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67 records – page 2 of 7.

Design and Behavior of a Mid-Rise Cross-Laminated Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue242
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Lenon, Conor
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Shake Table Test
Full Scale
Moment Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Design of an Energy-Efficient and Cost-Effective Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) House in Waikuku Beach, New Zealand

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2364
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Bournique, Guillaume
Publisher
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Cost-Competitive
Residential
Housing
Energy Consumption
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 caused significant damage to the Christchurch building stock. However, it is an opportunity to build more comfortable and energy efficient buildings. Previous research suggests a tendency to both under heat and spot heat, meaning that New Zealand dwellings are partly heated and winter indoor temperatures do not always meet the recommendations of the World Health Organization. Those issues are likely to be explained by design deficiency, poor thermal envelope, and limitations of heating systems. In that context, the thesis investigates the feasibility of building an energy efficient and cost-competitive house in Christchurch. Although capital costs for an energy efficient house are inevitably higher, they are balanced with lower operating costs and improved thermal comfort. The work is supported by a residential building project using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. This atypical project is compared with a typical New Zealand house (reference building), regarding both energy efficiency and costs. The current design of the CLT building is discussed according to passive design strategies, and a range of improvements for the building design is proposed. This final design proposal is determined by prioritizing investments in design options having the greatest effect on the building overall energy consumption. Building design features include windows efficiencies, insulation levels, optimized thermal mass, lighting fixture, as well as HVAC and domestic hot water systems options. The improved case for the CLT building is simulated having a total energy consumption of 4,860kWh/year, which corresponds to a remarkable 60% energy savings over the baseline. The construction cost per floor area is slightly higher for the CLT building, about 2,900$/m² against 2,500$/m² for the timber framed house. But a life cycle cost analysis shows that decreased operating costs makes the CLT house cost-competitive over its lifetime. The thesis suggests that the life cycle cost of the CLT house is 14% less than that of the reference building, while the improved CLT design reaches about 22% costs savings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Developing a Design Procedure for Cross Laminated Timber Mats

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2368
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Torra, Ines
Publisher
University of Illinois at Chicago
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Finite Element Analysis
Damage Models
Design Procedure
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated Timber (CLT), a new generation of engineered wood product developed initially in Europe, is a relatively innovative building system of interest in the North American construction and is helping to define a new class of timber products known as massive or “mass” timber. This material has been gaining popularity in residential and non-residential applications in several countries due to many advantages it can offer: high dimension stability, high strength and stiffness, high level of prefabrication, fire resistant, cost and energy efficient, renewable and biodegradable, sustainable, and good thermal and sound insulator. However, CLT represents a complicated material whose behavior is difficult to predict in various applications and requires care from the engineers and researchers. Due to the increase of the use of CLT mats for industrial, construction and environmental applications, CLT mats are currently used in industrial applications, this study presents the analysis and behavior of such mats. Three-dimensional non-linear finite element models, using ANSYS, have been created, analyzed and compared with previous experimental work previously performed to validate the models. The model includes detailed modeling, analysis and investigation of the wood material supported by soil. This research shows a non-linear finite element analysis model that can predict CLT behavior. Damage models of CLT is used to determine the failure modes of this material. The analysis results are compared with current industrial practices published guides and highlight the limitations of such procedures. Lastly, a design procedure was developed for the analysis of different configurations such mats.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1891
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames

Disproportionate Collapse Prevention Analyses for Mid-Rise Cross-Laminated Timber Platform-Type Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2288
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Wood Building Systems

Dynamic Analysis of the FFTT System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue138
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Effect of Blue Stain on Bond Shear Resistance of Polyurethane Resins Used for Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2280
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application

Emission of Particulate Matters During Construction: A Comparative Study on a Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) and a Steel Building Construction Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2282
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Ahmed, Shafayet
Arocho, Ingrid
Publisher
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Steel
Pollutants
Construction Sites
PM Emission
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Environmental Assessment of the Production and End-of-Life of Cross-Laminated Timber in Western Washington

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2299
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chen, Cindy Xiaoning
Publisher
University of Washington
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
End of Life
Life Cycle Analysis
Life-Cycle Assessment
Waste Reduction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Evaluation of the Bonding Quality of E. grandis Cross-Laminated Timber Made With a One-Component Polyurethane Adhesive

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2369
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Author
Dugmore, Michael
Publisher
Stellenbosch University
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
South Africa
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
General Application
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Polyurethane
Panels
Bond Performance
Bond Quality
Durability Assessment
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Eucalyptus grandis is South Africa‘s most important commercial hardwood species. The availability of E. grandis and its fast growth rate creates the opportunity to explore its uses further. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prefabricated multilayer engineered panel product made of at least three layers, with the grain direction of some or all of the consecutive layers orthogonally orientated. In order to add value to E. grandis, reduce the export of low-cost chips, increase the profit margins of local plantation owners and create jobs, the development of E. grandis CLT in South Africa may be an option. There is concern among some researchers that the bonding quality evaluation tests proposed by CLT standards have been developed for glulam and are too severe for CLT. These researchers proposed that further analysis and possibly even revision of the test methods should be considered. There is also a need to evaluate the mechanical properties of CLT panels made of E. grandis to completely understand the structural performance of these panels, including their bond quality and durability, and therefore be able to rely on E. grandis CLT as a construction material. The objectives of this study were: . To evaluate the face-bonding quality of CLT panels from E. grandis timber bonded with a one component polyurethane resin; . To determine the influence of material and processing parameters on the face-bonding quality of CLT manufactured from E. grandis timber bonded with a one component polyurethane resin; . To analyse different testing methods for evaluating the face-bonding quality of CLT. The design for this experiment consisted of eight groups with different combinations of parameters for density, grooves and pressure per group. Four different testing methods were used to evaluate the face-bonding quality of CLT panels from E. grandis and to determine the effect of parameters on face-bonding quality: A delamination test on 100 x 100 mm block specimens (Test A), a shear test on 40 x 40 mm specimens (Test B), a shear test on 40 x 40 mm specimens with grain direction 45° to load direction (Test C) and a combined delamination and shear test on 70 x 70 mm specimens with grain direction 45° to load direction (Test D). Results of the statistical analysis indicated that E. grandis CLT made with 1C-PUR adhesive can obtain excellent face-bonding quality using a clamping pressure of 0.7 MPa and with no stress relief grooves present. All samples passed the shear test (Test B) which is the reference test method proposed by EN 16351 (2015). It was found that a strength component and durability component will be an advantage when testing the bond quality of CLT. Shear tests at 45° to the load direction did not completely eliminate the rolling shear effect. The combined delamination and shear test (Test D), seems to have potential as a good test for bond quality since it is a combination of a durability and shear strength test. There are still questions about the relative advantages of specific test methods for bond quality, especially on the effect of rolling shear. Further work should focus on this aspect and the use of stress models might be a way of gaining further insights.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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67 records – page 2 of 7.