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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Assessing the Market Opportunity for Treated Glued Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2635
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Fell, David
Toosi, B.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Poles
Sound Abatement Barriers
Market Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study market opportunities for treated glue-laminated (glulam) products were investigated in the industrial wood sector. The main benefits of treated glulam are through-product treatment and the ability to manufacture treated products in shapes and sizes that do not fit into common treating chambers. These attributes provide for very durable and large glulam structures that are appropriate for outdoor use. For these reasons bridges, power poles, and sound abatement barriers were investigated. These are markets where wood has lost market share to or is being challenged by concrete and steel substitutes. The vehicular bridge market was once heavy to the use of wood. Today wood accounts for only 7% of the number bridges in the US and less than 0.9% of the actual surface area of bridges in place. In interviewing municipalities in Canada it is clear that wood is not the preferred material with many wood bridges being replaced by concrete. Further, none of the municipalities contacted were planning wood bridges. However, wood bridges are still being installed. In the US 0.9% of the bridges installed by area in 2007 were wood. This is good news as wood is holding its market share. Steering clear of high volume or large bridges, local bridges are well suited for wood as they are plentiful, small in scale, and many are in disrepair. If 20% of local bridges were built with wood in Canada this would have equalled approximately $51 million in wood bridge construction in 2007. Municipalities are much more open to the use of wood for pedestrian bridges and overpasses. Their quick construction and aesthetics are positive attributes in this application. One municipality contacted is planning multiple wood pedestrian bridges in the next five years. However, for the purpose of this market review there is little published information on pedestrian bridges. Noise abatement barriers are a good high-volume technical fit for treated glulam. Increases in traffic and current road infrastructure improvements will lead to more demand for sound abatement in the future. This market is dominated by concrete, but at a very high price. If treated glulam can give adequate durability and sound performance properties it would be approximately 20% cheaper than concrete. The market for sound barriers in Canada could utilize up to 10 mmbf of wood per year to construct 80 km of barrier. This product can also be marketed as a high-performance acoustic fence for residential markets. Treated glulam was also considered for utility poles. It is transmission grade poles where glulam would best fit the market as the demand is for longer poles which are more difficult to get in solid wood. This type of pole is where wood is currently being displaced by tubular steel. If glulam poles were used in 25% of the replacement transmission poles per year this could equal 8 mmbf. Light poles or standards are another market to consider. While this is a relatively low volume market glulam light standards are a premium product in European markets.
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Fire Code Development - A Literature Review of North American and Chinese Fire Regulations Related to Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue358
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Fire
Market and Adoption
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Peng, Lei
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Multi-Storey
North America
China
Fire Safety
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wood frame construction in China is currently limited to 3-storey buildings, mainly due to fire risk perceptions. However, multi-storey (more than 3 storeys) wood frame buildings are gaining popularity around the globe, while providing an acceptable level of performance in...
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Free
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Force Modification Factors for Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue363
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Popovski, Marjan
van de Lindt, John
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Performance-Based Seismic Design
Canada
US
Force Modification Factors
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
European experience shows that Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) can be competitive in mid-rise and high-rise buildings. Although this system has not been used to the same extent so far in North America, it can be viable wood structural solution for the shift towards sustainable densification of urban and suburban centers. For these reasons FPInnovations has undertaken a multi-disciplinary project on determining the performance of a typical CLT construction, including quantifying the seismic resistance and force modification factors for CLT buildings in Canada and the US. In this report, a performance-based seismic design (PBSD) of a CLT building was conducted and the seismic response of the CLT building was compared to that of a wood-frame structure tested during the NEESWood project. A suitable force modification factors (R-factors) for CLT mid-rise buildings with different fasteners were recommended for seismic design in Canada and the US. The six-storey NEESWood Capstone building was redesigned as a CLT building using the PBSD procedure developed during the NEESWood project. The results from the quasi-static tests on CLT walls performed at FPInnovations were used as input information for modeling of the main load resisting elements of the structure, the CLT walls. Once the satisfactory design of the CLT mid-rise structure was established through PBSD, a force-based design was developed with varying R-factors and that design was compared to the PBSD result. In this way, suitable R-factors were calibrated so that they can yield equivalent seismic performance of the CLT building when designed using the traditional force-based design methods. Based on the results of this study it is recommended that a value of Rd=2.5 and Ro=1.5 can be assigned for structures with symmetrical floor plans according to NBCC. In the US an R=4.5 can be used for symmetrical CLT structures designed according to ASCE7. These values can be assigned provided that the design values for CLT walls considered (and implemented in the material design standards) are similar to the values determined in this study using the kinematics model developed that includes the influence of the hold-downs in the CLT wall resistance. Design of the CLT building with those R-factors using the equivalent static procedures in the US and Canada will result in the CLT building having similar seismic performance to that of the tested wood-frame NEESWood building, which had only minor non-structural damage during a rare earthquake event.
