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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Analytical Models for Balloon-Type CLT Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1877
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Shear
Mass Timber
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Lack of research and design information for the seismic performance of balloon-type CLT shear walls prevents CLT from being used as an acceptable solution to resist seismic loads in balloon-type mass-timber buildings. To quantify the performance of balloon-type CLT structures subjected to lateral loads and create the research background for future code implementation of balloon-type CLT systems in CSA O86 and NBCC, FPInnovations initiated a project to determine the behaviour of balloon-type CLT construction. A series of tests on balloon-type CLT walls and connections used in these walls were conducted. Analytical models were developed based on engineering principles and basic mechanics to predict the deflection and resistance of the balloon-type CLT shear walls. This report covers the work related to development of the analytical models and the tests on balloon-type CLT walls that the models were verified against.
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Structural Performance of Post-Tensioned CLT Shear Walls with Energy Dissipators

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1472
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Symons, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Compression Tests
Compression Strength
Energy Dissipation
Post-Tensioned
Pres-Lam
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The latest developments in seismic design philosophy have been geared towards developing of so called "resilient" or "low damage" innovative structural systems that can reduce damage to the structure while offering the same or higher levels of safety to occupants. One such innovative structural system is the Pres-Lam system that is a wood-hybrid system that utilizes post-tensioned (PT) mass timber components in both rigid-frame and wall-based buildings along with various types of energy disspators. To help implement the Pres-Lam system in Canada and the US, information about the system performance made with North American engineered wood products is needed. That information can later be used to develop design guidelines for the designers for wider acceptance of the system by the design community.Several components influence the performance of the Pres-Lam systems: the load-deformation properties of the engineered wood products under compression, load-deformation and energy dissipation properties of the dissipators used, placement of the dissipators in the system, and the level of post-tensioning force. The influence of all these components on the performance of Pres-Lam wall systems under gravity and lateral loads was investigated in this research project. The research project consisted of two main parts: material tests and system tests.
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Advancing Knowledge of Mid-ply Shear Walls: Mid-Ply Shear Wall Fire Resistance Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2808
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Dagenais, Christian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Shear Walls
Fire Resistance Rating
Mid-Rise
Midply Wall
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research is to address a knowledge gap related to fire performance of midply shear walls. Testing has already been done to establish the structural performance of these assemblies. To ensure their safe implementation and their broad acceptance, this project will establish fire resistance ratings for midply shear walls. Fire tests will provide information for the development of design considerations for midply shear walls and confirm that they can achieve at least 1-hour fire-resistance ratings that are required for use in mid-rise buildings. This research will support greater adoption of mid-rise residential and non-residential wood-frame construction and improve competition with similar buildings of noncombustible construction. This work will also support the development of the APA system report for midply walls, which will be a design guideline for using midply walls in North America.
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Advancing Tall Mass Timber Buildings through Seismic Resilience Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2584
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Cores
Organization
University of Nevada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Cores
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Rocking Walls
Shake Table Test
Mass Timber
Non-structural Components and Systems
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Keri Ryan at University of Nevada, Reno (United States)
Summary
A landmark shake table test of a 10-story mass timber building will be conducted in late 2020. The test program, funded by other sources, will help accelerate the adoption of economically competitive tall timber buildings by validating the seismic performance of a resilient cross-laminated timber (CLT) rocking wall system. In this project, we leverage and extend the test program by including critical nonstructural components and systems (NCS). Including NCSs, which are most vulnerable to rocking induced deformations of the CLT core, allows investigation of the ramification of this emerging structural type on building resiliency. Quantifying interactions amongst vertically and horizontally spanning NCSs during earthquake shaking will allow designers to develop rational design strategies for future installation of such systems. The expected research outcomes are to expand knowledge of rocking wall system interactions with various NCS, identify NCS vulnerabilities in tall timber buildings, and develop solutions to address these vulnerabilities. Moreover, this effort will greatly increase visibility of the test program. The results of this research will be widely disseminated to timber design and NCS communities through conference presentations, online webinars, and distribution to publicly accessible research repositories. 
