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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Acoustical Guide: Acoustic Research Report on Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1839
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Floors

CLT Handbook - Canadian Edition

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue819
Edition
2nd Edition
Year of Publication
2019
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
FPInnovations
Editor
Karacabeyli, Erol
Gagnon, Sylvain
Edition
2nd Edition
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The CLT Handbook provides vital “How to” information on CLT for the design and construction community, and is a great source of information for regulatory authorities, fire services and others. The CLT Handbook is also a good textbook for university level timber engineering courses. In summary, the Canadian CLT Handbook will remain the most comprehensive reference for sharing the latest technical information on North American CLT. The Canadian edition of the CLT Handbook, first published in 2011 under the Transformative Technologies Program of the Natural Resources Canada, played an imperative role in accelerating the use and acceptance of CLT in North America. Its introduction subsequently led to the publication of the US Edition. The Canadian Edition supported the early use of CLT products from Canadian manufacturers in many small to large projects across Canada and the US, and paved the way for CLT and other wood products to be used in new applications like tall and large buildings, and bridges. Since then, additional research has taken place globally and substantial regulatory changes have occurred enabling more wood to be used in construction. Those developments highlighted a need for the CLT Handbook to be updated. The 2019 Edition of the CLT Handbook, for example, augments the recently developed CLT provisions in CSA Standard in Engineering Design in Wood and it includes a design example of an 8-storey CLT building. It helps expand the knowledge base of the designers about CLT enabling them to develop alternative solutions for taller and larger buildings that are beyond the boundaries of the acceptable solutions in building codes.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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CLT Handbook - US Edition

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue832
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
FPInnovations
Binational Softwood Lumber Council
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
United States
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
General Information
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
CLT Handbook - US Edition
Summary
The U.S. edition of the CLT Handbook is a 572-page guide and is the definitive handbook on cross-laminated timber (CLT), covering manufacturing, structural design, connections, fire and environmental performance and the lifting and handling of CLT elements.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2460
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Acoustics and Vibration
Fire
Keywords
Shear Connection
Ultimate Limit States
Vibration
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As part of its research work on wood buildings, FPInnovations has recently launched a Design Guide for Timber-Concrete Composite Floors in Canada. This technique, far from being new, could prove to be a cost-competitive solution for floors with longer-span since the mechanical properties of the two materials act in complementarity. Timber-concrete systems consist of two distinct layers, a timber layer and a concrete layer (on top), joined together by shear connectors. The properties of both materials are then better exploited since tension forces from bending are mainly resisted by the timber, while compression forces from bending are resisted by the concrete. This guide, which contains numerous illustrations and formulas to help users better plan their projects, addresses many aspects of the design of timber-concrete composite floors, for example shear connection systems, ultimate limit state design, vibration and fire resistance of floors, and much more.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Directives and Explanatory Guide for Mass Timber Buildings of up to 12 Storeys

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1969
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Veilleux, Lise
Gagnon, Sylvain
Dagenais, Christian
Publisher
Régie du bâtiment du Québec
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Wood
Multi-Storey
Construction
Fire Resistance Rating
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
978-2-550-74728-4 (printed); 978-2-550-74731-4 (PDF)
Summary
This document is a translation of the “Bâtiments de construction massive en bois d’au plus 12 étages” Guide published in August 2015. In the event of discrepancies, the French version prevails.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction: Guidelines for Encapsulation Details and Techniques

