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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Assessing the Market Opportunity for Treated Glued Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2635
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Fell, David
Toosi, B.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Poles
Sound Abatement Barriers
Market Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study market opportunities for treated glue-laminated (glulam) products were investigated in the industrial wood sector. The main benefits of treated glulam are through-product treatment and the ability to manufacture treated products in shapes and sizes that do not fit into common treating chambers. These attributes provide for very durable and large glulam structures that are appropriate for outdoor use. For these reasons bridges, power poles, and sound abatement barriers were investigated. These are markets where wood has lost market share to or is being challenged by concrete and steel substitutes. The vehicular bridge market was once heavy to the use of wood. Today wood accounts for only 7% of the number bridges in the US and less than 0.9% of the actual surface area of bridges in place. In interviewing municipalities in Canada it is clear that wood is not the preferred material with many wood bridges being replaced by concrete. Further, none of the municipalities contacted were planning wood bridges. However, wood bridges are still being installed. In the US 0.9% of the bridges installed by area in 2007 were wood. This is good news as wood is holding its market share. Steering clear of high volume or large bridges, local bridges are well suited for wood as they are plentiful, small in scale, and many are in disrepair. If 20% of local bridges were built with wood in Canada this would have equalled approximately $51 million in wood bridge construction in 2007. Municipalities are much more open to the use of wood for pedestrian bridges and overpasses. Their quick construction and aesthetics are positive attributes in this application. One municipality contacted is planning multiple wood pedestrian bridges in the next five years. However, for the purpose of this market review there is little published information on pedestrian bridges. Noise abatement barriers are a good high-volume technical fit for treated glulam. Increases in traffic and current road infrastructure improvements will lead to more demand for sound abatement in the future. This market is dominated by concrete, but at a very high price. If treated glulam can give adequate durability and sound performance properties it would be approximately 20% cheaper than concrete. The market for sound barriers in Canada could utilize up to 10 mmbf of wood per year to construct 80 km of barrier. This product can also be marketed as a high-performance acoustic fence for residential markets. Treated glulam was also considered for utility poles. It is transmission grade poles where glulam would best fit the market as the demand is for longer poles which are more difficult to get in solid wood. This type of pole is where wood is currently being displaced by tubular steel. If glulam poles were used in 25% of the replacement transmission poles per year this could equal 8 mmbf. Light poles or standards are another market to consider. While this is a relatively low volume market glulam light standards are a premium product in European markets.
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Construction bois de plus de 8 m de hauteur – Retours d’expériences

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2389
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Agence Qualité Construction
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
France
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Le développement de la construction bois, en particulier de moyenne et grande hauteur, est un enjeu clef de la transition environnementale du domaine de la construction. Il doit se faire de façon la plus qualitative possible. Des opérations de construction bois de moyenne et grande hauteur sont déjà menées par des acteurs précurseurs et doivent être envisagées comme des piliers pour préfigurer les développements à venir. Le Rapport REX sur les constructions bois de plus de 8 m de hauteur permet de capitaliser et de valoriser leurs retours d’expériences afin de sensibiliser et de guider l’ensemble des acteurs de la filière aux enjeux de la construction bois. Cette montée en compétences par le partage des points de vigilance et des bonnes pratiques est le gage d’un développement à la hauteur des objectifs de qualité, de performance et de confort visés.
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Free
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Enabling Prefabricated Timber Building Systems in Commercial Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1927
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bylund, David
Organization
Centre for Sustainable Architecture in Wood
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Prefabrication
Commercial
NCC
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-1-925213-58-4
Summary
This project identifies drivers for, and barriers to, the increased use of prefabricated timber building (PTB) systems in Class 2 to 9 commercial buildings, such as apartments, hotels, office buildings and schools. PTB systems in Australia are in a formative stage and yet to achieve broad acceptance in the marketplace as a conventional method of building. Opportunities for PTB systems can use timber’s well-established benefits such as high strength-to-weight ratio; design and construction flexibility; general environmental credentials including carbon sequestration; and prefabrication’s suitability for use on brown-field, restricted access and difficult sites and developments. In addition legislative constraints have now been largely removed (e.g. through changes to the 2016 National Construction Code). An increase in large scale mid-rise prefabricated buildings, and with the increasing nationalisation and internationalisation of the top tier building companies, suggests market acceptance will grow as PTB buildings are seen as ‘normal’.
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Fire Safety and Tall Timber Buildings—What’s Next?