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Air-Borne Sound Transmission through Triple-Leaf Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2235
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Eslami, Armin
Organization
Carleton University
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Airborne Sound
Model
Sound Transmission
Sound Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Midply™ triple-leaf shear resistive wall is designed by FPInnovations and UBC to be employed in mid-rise wood building. Compared to double-leaf structures, this wall has a weaker low-frequency sound insulation due to the additional resonance created by the middle-leaf. The original contribution of this thesis is developing a method to predict the air-borne sound transmission through triple-leaf walls, which can incorporate perforated plates. The model is based on a modified Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) that accounts for the losses at the perimeter of the finite cavity. The air-borne sound transmission tests performed on simplified small-scale structures showed that the modified TMM model has acceptable predictions in most frequencies, although Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was superior for high-frequency predictions. The research suggests that the sound insulation in triple-leaf structures could be improved through careful perforation of the middle-leaf, which is suggested for future work.
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Ambient and Forced Vibration Testing and Finite Element Model Updating of a Full-Scale Posttensioned Laminated Veneer Lumber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1103
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Worth, Margaret
Omenzetter, Piotr
Morris, Hugh
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Full Scale
In Situ
Finite Element Model
Dynamic Performance
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
The Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts and Media building was completed in 2011 and consists of three seismically separate complexes. This research focussed on the Arts building as it showcases the use of coupled post-tensioned timber shear walls. These are part of the innovative Expan system. Full-scale, in-situ dynamic testing of the novel building was combined with finite element modelling and updating to obtain an understanding of the structural dynamic performance within the linear range. Ambient testing was performed at three stages during construction and was combined with forced vibration testing for the final stage. This forms part of a larger instrumentation program developed to investigate the wind and seismic response and long term deformations of the building. A finite element model of the building was formulated and updated using experimental modal characteristics. It was shown that the addition of non-structural elements, such as cladding and the staircase, increased the natural frequency of the first mode and the second mode by 19% and 24%, respectively. The addition of the concrete floor topping as a structural diaphragm significantly increased the natural frequency of the first mode but not the second mode, with an increase of 123% and 18%, respectively. The elastic damping of the NMIT building at low-level vibrations was identified as being between 1.6% and 2.4%.
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Ambient Vibration Tests of a Cross-Laminated Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue313
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Harris, Richard
Chang, Wen-Shao
Bregulla, Julie
Bawcombe, Jonathan
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Damping
Dynamic Movement
In Situ
Multi-Storey
Stiffness
Modal Properties
Ambient Vibration Method
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Construction Materials
Summary
Cross-laminated timber has, in the last 6 years, been used for the first time to form shear walls and cores in multi-storey buildings of seven storeys or more. Such buildings can have low mass in comparison to conventional structural forms. This low mass means that, as cross-laminated timber is used for taller buildings still, their dynamic movement under wind load is likely to be a key design parameter. An understanding of dynamic lateral stiffness and damping, which has so far been insufficiently researched, will be vital to the effective design for wind-induced vibration. In this study, an ambient vibration method is used to identify the dynamic properties of a seven-storey cross-laminated timber building in situ. The random decrement method is used, along with the Ibrahim time domain method, to extract the modal properties of the structure from the acceleration measured under ambient conditions. The results show that this output-only modal analysis method can be used to extract modal information from such a building, and that information is compared with a simple structural model. Measurements on two occasions during construction show the effect of non-structural elements on the modal properties of the structure.
