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167 records – page 1 of 17.

Flexural behaviour of a new timber-concrete composite structural flooring system. Full scale testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3314
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Martín-Gutiérrez, Emilio
Estévez-Cimadevila, Javier
Suárez-Riestra, Félix
Otero-Chans, Dolores
Organization
University of Coruña
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Timber Flooring System
Flexural Behaviour
Four-point Bending Test
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
Timber-concrete composite systems are a high-performance alternative for building floors, of great interest in the current context of environmental concerns. Looking for a more eco-friendly solution, the paper presents a new flooring system with a wood-concrete connection that does not require adhesives or special metal elements. Four-point bending tests were performed on TCC flooring samples with a span of 6.0, 7.2 and 8.4 m. Its cross section was a prefabricated piece in the shape of an inverted T made up of a lower glulam flange, glued together with a central plywood rib with aligned holes in its upper part that go through the entire thickness of the plywood. The set was completed with a top layer of poured-in-place concrete. The connection between both materials is achieved by penetrating the concrete into the rib holes. Additionally, corrugated steel bars were placed through said holes to achieve ductile behaviour. In all cases, a slenderness ratio of L/24 was used. The experimental results showed that the lowest value of ultimate load obtained was 4.3 times higher than the total service load estimated for a building for public use (9 kN/m2). The maximum deflection of the total load was between L/573 and L/709 for the loads corresponding to a building for public use (9 kN/m2) and between L/1069 and L/1340 for the case of residential type building (5 kN/m2). An analysis of the effects of vibrations in the service limit state in relation to user comfort has been included. The results indicate that the system satisfies the requirements for the intended uses. Consequently, the proposed solution shows its effectiveness both in terms of strength and stiffness for the construction of light floors, being easy to build and having high performance.
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Comparative CO2 emissions of concrete and timber slabs with equivalent structural performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3345
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Author
Oh, Jae-Won
Park, Keum-Sung
Kim, Hyeon Soo
Kim, Ik
Pang, Sung-Jun
Ahn, Kyung-Sun
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Organization
Seoul National University
Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide
Reinforced Concrete
Structural Performance
Environmental Product Declaration
Research Status
Complete
Series
Energy and Buildings
Summary
Comparing the environmental impacts of building materials at the building level can be biased because a building design is optimized for a primary structural material. To achieve objective comparisons, this study compares the environmental impact of reinforced concrete (RC), cross-laminated timber (CLT), and timber-concrete composite (TCC) at the component level with equivalent structural performance. A slab was selected as the target structure member because its design does not consider lateral forces. Equivalent structural performance was defined as the minimum quantity of slab materials for comparable span and live load conditions. The functional unit for this study was defined as a 1 m2 slab. The system boundary covered the cradle-to-gate perspective, including raw material extraction, transportation, and manufacturing. The structural design method and material design values followed the Korean building code and standards. Environmental product declaration data developed in Korea were used to evaluate the carbon footprint. The CLT emitted 75 % less carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gases responsible for anthropogenic climate change, compared with RC regardless of conditions, while the TCC emitted 65 % less CO2, and its environmental impact improved as the span lengthened. The results also indicated that timber slabs are thinner than concrete slabs and can be structurally rational.
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Experimental and theoretical investigation on shear performances of glued-in perforated steel plate connections for prefabricated timber–concrete composite beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3373
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Floors
Author
Yang, Huifeng
Lu, Yan
Ling, Xiu
Tao, Haotian
Shi, Benkai
Organization
Nanjing Tech University
Southeast University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Glued-in Perforated Steel Plate
Prefabricated Concrete Slab
Slip Modulus
Experimental Study
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Construction Materials
Summary
Glued-in perforated steel plate (GIPSP) connections demonstrate significant shear strength and high slip modulus. Consequently, they indicate substantial potential for application in timber–concrete composite (TCC) structures according to the emerging tendencies in high-storey and large-span buildings. However, the application pattern in prefabricated TCC structures and the theoretical analysis of the shear performances of GIPSP connections are highly deficient. This hinders the application of this type of shear connection. In this study, the shear performances of GIPSP connections were evaluated using push-out tests. Ten groups of push-out specimens with different steel plate numbers, steel plate lengths, and concrete slab types were tested. The concrete slab types investigated in the experiments included a prefabricated concrete slab and cast-in-situ concrete slab. The experimental results were discussed in terms of the failure mode, load-carrying capacity, and slip modulus. The theoretical models for the load-carrying capacity related to the associate failure mode were discussed based on an analysis of the failure mechanisms. In addition, design proposals with regard to the load-carrying capacity and slip modulus of the GIPSP connection were presented. The research results can provide design guidance for TCC beams using GIPSP connections and prefabricated concrete slabs.