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1253
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Barber, David
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Fire Safety
Exposed Load Bearing Timber
Concealed Connections
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2017
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 6–8, 2017, Denver, Colorado
Summary
Model building codes in the United States limit timber construction to six stories, due to concerns over fire safety and structural performance. With new timber technologies, tall timber buildings are now being planned for construction. The process for building approval for a building constructed above the code height limits with a timber load-bearing structure...
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Glued Laminated Timber in Brazil: Past - Present and Future

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1789
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Calil Neto, Carlito
Fujii, Rogerio
Takata, Alexander
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Brazil
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 6081-6088
Summary
Almost half of Brazil's area is forest. Technologically manipulated and protected from natural disasters caused by fire, insects and diseases, forests will last forever. As older trees are removed, they are replaced by new trees to replenish the wood supply for future generations. The regeneration cycle, or support field, can easily overcome the...
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Free
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Hem-Fir Mass Timber Research Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2531
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Ference & Company
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mass Timber
Research
Regulatory Factors
Technical Factors
Market Factors
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of the study is to evaluate and summarize any technical or other impediments to using hem-fir in mass timber products. The different mass timber products included in the study are cross-laminated timber (CLT), glue-laminated timber (glulam), dowel-laminated timber (DLT) and nail-laminated timber (NLT).
Online Access
Free
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Mass Timber Building Science Primer

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2797
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Fire
Acoustics and Vibration
General Information
Connections
Market and Adoption
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kesik, Ted
Martin, Rosemary
Organization
Mass Timber Institute
RDH Building Science
Publisher
Mass Timber Institute
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Fire
Acoustics and Vibration
General Information
Connections
Market and Adoption
Serviceability
Keywords
Mass Timber
Building Science
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The development of this primer commenced shortly after the 2018 launch of the Mass Timber Institute (MTI) centered at the University of Toronto. Funding for this publication was generously provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Although numerous jurisdictions have established design guides for tall mass timber buildings, architects and engineers often do not have access to the specialized building science knowledge required to deliver well performing mass timber buildings. MTI worked collaboratively with industry, design professionals, academia, researchers and code experts to develop the scope and content of this mass timber building science primer. Although provincially funded, the broader Canadian context underlying this publication was viewed as the most appropriate means of advancing Ontario’s nascent mass timber building industry. This publication also extends beyond Canada and is based on universally applicable principles of building science and how these principles may be used anywhere in all aspects of mass timber building technology. Specifically, these guidelines were developed to guide stakeholders in selecting and implementing appropriate building science practices and protocols to ensure the acceptable life cycle performance of mass timber buildings. It is essential that each representative stakeholder, developer/owner, architect/engineer, supplier, constructor, wood erector, building official, insurer, and facility manager, understand these principles and how to apply them during the design, procurement, construction and in-service phases before embarking on a mass timber building project. When mass timber building technology has enjoyed the same degree of penetration as steel and concrete, this primer will be long outdated and its constituent concepts will have been baked into the training and education of design professionals and all those who fabricate, construct, maintain and manage mass timber buildings. One of the most important reasons this publication was developed was to identify gaps in building science knowledge related to mass timber buildings and hopefully to address these gaps with appropriate research, development and demonstration programs. The mass timber building industry in Canada is still a collection of seedlings that continue to grow and as such they deserve the stewardship of the best available building science knowledge to sustain them until such time as they become a forest that can fend for itself.
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Free
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Measuring-Up In Timber: A Critical Perspective on Mid- and High-Rise Timber Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue607
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Fleming, Patrick
Smith, Simon
Ramage, Michael
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Europe
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
arq: Architectural Research Quarterly
Online Access
Free
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Risk Analysis and Alternative Solution for Three- and Four-Storey Schools of Mass Timber and/or Wood-Frame Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2374
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
GHL Consultants Ltd.
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Fire
Keywords
Building Code
Education
School Buildings
Multi-Storey
Fire Test
Fire Safety
Technical Risk
Process Risk
Mass Timber
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report explores the building code related considerations of wood construction for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. Though wood construction offers a viable structural material option for these buildings, the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) currently limits schools comprised of wood construction to a maximum of two storeys. Three- and four-storey schools and larger floor areas in wood construction require an Alternative Solution. The report identifies key fire safety features offered by combustible construction materials including tested and currently widely available engineered mass timber products, such as glued-laminated timber and cross-laminated timber. A risk analysis identifies the risk areas defined by the objectives of the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) and evaluates the level of performance of the Building Code solutions for assembly occupancies vis-à-vis the level of performance offered by the proposed schools up to four storeys in building height. As land values continue to rise, particularly in higher-density urban environments, schools with smaller footprints will become increasingly more necessary to satisfy enrollment demands. There are currently a number of planned new school projects throughout British Columbia that anticipate requiring either three-or four-storey buildings, and it is forecasted that the demand for school buildings of this size will continue to rise. This report is closely related to the study Design Options for Three-and Four-Storey Wood School Buildings in British Columbia, which illustrates the range of possible timber construction approaches for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height.
Online Access
Free
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Solid Timber Construction: Process, Practice, Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue974
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Market and Adoption
Cost
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

12 records – page 1 of 2.