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Analysis and enhancement of the new Eurocode 5 formulations for the lateral elastic deformation of LTF and CLT walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3311
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Aloisio, Angelo
Boggian, Francesco
Sævareid, Håkon Østraat
Bjørkedal, Johan
Tomasi, Roberto
Organization
Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Università degli Studi di Trento
Università degli Studi dell’Aquila
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Light Timber Frames
Lateral Deformation
Shear Walls
Eurocode 5
Finite Element Modelling
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structures
Summary
This paper analyses the analytical formulations for the lateral elastic deformation of Light Timber Framed (LTF) and Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) shear walls according to the new Eurocode 5 (EC5) proposal. Finite Element (FE) models and the Standard predictions are compared by emphasizing the role of each deformation contribution. A total of 1830 comparisons between analytical and numerical estimations are carried out by exploiting the Application Programming Interface of SAP2000 to modify the FE model parameters automatically. The parametric analyses proved that the numerical and analytical predictions are pretty consistent. Furthermore, in both LTF and CLT shear walls, the estimates for in-plane shear and rigid body sliding are in excellent agreement. Conversely, the analytical formulas for kinematic rocking are generally conservative for LTF and monolithic CLT shear walls, with an approximate 18%–19% discrepancy. The analytical expressions of the upcoming EC5 perfectly match the numerical model for segmented CLT shear walls under lateral forces and no vertical load. However, the presence of the vertical load determines a significant bias. Additionally, the predictions for bending deformations are not in good agreement. Therefore, the paper discusses possible enhancements for the equations proposed in the next generation of Eurocodes for the rocking deformation of segmented CLT walls to better conform with FE predictions.
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Analysis Behavior of Openings on Full-Size Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Frame Shear Walls Tested Monotonically

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3335
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Dungani, Rudi
Sulistyono
Karliati, Tati
Suhaya, Yoyo
Malik, Jamaludin
Alpian
Supriyati, Wahyu
Organization
Institut Teknologi Bandung
Kuningan University
Palangka Raya University
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Monotonic Test
Seismic Resistance
Wood-Frame
Opening
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forests
Summary
Walls, as components of the lateral-force-resisting system of a building, are defined as shear walls. This study aims to determine the behavior of shear wall panel cross-laminated-timber-based mangium wood (Acacia mangium Willd) (CLT-mangium) in earthquake-resistant prefabricated houses. The earthquake performance of CLT mangium frame shear walls panels has been studied using monotonic tests. The shear walls were constructed using CLT-mangium measuring 2400 mm × 1200 mm × 68 mm with various design patterns (straight sheathing, diagonal sheathing/45°, windowed shear wall with diagonal pattern and a door shear wall with a diagonal pattern). Shear wall testing was carried out using a racking test, and seismic force calculations were obtained using static equivalent earthquake analysis. CLT-mangium sheathing installed horizontally (straight sheathing) is relatively weak compared to the diagonal sheathing, but it is easier and more flexible to manufacture. The diagonal sheathing type is stronger and stiffer because it has triangulation properties, such as truss properties, but is more complicated to manufacture (less flexible). The type A design is suitable for low-intensity zones (2), and types B, D, E1 and E2 are suitable for moderate-intensity zones (3, 4), and type C is suitable for severe-intensity zones (5).
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An Equivalent Truss Method for the Analysis of Timber Diaphragms

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue112
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Smith, Tobias
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Diaphragms
Equivalent Truss Method
Fasteners
Forces
Deflection
Torsion
Conference
Pacific Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
November 6-8, 2015, Sydney, Australia
Summary
Recent years have seen more architects and clients asking for tall timber buildings. In response, an ambitious timber community has been proposing challenging plans and ideas for multi-storey commercial and residential timber buildings. While engineers have been intensively looking at gravity-load-carrying elements as well as walls, frames and cores to resist lateral loads, floor diaphragms have been largely neglected. Complex floor geometries and long span floor diaphragms create stress concentrations, high force demand and potentially large deformations. There is a lack of guidance and regulation regarding the analysis and design of timber diaphragms so structural engineers need a practical alternative to simplistic equivalent deep beam analysis or costly finite element modelling. This paper proposes an equivalent truss method capable of solving complex geometries for both light timber framing and massive timber diaphragms. Floor panels are discretized by equivalent diagonals, having the same stiffness as the panel including its fasteners. With this method the panel unit shear forces (shear flow) and therefore fastener demand, chord forces and reaction forces can be evaluated. Because panel stiffness is accounted for, diaphragm deflection, torsional effects and transfer forces can also be assessed.