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Dimensional behavior of nail-laminated timber-concrete composite caused by changes in ambient air, and correlation among temperature, relative humidity, and strain

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3374
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Moisture
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Author
Hwang, Sung-Wook
Chung, Hyunwoo
Lee, Taekyeong
Ahm, Kyung-Sun
Pang, Sung-Jun
Kim, Ji Yong
Bang, Junsik
Jung, Minjung
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Kwak, Hyo Won
Yeo, Hwanmyeong
Organization
Seoul National University
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Journal Article
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Correlation
Dimensional Change
Moisture Content
Monitoring
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) slab composed of nail-laminated timber (NLT) and topping concrete (TC) was developed for flooring applications. The NLT was laminated alternately with lumber and plywood. To investigate the dimensional behavior of the TCC slab, the temperature, relative humidity (RH), and dimensional changes of the slab exposed to outdoor air were monitored for 205 days. Temperature change was directly transmitted to both components, and RH change was gradually transmitted to the NLT. Concrete pouring caused a sharp increase in NLT width, which was the laminating direction of the nails. This resulted from swelling of the wood because of the moisture in the concrete mixture and loosening of the nail lamination. The member composition for the nail-laminating system, fastener type, and concrete volume help to secure the dimensional stability of the NLT. Cracks in the TC caused width deformation, which was recovered by drying shrinkage of the TC. Correlation analysis among temperature, RH, and strain indicated that dimensional changes in NLT correlated strongly with RH, while those in TC correlated strongly with temperature. The correlation between longitudinal strain in the TC and strain in the three directions of the NLT was attributed to the notches designed for mechanical connection.
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Experimental analysis of timber-concrete composite behaviour with synthetic fibres

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3396
Year of Publication
2023
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Buka-Vaivade, K
Serdjuks, D
Zvirina, D
Pakrastins, L
Organization
Riga Technical University
Publisher
IOP Publishing
Year of Publication
2023
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Synthetic Fibre
Bending Test
Conference
5th International Conference: Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies (IMST 2022)
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
Summary
With the growing importance of the principles of sustainable construction, the use of load-bearing timber-concrete composite structures is becoming increasingly popular. Timber-concrete composite offers wider possibilities for the use of timber in construction, especially for large-span structures. The most significant benefit from combining these materials can be obtained by providing a rigid connection between the timber and concrete layers, which can be obtained by the adhesive timber-to-concrete connection produced by the proposed stone chips method. A sustainable solution involves the abandonment of steel longitudinal reinforcement. The use of such a solution in practice is often associated with fears of a fragile collapse. Therefore, the issue of how to increase the safety factor of the proposed material is topical now. The experimental investigation is made to determine the effect of synthetic fibre use on timber-concrete composite behaviour by testing a series of timber-concrete composite specimens with and without fibres in the concrete layer. The obtained results show that adding 0.5 % of synthetic macro fibres allows to abandon the use of longitudinal steel reinforcement and prevents the formation of large cracks in concrete and the disintegration of the concrete layer in case of collapse.