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2600
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Geraghty, Simon
Jeske, Judy
Rahmani, Alma
Dorsey, Cheryl
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
EMTC
Fire Protection
Construction Safety
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of this guide is to provide an introduction to the concept of encapsulated mass timber construction. This guide provides an overview of encapsulation techniques for mass timber construction, and other related fire protection measures, and summarizes some approved encapsulation materials and application methods and identifies additional requirements for safety during construction. This guide is intended to help architects, engineers and designers by reducing uncertainty and allowing for more confidence in design, as well as providing authorities having jurisdiction and inspectors with a reference for simple design review.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2620
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Finch, Graham
Wang, J.
Ricketts, D.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Thermal Performance
Multi-Family
Residential Buildings
Energy Efficiency
Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Guide for Designing Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures for Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Marine to Cold Climate Zones in North America was developed by FPInnovations in collaboration with RDH Building Engineering Ltd., the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing, and the Canadian Wood Council. The project is part of efforts within the Advanced Building Systems Program of FPInnovations to assemble and add to the knowledge base regarding Canadian wood products and building systems. The team of the Advanced Building Systems Program works with members and partners of FPInnovations to address critical technical issues that threaten existing markets for wood products or which limit expansion or access to such new markets. This guide was developed in response to the rapidly changing energy-efficiency requirements for buildings across Canada and the United States. This guide serves two major objectives: To assist architects, engineers, designers and builders in improving the thermal performance of building enclosures of wood multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs), in response to the increasingly stringent requirements for the energy efficiency of buildings in the marine to cold climate zones in North America (U.S. DOE/ASHRAE and NECB Climate Zones 5 through 7 and parts of Zone 4); To advance MURB design practices, construction practices, and material use based on best knowledge, in order to ensure the durable performance of wood-frame building enclosures that are insulated to higher levels than traditional wood-frame construction. The major requirements for thermal performance of building enclosures are summarized (up to February 2013), including those for the following codes and standards: 2011 National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings (2011 NECB); 2013 interim update of the 2010 National Building Code of Canada (2010 NBC, Section 9.36–Energy Efficiency); 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (2012 IECC); American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1– Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (2004, 2007, and 2010 versions). In addition to meeting the requirements of the various building codes and standards, a building may need to incorporate construction practices that reflect local preferences in material use, design and construction. Regional climate differences will also affect design solutions. This guide primarily addresses above-grade walls, below-grade walls and roofs of platform wood-frame construction. It also includes information regarding thermal performance of cross-laminated timber (CLT) assemblies as well as the use of non-bearing wood-frame exterior walls (infill walls) in wood post-and-beam and concrete structures. Examples of thermal resistance calculations, building assemblies, critical interface detailing, and appropriate material selection are provided to help guide designers and builders meet the requirements of the various energy-efficiency codes and standards, achieve above-code performance, and ensure long-term durability. This guide builds on the fundamentals of building science and on information contained within the Building Enclosure Design Guide: Wood-Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings, published by the Homeowner Protection Office, Branch of BC Housing. This guide is based on the best current knowledge and future updates are anticipated. The guide is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice that considers specific building parameters.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for On-site Moisture Management of Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1968
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Management
Construction
Risk Mitigation
Prefabrication
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Overall moisture management during construction has become increasingly important due to the increase in building height and area, which potentially prolongs the exposure to inclement weather, and the overall increase in speed of construction, which may not allow adequate time for drying to occur. This report provides guidelines and relevant information about on-site moisture management practices that can be adapted to suit a range of wood construction projects...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide for Wind-Vibration Design of Wood-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue379
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Dynamic Properties
Ambient Vibration Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
It is not surprising to see a rapid growth in the demand for mid- to high-rise buildings. Traditionally, these types of buildings have been dominated by steel and concrete. This trend creates a great opportunity for wood to expand its traditional single and low-rise multi-family building market to the growing mid- to high-rise building market. The significance and importance of wood construction to environmental conservation and the Canadian economy has been recognized by governments, the building industry, architects, design engineers, builders and clients. It is expected that more and more tall wood frame buildings of 6- to 8-storeys (or taller) will be constructed in Canada. Before we can push for use of wood in such applications, however, several barriers to wood success in its traditional and potential market places have to be removed. Lack of knowledge of the dynamic properties of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings and their responses to wind, and absence of current guidelines for wind vibration design of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings are examples of such barriers.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Guide to Calculating Airborne Sound Transmission in Tuildings: Fifth Edition, December 2019

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2617
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Hoeller, Christoph
Quirt, David
Mahn, Jeffrey
Müller-Trapet, Markus
Organization
National Research Council of Canada. Construction
Publisher
National Research Council of Canada. Construction
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Apparent Sound Transmission Class
Sound Insulation
Sound Transmission
Concrete
Building Code
Impact Sound
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In recent years, the science and engineering for controlling sound transmission in buildings have shifted from a focus on individual assemblies such as walls or floors, to a focus on performance of the complete system. Standardized procedures for calculating the overall transmission, combined with standardized measurements to characterize sub-assemblies, provide much better prediction of sound transmission between adjacent indoor spaces. The International Standards Organization (ISO) has published a calculation method, ISO 15712-1 that uses laboratory test data for sub-assemblies such as walls and floors as inputs for a detailed procedure to calculate the expected sound transmission between adjacent rooms in a building. This standard works very well for some types of construction, but to use it in a North American context one must overcome two obstacles – incompatibility with the ASTM standards used by our construction industry, and low accuracy of its predictions for lightweight wood or steel frame construction. To bypass limitations of ISO 15712-1, this Guide explains how to merge ASTM and ISO test data in the ISO calculation procedure, and provides recommendations for applying extended measurement and calculation procedures for specific common types of construction. This Guide was developed in a project established by the National Research Council of Canada to support the transition of construction industry practice to using apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) for sound control objectives in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). However, the potential range of application goes beyond the minimum requirements of the NBCC – the Guide also facilitates design to provide enhanced sound insulation, and should be generally applicable to construction in both Canada and the USA. This publication contains a limited set of examples for several types of construction, to provide an introduction and overview of the ASTC calculation procedure. Additional examples and measurement data can be found in the companion documents to this Guide, namely NRC Research Reports RR-333 to RR-337. Furthermore, the calculation procedure outlined and illustrated in this Guide is also used by the software web application soundPATHS, which is available for free on the website of the National Research Council of Canada (see the references in Section 7 of this Guide for access details).
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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30 records – page 1 of 3.