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APA Engineered Wood Construction Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3089
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
General Information
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Roofs
Organization
APA
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Roofs
Topic
Design and Systems
General Information
Keywords
Selection and Specification
Structural Composite Lumber
I-Joist
Engineered Wood Products
Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Comprehensive guide to engineered wood construction systems for both residential and commercial/industrial buildings. Includes information on plywood and oriented strand board (wood structural panels), glulam, I-joists, structural composite lumber, typical specifications and design recommendations for floor, wall and roof systems, diaphragms, shear walls, fire-rated systems and methods of finishing.
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Assessment of Connections in Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings Regarding Structural Robustness

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1948
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Huber, Johannes
Ekevad, Mats
Berg, Sven
Girhammar, Ulf
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Method
Deformation
Multi-Storey
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 20-23, 2018, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Summary
Cross-laminated timber makes timber buildings with an increasing number of storeys achievable. With more storeys, structural robustness needs more attention to make a building survive unforeseen events (e.g. accidents, terrorism) and save lives. For steel and concrete buildings, design methods for robustness focus on connection details. The assessment of joints in cross-laminated timber buildings regarding robustness is rather limited in the literature. The objective of this paper is to conduct an initial assessment of the connectors after the removal of a wall in a platform cross-laminated timber building. We used the finite element method and the component method for the analysis of a case building. The results indicate that the wall-to-wall and the floor-to-floor connectors may fail at low deflection levels leading to high shear loads in the floor panel above the removed wall, which might induce cracking. The removal analysis was only partially completed, but we identified an indication of the deformation behaviour of the case building. Testing and refined modelling of the connections is needed in the future to verify the results. This study may facilitate future investigations regarding robustness of multi-storey cross-laminated timber buildings.
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Behaviour of Mechanically Laminated CLT Members

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue291
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kuklík, Petr
Velebil, Lukáš
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Stress
Torsional Stiffness
Slip Modulus
Lamination
Conference
International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies
Research Status
Complete
Notes
September 30-October 2 2015, Riga, Latvia
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) is one of the structural building systems based on the lamination of multiple layers, where each layer is oriented perpendicularly to each other. Recent requirements are placed to develop an alternative process based on the mechanical lamination of the layers, which is of particular interest to our research group at the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings. The goal is to develop and verify the behaviour of mechanically laminated CLT wall panels exposed to shear stresses in the plane. The shear resistance of mechanically jointed CLT is ensured by connecting the layers by screws. The paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of the torsional stiffness and the slip modulus of crossing areas for different numbers of orthogonally connected layers. The results of the experiments were compared with the current analytical model.
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Behaviour of Multi-Storey Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings Under Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2715
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Hughes, Claire
Publisher
Queen's University Belfast
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loading
Tall Wood
Tall Timber Buildings
Connections
Monotonic Loading Tests
Constant Vertical Load
Wall Systems
Experimental Tests
Analytical Approach
Multi-Storey
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In response to the global drive towards sustainable construction, CLT has emerged as a competitive alternative to other construction materials. CLT buildings taller than 10-storeys and CLT buildings in regions of moderate to high seismicity would be subject to higher lateral loads due to wind and earthquakes than CLT buildings which have already been completed. The lack of structural design codes and limited literature regarding the performance of CLT buildings under lateral loading are barriers to the adoption of CLT for buildings which could experience high lateral loading. Previous research into the behaviour of CLT buildings under lateral loading has involved testing of building components. These studies have generally been limited to testing wall systems and connections which replicate configurations at ground floor storeys in buildings no taller than three storeys. Consequently, to develop the understanding of the performance of multi-storey CLT buildings under lateral loading, the performance of wall systems and connections which replicate conditions of those in above ground floor storeys in buildings taller than three storeys were experimentally investigated. The testing of typical CLT connections involved testing eighteen configurations under cyclic loading in shear and tension. The results of this experimental investigation highlighted the need for capacity-based design of CLT connections to prevent brittle failure. It was found that both hold down and angle bracket connections have strength and stiffness in shear and tension and by considering the strength of the connections in both directions, more economical design of CLT buildings could be achieved. The testing of CLT wall systems involved testing three CLT wall systems with identical configurations under monotonic lateral load and constant vertical load, with vertical loads replicating gravity loads at storeys within a 10-storey CLT building. The results show that vertical load has a significant influence on wall system behaviour; varying the vertical load was found to vary the contribution of deformation mechanisms to global behaviour within the elastic region, reinforcing the need to consider connection design at each individual storey. As there are still no structural design codes for CLT buildings, the accuracy of analytical methods presented within the literature for predicting the behaviour of CLT connections and wall systems under lateral loading was assessed. It was found that the analytical methods for both connections and wall systems are highly inaccurate and do not reflect experimentally observed behaviour.