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Literature Review: Fire Stop Requirements as Related to Massive Wood Wall and Floor Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue405
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Fire
Keywords
Fire Stop
Canada
National Building Code of Canada
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In an attempt to prevent the spread of fire and smoke beyond the compartment in which the fire starts, regulations often require building construction such as walls and floors to exhibit varying degrees of fire resistance. Since penetrations for building service equipment and systems in wall and floor assemblies acting as fire separations are unavoidable...
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Free
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Literature Survey on Nail-Laminated Timber and Box Beam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1210
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Ni, Chun
Karacabeyli, Erol
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Box Beams
Mechanical Joints
CSA 086
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Nail-Laminated Timber (NLT) and box beam are efficient and economical engineered wood products. Although NLT has been used in North America for more than a century, only in recent years it has gained renewed interests as they have been seen as the most economical panel products used in mass timber buildings. Box beams, on the other hand, are lightweight and generally possess higher strength and stiffness than comparable-sized solid timber and are more efficient than solid timber large spans and loads. In this report, existing design provisions and their limitations for the design and construction of NLT in box beam in Canadian standards are reviewed. For NLT, there is a general lack of information related to manufacturing, design and construction to ensure consistent manufacturing and installation practices. Therefore, it is difficult to research and document with confidence the full range of performance that can be achieved with NLT. It is therefore recommended that a North American product standard and design information on structural performance, floor vibration, fire resistance, acoustic performance, and construction risk mitigation measures (e.g. moisture and fire) be developed. In CSA 086, design methods are limited to box beams with flanges and webs bonded with glue. As the flanges and webs of a box beam can be assembled by either glue or mechanical fasteners, it is recommended that design provisions for box beam with mechanical joints be also developed. With the information in Eurocode 5 and relevant supporting research papers, it is ready to be implemented.
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Free
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What is Holding Back the Expanded Use of Prefabricated Wood Building Systems?

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2608
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kuan, S.
Kaustinen, Mark
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mass Timber
Barriers to Adoption
Recommendations
Prefabrication
Performance
Markets
Design
Building Construction
Sustainable Construction
Wood Products
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Abstract Across B.C. and Canada, communities are under pressure to create better-performing buildings that meet stringent code requirements while reducing construction waste. Meanwhile, consumers are demanding high-quality structures that are delivered quickly and at a reasonable price. Modern methods of construction that include prefabrication can help construction professionals create buildings that meet all these criteria. Furthermore, prefabrication provides steady employment and is good for the economy. The market opportunities are present across Canada and in the U.S., but prefabrication is not being used to its potential due to several barriers: Negative perception of quality Fear of innovation Lack of information and understanding Unclear economic benefits Limited industry capacity Planning and regulatory complications Recommendations A concerted effort to address these barriers includes: Improving products through research and development Researching, documenting, and promoting best practices Developing guidance documents so prefabrication is easier to incorporate Providing national-level leadership and resources to promote innovation Successfully implementing these recommendations will require a broad and deep national perspective, an understanding of all stages and aspects of wood construction, and the vision and skills to bring together diverse experts and stakeholders. WhitePaper Innovation Series
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Free
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6 records – page 1 of 1.