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20 records – page 1 of 2.

Accommodating Shrinkage in Multi-Story Wood-Frame Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue712
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
McLain, Richard
Steimle, Doug
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Shrinkage
Mid-Rise
Multi-Story
Moisture Content
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In wood-frame buildings of three or more stories, cumulative shrinkage can be significant and have an impact on the function and performance of finishes, openings, mechanical/electrical/plumbing (MEP) systems, and structural connections. However, as more designers look to wood-frame construction to improve the cost and sustainability of their mid-rise projects, many have learned that accommodating wood shrinkage is actually very straightforward. This publication will describe procedures for estimating wood shrinkage and provide detailing options that minimize its effects on building performance.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2639
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Floors
Walls

Acoustics and Mass Timber: Room-to-Room Noise Control

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2925
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Application
Floors
Author
McLain, Richard
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Report
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Mass
Noise Barriers
Decouplers
Floor Topping
Acoustic Mat
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The growing availability and code acceptance of mass timber—i.e., large solid wood panel products such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and nail-laminated timber (NLT)—for floor, wall and roof construction has given designers a low-carbon alternative to steel, concrete, and masonry for many applications. However, the use of mass timber in multi-family and commercial buildings presents unique acoustic challenges. While laboratory measurements of the impact and airborne sound isolation of traditional building assemblies such as light wood-frame, steel and concrete are widely available, fewer resources exist that quantify the acoustic performance of mass timber assemblies. Additionally, one of the most desired aspects of mass timber construction is the ability to leave a building’s structure exposed as finish, which createsthe need for asymmetric assemblies. With careful design and detailing, mass timber buildings can meet the acoustic performance expectations of most building types.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Analysis Guidance for Cross-Laminated Timber Construction Exposed to Airblast Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2926
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
General Information
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Weaver, Mark
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Explosions
Blast Load
Protective Design
Blast-resistance
Response Limits
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Buildings constructed for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) often have to meet blast-resistance requirements to mitigate the potential effects of terrorism. Terrorism is also a growing threat for civilian buildings (e.g., iconic structures, corporate headquarters, etc.), necessitating more building designers to incorporate blast resistance into their designs. The emergence of mass timber construction, and cross-laminated timber (CLT) in particular, offers a sustainable building material alternative that can also meet blast-resistance criteria in many circumstances.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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An Approach to CLT Diaphragm Modeling for Seismic Design with Application to a U.S. High-Rise Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1710
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Author
Breneman, Scott
McDonnell, Eric
Zimmerman, Reid
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
US
Model
Diaphragm
High-Rise
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A candidate cross-laminated timber (CLT) diaphragm analysis model approach is presented and evaluated as an engineering design tool motivated by the needs of seismic design in the United States. the modeling approach consists of explicitly modeling CLT panels as discrete orthotropic shell elements with connections between panels and connections from panels to structural framing modeled as two-point springs. The modeling approach has been compared to a developed CLT diapragm design example based on the US standards showing the ability to obtain matching deflection results. The sensitivity of the deflection calculations considering CLT panel-to-panel connection gap closure is investigated using a simple diaphragm example. the proposed modeling approach is also applied to the candidate floor diaphragm design for the Framework project, a winner of the US Tall Wood Building Prize Competition, currently under design. Observations from this effort are that the proposed method, while a more refined model than typically used during building design, shows promise to meet the needs of innovative CLT seismic designs where appropriate simpler diapragm models are not available.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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CLT Diaphragm Design for Wind and Seismic Resistance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2967
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Breneman, Scott
McDonnell, Eric
Tremayne, Donovan
Houston, Jonas
Gu, Mengzhe
Zimmerman, Reid
Montgomery, Graham
Organization
WoodWorks
Holmes
KPFF Consulting Engineers
Timberlab
Publisher
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Diaphragm
Shear Capacity
Diaphragm Flexibility
Panel-to-Panel Connections
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) has become increasingly prominent in building construction and can be seen in buildings throughout the world. Specifically, the use of CLT floor and roof panels as a primary gravity force-resisting component has become relatively commonplace. Now, with availability of the 2021 Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic (SDPWS 2021) from the American Wood Council (AWC), U.S. designers have a standardized path to utilize CLT floor and roof panels as a structural diaphragm. Prior to publication of this document, projects typically had to receive approval to use CLT as a structural diaphragm on a case-by-case basis from the local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). This paper highlights important provisions of SDPWS 2021 for CLT diaphragm design and recommendations developed by the authors in the upcoming CLT Diaphragm Design Guide, based on SDPWS 2021.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Concealed Spaces in Mass Timber and Heavy Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2920
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Decking
Walls
Roofs
Author
McLain, Richard
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Decking
Walls
Roofs
Topic
Fire
Keywords
IBC
Concealed Spaces
Dropped Ceiling
Sprinklers
Noncombustible Insulation
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Concealed spaces, such as those created by a dropped ceiling in a floor/ceiling assembly or by a stud wall assembly, have unique requirements in the International Building Code (IBC) to address the potential of fire spread in nonvisible areas of a building. Section 718 of the 2018 IBC includes prescriptive requirements for protection and/or compartmentalization of concealed spaces through the use of draft stopping, fire blocking, sprinklers and other means.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Demonstrating Fire-Resistance Ratings for Mass Timber Elements in Tall Wood Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2919
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Floors
Author
McLain, Richard
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Report
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
IBC
Minimum Dimensions
Fire Resistance Rating
Noncombustible Protection
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Changes to the 2021 International Building Code (IBC) have created opportunities for wood buildings that are much larger and taller than prescriptively allowed in past versions of the code. Occupant safety, and the need to ensure fire performance in particular, was a fundamental consideration as the changes were developed and approved. The result is three new construction types—Type IV-A, IV-B and IV-C—which are based on the previous Heavy Timber construction type (renamed Type IV-HT), but with additional fire protection requirements. One of the main ways to demonstrate that a building will meet the required level of passive fire protection, regardless of structural materials, is through hourly fire-resistance ratings (FRRs) of its elements and assemblies. The IBC defines an FRR as the period of time a building element, component or assembly maintains the ability to confine a fire, continues to perform a given structural function, or both, as determined by the tests, or the methods based on tests, prescribed in Section 703. FRRs for the new construction types are similar to those required for Type I construction, which is primarily steel and concrete. They are found in IBC Table 601, which includes FRR requirements for all construction types and building elements; however, other code sections should be checked for overriding provisions (e.g., occupancy separation, shaft enclosures, etc.) that may alter the requirement.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Design Example of a Cantilever Wood Diaphragm