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Bending and Rolling Shear Properties of Cross-Laminated Timber Fabricated with Canadian Hemlock

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2407
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ruan, Gengmu
Xiong, Haibei
Chen, Jiawei
Organization
Tongji University
Publisher
Tech Science Press
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Rolling Shear
Failure Modes
Bonding Line
Bending
Research Status
Complete
Series
Structural Durability & Health Monitoring
Summary
In this paper, bending performance and rolling shear properties of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels made from Canadian hemlock were investigated by varied approaches. Firstly, three groups of bending tests of three-layer CLT panels with different spans were carried out. Different failure modes were obtained: bending failure, rolling shear failure, bonding line failure, local failure of the outer layer and mixed failure mode. Deflection and strain measurements were employed to calculate the global and local modulus of elastic (MOE), compared with the theoretical value. In addition, a modified compression shear testing method was introduced to evaluate the rolling shear strength and modulus, compared with the results from strain measurements in bending shear tests. According to testing results, bonding line failure and rolling shear failure were dominant failure modes in bending tests, and the theoretical value of bending property was beyond the average level of the calculating results obtained from both deflection and strain measurements. In addition, the rolling shear strength and modulus obtained from compression shear tests were relatively smaller than those from bending tests.
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Buckling of Cross Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1615
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Perret, Olivier
Douthe, Cyril
Lebée, Arthur
Sab, Karam
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Linear Buckling
Finite Element
Buckling Loads
Boundary Conditions
Bending-Gradient theory
Transverse Shear Effects
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2360-2367
Summary
In this paper, the linear buckling of Cross Laminated Timber walls is investigated. A 3D numerical study using finite-elements is presented for several Cross Laminated Timber geometries, ply configurations and boundary conditions. First, it is shown that critical buckling loads are close to the material failure load which proves the necessity of a design model for the buckling of Cross Laminated Timber panels. Second, through a comparison between soft simple support boundary conditions and conventional hard simple support conditions, it is shown that this distinction could be taken into account for designing timber structures depending on the accuracy needed. Third, several plate models, particularly the Bending-Gradient theory, are compared to these 3D reference results. It is observed that for varying plate geometries and arrangements, the Bending-Gradient theory predicts more precisely the critical load of CLT panels than classical lamination and first-order shear deformation theories. Finally, it is demonstrated that one of the suggested projections of the Bending-Gradient on a Reissner-Mindlin model gives very accurate results and could favorably allow the development of engineering recommendations to estimate properly transverse shear effects.
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Buildings Made of Dowel-Laminated Timber: Joint and Shear Wall Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1718
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Connections
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Sandhaas, Carmen
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Joints
Load Carrying Capacity
Cyclic Tests
Energy Dissipation
Behaviour Factors
Numerical Models
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4589-4596
Summary
Dowel-laminated timber (DLT) elements consist of lamellae arranged side-by-side that are connected with beech dowels. Due to the glue-free DLT element layup, joints and shear walls potentially suffer from considerable reduction of stiffness and load carrying capacity as metal fasteners inserted perpendicular to the element plane may be placed in gaps between the single lamellae. Tests on typical joints showed that, depending on the fastener diameter, the remaining load carrying capacity of joints in DLT in comparison to joints in solid wood may be only 25%. Tests on DLT shear walls with different sheeting proved that the use of DLT structures as shear walls is only possible if at least one-sided sheeting is used. Cyclic tests on DLT shear walls demonstrated that the DLT construction typology has energy dissipation properties similar to traditional timber frame construction. Analogously, preliminary behaviour factors for DLT buildings evaluated with numerical models were also similar to those for timber frame buildings.