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Prediction of bending performance for a separable CLT-concrete composite slab connected by notch connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2931
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Pang, Sung-Jun
Ahn, Kyung-Sun
Jeong, Seok-man
Lee, Gun-Cheol
Kim, Hyeon Soo
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Organization
Seoul National University
Korea National University of Transportation
Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Composite Slab
Bending Strength
Notched Connection
Round Notch
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
In this study, the bending performance of a separable cross-laminated timber (CLT)–concrete composite slab for reducing environmental impact was investigated. The slab has consisted of CLT and eco–concrete, and round-notch shape shear connectors resist the shear force between the CLT and eco-concrete. The eco–concrete was composed of a high-sulfated calcium silicate (HSCS) cement, which ensures low energy consumption in the production process. The bending stiffness and load-carrying capacities of the slab were theoretically predicted based on the shear properties of the notch connectors and validated with an experimental test. The shear properties of two types of notch shear connectors (Ø100 mm and Ø200 mm) were measured by planar shear tests. As a result, the stochastically predicted bending stiffness of the slab (with Ø100 mm shear connector) was 0.364 × 1012 N mm2, which was almost similar to test data. The load-carrying capacities of the slab were governed by the shear failure of the notch connectors, and the lower fifth percentile point estimate (5% PE) was 21.9 kN, which was 7.9% higher than the prediction (20.2 kN). In a parameter study, the effect of notch diameter for the CLT-concrete slab span was analyzed depending on the applied loads, and the maximum spans of the slab with Ø100 mm notch or Ø200 mm notch were not significantly different.
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Development of Creep Deformations during Service Life: A Comparison of CLT and TCC Floor Constructions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2955
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Binder, Eva
Derkowski, Wit
Bader, Thomas
Organization
Linnæus University
Editor
Brandner, Reinhard
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Serviceability Limit State
Gamma Method
Linear Viscoelasticity
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) slabs in residential buildings need additional weight, e.g., in the form of screeds or gravel layers, to fulfill the criterion for the highest impact-sound class. The additional mass is, however, not exploited for the load bearing behavior, but adds additional weight and leads to an increased height of the floor construction. In this study, such a CLT floor construction with a construction height of 380 mm is compared with a composite slab consisting of a CLT plate with a concrete layer on top with a floor construction height of 330 mm. The timber concrete composite (TCC) slab has a different creep behavior than the CLT slab. Thus, the development of the time-dependent deflections over the service life are of interest. A straightforward hybrid approach is developed, which exploits advanced multiscale-based material models for the individual composite layers and a standardized structural analysis method for the structural slab to model its linear creep behavior. The introduced approach allows to investigate load redistribution between the layers of the composite structure and the evolution of the deflection of the slab during the service life. The investigated slab types show a similar deflection after 50 years, while the development of the deflections over time are different. The CLT slab has a smaller overall stiffness at the beginning but a smaller decrease in stiffness over time than the investigated TCC slab.
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Timber-concrete composite structural flooring system

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3065
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Estévez-Cimadevila, J.
Martín-Gutiérrez, E.
Suárez-Riestra, F.
Otero-Chans, D.
Vázquez-Rodríguez, J. A.
Organization
Universidade da Coruña
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber Flooring System
Mixed Beams
Shear Connector
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Building Engineering
Summary
An integrated solution is presented for the execution of building structures using timber-concrete composite (TCC) sections that make efficient use of the mechanical properties of both materials. The system integrates flooring and shaped prefabricated beams composed of a lower flange of glued laminated timber (GLT) glued to one or more plywood or laminated veneer lumber (LVL) ribs and linked to an upper concrete slab poured in situ. The parts may be prefabricated in T shape (only one rib), in p shape (two ribs), or with multiple ribs to create wider pieces, thereby reducing installation operations. The basis of the system is the timber-concrete shear connection in the form of holes through the ribs, which are filled by the in situ-poured concrete. The connection is complemented with the arrangement of reinforcement bars through the holes. Three test campaigns were undertaken. Shear tests of the timber-concrete connection in 12 test pieces. Shear test along the wood-wood glue line (72 planes tested) and wood -plywood (24 planes tested). Delamination test of the glued planes (24 wood-wood planes and 8 wood-plywood planes). The results indicate a high strength joint, with ductile failure and high composite effect. Likewise, the shear test results along the glue line and the delamination tests show section integrity under demanding hygrothermal conditions. Preliminary sizing curves were developed considering the Gamma Method to evaluate the performance of the system. The results show the possibilities of the system, as pouring the upper slab concrete in situ makes it possible to create continuous semi-rigid joints between the elements. This gives rise to slender flooring structures, light and with high stiffness plane against horizontal forces.
