marjan
Karacabeyli, Erol
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Seismic Resistance
Force Modification Factors
Quasi-Static Tests
National Building Code of Canada
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
European experience shows that besides single family housing, Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be competitive in mid-rise and high-rise buildings. Although this system has not been used to the same extent so far in North America, it can be viable wood structural solution for the shift towards sustainable densification of urban and suburban centres. FPInnovations has undertaken a multidisciplinary project on determining the structural properties of a typical CLT construction, including quantifying the seismic resistance and force modification factors of CLT buildings. In this paper, some of the results from a series of quasi-static tests on CLT wall panels are presented as well as preliminary estimates for the force modification factors (R-factors) for seismic design of CLT structures. CLT wall panels with various configurations and connection details were tested. Wall configurations included single panels without openings with three different aspect ratios, panels with openings, as well as multi-panel walls with step joints and fasteners between them. Connections for securing the walls to the foundation included off-the-shelf steel brackets with annular ring nails, spiral nails, and screws; a combination of steel brackets and hold-downs; and custom made brackets with timber rivets. Results from two storey configurations that include two walls and a CLT slab in between are presented and discussed. Finally preliminary estimates and recommendations for the force modification factors (R-factors) for seismic design of CLT structures according to National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) are also made.
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Free
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Carterton Events Centre Auditorium Pres-Lam Wall Design and Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue38
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Dekker, Dave
Chung, Stanley
Palermo, Alessandro
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Post-Tensioned
Pres-Lam
Sustainability
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
Driven by sustainability, locally available resources and expertise, and economy, the design of the Carterton Events Centre focused on timber for the majority of the main structural and non-structural components. Combined with a client desire for minimization of earthquake damage, dissipative post-tensioned rocking Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) shear walls (Pres-Lam) were considered for the lateral load resisting system. During design development various structural forms were explored and tested through costing to determine an economic design solution meeting the project drivers. Advanced numerical analyses carried out by the University of Canterbury validated the design process assuring confidence with the design of the technology.
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Free
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Experimental-Numerical Analyses of the Seismic Behaviour of Cross-Laminated Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue56
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Gavric, Igor
Rinaldin, Giovanni
Amadio, Claudio
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Ceccotti, Ario
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Abaqus
Experimental
Numerical
Full Scale
Cyclic Testing
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 24-28, 2012, Lisbon, Portugal
Summary
The paper discusses experimental and numerical seismic analyses of typical connections and wall systems used in cross-laminated (X-Lam) timber buildings. An extended experimental programme on typical X-Lam connections was performed at IVALSA Trees and Timber Institute. In addition, cyclic tests were also carried out on full-scale single and coupled X-Lam wall panels with different configurations and mechanical connectors subjected to lateral force. An advanced non-linear hysteretic spring to describe accurately the cyclic behaviour of connections was implemented in ABAQUS finite element software package as an external subroutine. The FE model with the springs calibrated on single connection tests was then used to reproduce numerically the behaviour of X-Lam wall panels, and the results were compared with the outcomes of experimental full-scale tests carried out at IVALSA. The developed model is suitable for evaluating dissipated energy and seismic vulnerability of X-Lam structures.
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Damage Assessment of Cross Laminated Timber Connections Subjected to Simulated Earthquake Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue70
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Schneider, Johannes
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Karacabeyli, Erol
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Damage
Panels
North American Market
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 15-19, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
Wood-frame is the most common construction type for residential buildings in North America. However, there is a limit to the height of the building using a traditional wood-frame structure. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) provides possible solutions to mid-rise and high-rise wood buildings. CLT offers many advantages such as improved dimensional stability, a quicker erection time and good performance in case of fire. In order to introduce the cross-laminated timber products to the North American market, it is important to gain a comprehensive understanding of its structural properties. This paper focuses on the seismic performance of CLT connections. Over the last few years FPInnovations of Canada has conducted a test program to determine the structural properties of CLT panels and its application in shear walls. The test program comprised of more than 100 connection tests which followed the loading procedures of CUREE and ISO test protocols as specified in ASTM Standards ASTM E 2126-09 (2009). These tests were performed parallel and perpendicular to the grain of the outer layer, respectively. The impact of different connections on the seismic performance of CLT walls was investigated in a second phase on full size shearwall. CLT panels are relatively stiff and thus energy dissipation must be accomplished through the ductile behaviour of connections between different shear wall elements and the connections to the story below. A literature review on previous research work related to damage prediction and assessment for wood frame structures was performed. Different approaches for damage indices were compared and discussed. This paper describes how the energy-based cumulative damage assessment model was calibrated to the CLT connection and shear wall test data in order to investigate the damage under monotonic and cyclic loading. Comparison of different wall setup provided a deeper insight into the damage estimation of CLT shear walls and determination of the key parameters in the damage formulation. This represents a first published attempt to apply the damage indices to estimate the seismic behaviour of CLT shear walls.
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317 records – page 1 of 32.