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Capacity-Based Design for Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1255
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Shahnewaz, Md
Tannert, Thomas
Alam, Shahria
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
In-Plane Stiffness
Strength
Non-Linear Springs
Finite Element Analysis
Hysteretic Behaviour
Cyclic Loading
Conference
Structures Congress 2017
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 6–8, 2017, Denver, Colorado
Summary
The use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) in residential and non-residential buildings is becoming increasingly popular in North America. While the 2016 supplement to the 2014 edition of the Canadian Standard for Engineering Design in Wood, CSAO86, provides provisions for CLT structures used in platform type applications, it does not provide guidance for the in-plane stiffness and strength of CLT shearwalls. The research presented in this paper investigated the in-plane stiffness and strength of CLT shearwalls with different connections for platform-type construction. Finite element analyses were conducted where the CLT panels were modelled as an orthotropic elastic material, and non-linear springs were used for the connections. The hysteretic behaviour of the connections under cyclic loading was calibrated from quasi-static tests; the full model of wall assemblies was calibrated using experimental tests on CLT shearwalls. A parametric study was conducted that evaluated the change of strength and stiffness of walls with the change in a number of connectors. Finally, a capacity-based design procedure is proposed that provides engineers with guidance for designing platform-type CLT buildings. The philosophy of the procedure is to design the CLT buildings such that all non-linear deformations and energy dissipation occurs in designated connections, while all other connections and the CLT panels are designed with sufficient over-strength to remain linear elastic.
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Carterton Events Centre Auditorium Pres-Lam Wall Design and Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue38
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Dekker, Dave
Chung, Stanley
Palermo, Alessandro
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Post-Tensioned
Pres-Lam
Sustainability
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
Driven by sustainability, locally available resources and expertise, and economy, the design of the Carterton Events Centre focused on timber for the majority of the main structural and non-structural components. Combined with a client desire for minimization of earthquake damage, dissipative post-tensioned rocking Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) shear walls (Pres-Lam) were considered for the lateral load resisting system. During design development various structural forms were explored and tested through costing to determine an economic design solution meeting the project drivers. Advanced numerical analyses carried out by the University of Canterbury validated the design process assuring confidence with the design of the technology.
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Chinese High Rise Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with CLT Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2899
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Contiguglia, Carlotta
Pelle, Angelo
Lai, Zhichao
Briseghella, Bruno
Nuti, Camillo
Organization
Roma Tre University
Fuzhou University
Editor
Rosa, Maria
Masi, Angelo
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Retrofitting
Energy Efficiency
Architectural Improvement
Reinforced Concrete
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) panels have been gaining increasing attention in the construction field as a diaphragm in mid- to high-rise building projects. Moreover, in the last few years, due to their seismic performances, low environmental impact, ease of construction, etc., many research studies have been conducted about their use as infill walls in hybrid construction solutions. With more than a half of the megacities in the world located in seismic regions, there is an urgent need of new retrofitting methods that can improve the seismic behavior of the buildings, upgrading, at the same time, the architectural aspects while minimizing the environmental impact and costs associated with the common retrofit solutions. In this work, the seismic, energetic, and architectural rehabilitation of tall reinforced concrete (RC) buildings using CLT panels are investigated. An existing 110 m tall RC frame building located in Huizhou (China) was chosen as a case study. The first objective was to investigate the performances of the building through the non-linear static analysis (push-over analysis) used to define structural weaknesses with respect to earthquake actions. The architectural solution proposed for the building is the result of the combination between structural and architectonic needs: internal spaces and existing facades were re-designed in order to improve not only the seismic performances but also energy efficiency, quality of the air, natural lighting, etc. A full explanation of the FEM modeling of the cross laminated timber panels is reported in the following. Non-linear FEM models of connections and different wall configurations were validated through a comparison with available lab tests, and finally, a real application on the existing 3D building was discussed.
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