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Cost Factor Analysis for Timber–Concrete Composite with a Lightweight Plywood Rib Floor Panel

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3100
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Cost
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Buka-Vaivade, Karina
Serdjuks, Dmitrijs
Pakrastins, Leonids
Organization
Riga Technical University
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Adhesive Connection
Plywood Rib Panel
Floor Vibrations
Rigid Connection
Fibre Reinforced Concrete
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
With the growing importance of the principle of sustainability, there is an increasing interest in the use of timber–concrete composite for floors, especially for medium and large span buildings. Timber–concrete composite combines the better properties of both materials and reduces their disadvantages. The most common choice is to use a cross-laminated timber panel as a base for a timber–concrete composite. But a timber–concrete composite solution with plywood rib panels with an adhesive connection between the timber base and fibre reinforced concrete layer is offered as the more cost-effective constructive solution. An algorithm for determining the rational parameters of the panel cross-section has been developed. The software was written based on the proposed algorithm to compare timber–concrete composite panels with cross-laminated timber and plywood rib panel bases. The developed algorithm includes recommendations of forthcoming Eurocode 5 for timber–concrete composite design and an innovative approach to vibration calculations. The obtained data conclude that the proposed structural solution has up to 73% lower cost and up to 71% smaller self-weight. Thus, the proposed timber–concrete composite construction can meet the needs of society for cost-effective and sustainable innovative floor solutions.
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Behavior of timber-concrete composite with defects in adhesive connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3108
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Buka-Vaivade, Karina
Serdjuks, Dmitrijs
Organization
Riga Technical University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive Connection
Rigid Connection
Conference
ICSI 2021 The 4th International Conference on Structural Integrity
Research Status
Complete
Series
Procedia Structural Integrity
Summary
Rigid timber to concrete connection is the most effective solution for timber-concrete composite members subjected to the flexure which provides full composite action and better structural behaviour. One of the most used technologies to produce glued connection of the timber-concrete composite is “dry” method, which includes gluing together of timber and precast concrete slab. This technique has high risk of forming a poor-quality rigid connection in timber-concrete composite, and there are difficulties in controlling the quality of the glued connection. The effect of the non-glued areas in connection between composite layers on the shear stresses and energy absorption were investigated by finite element method and laboratorian experiment. Three timber-concrete composite panels in combination with carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite tapes in the tension zone with the span 1.8 m were statically loaded till the failure by the scheme of three-point bending. Mid-span displacements were measured in the bending test. One specimen was produced by dry method, by gluing together cross-laminated timber panel and prefabricated concrete panel. Timber-concrete qualitative connection of the other two specimens was provided by the granite chips, which were glued on the surface of the cross-laminated timber by epoxy, and then wet concrete was placed. Dimensions of the crushed granite pieces changes within the limits from 16 to 25 mm. The investigated panel with different amount and sizes of non-glued areas in the timber to concrete connection was numerically modelled. Obtained results shown, that the increase of shear stresses is influenced not so much by a total amount of non-glued areas, but by the size of the individual defective areas. Moreover, large non-glued areas significantly reduce the energy absorption of elements subjected to the flexure, which was observed experimentally for defective panel produced by the classical dry method with almost 4 times larger mid-span displacements than for panel with full composite action provided by the proposed production technology of the timber to concrete rigid connection. So, the proposed technology based on the use of granite chips, provides a high-quality connection between timber and concrete layers, with insignificant ration between possible defect and total connection surface area, which is equal to the area of one granite chips edge.
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167 records – page 1 of 17.