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3033
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Malone, R. Terry
Breneman, Scott
Organization
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Document
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Wall
Diaphragm
Lateral Force Resisting System
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Complex building shapes and footprints are driving design procedures and code requirements to evolve for all lateral force-resisting systems and materials. As buildings get taller and more complex, there is a greater need to understand the relative stiffness of diaphragms and shear walls, and multi-story shear wall effects. Architecturally demanding exterior wall lines in modern structures do not always provide opportunities to use traditional design approaches. The goal of this paper is to provide an example of how to analyze a single-story structure with a double cantilever diaphragm and help engineers better understand the code and standards issues associated with these types of structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Differential Material Movement in Tall Mass Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2982
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Moisture
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Racine, Josephine
Lumpkin, Bryce
McLain, Richard
Organization
Fast + Epp
WoodWorks
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Column Movement
Vertical Movement
Creep
Settlement
Shrinkage
Crushing Perpendicular to Grain
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As the height of mass timber buildings continues to grow, a new set of design and detailing challenges arises, creating the need for new engineering solutions to achieve optimal building construction and performance. One necessary detailing consideration is vertical movement, which includes column shrinkage, joint settlement, and creep. The main concerns are the impact of deformations on vertical mechanical systems, exterior enclosures, and interior partitions, as well as differential vertical movement of timber framing systems relative to other building features such as concrete core walls and exterior façades.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.