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25 records – page 1 of 3.

An Overview on Retrofit for Improving Building Energy Efficiency

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue365
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Ranger, Lindsay
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Concrete
Energy Consumption
Envelope
Retrofit
Single Family Houses
Steel
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This literature review aims to provide a general picture of retrofit needs, markets, and commonly used strategies and measures to reduce building energy consumption, and is primarily focused on energy retrofit of the building envelope. Improving airtightness and thermal performance are the two key aspects for improving energy performance of the building envelope and subsequently reducing the energy required for space heating or cooling. This report focuses on the retrofit of single family houses and wood-frame buildings and covers potential use of wood-based systems in retrofitting the building envelope of concrete and steel buildings. Air sealing is typically the first step and also one of the most cost-effective measures to improving energy performance of the building envelope. Airtightness can be achieved through sealing gaps in the existing air barrier, such as polyethylene or drywall, depending on the air barrier approach; or often more effectively, through installing a new air barrier, such as an airtight exterior sheathing membrane or continuous exterior insulation during retrofit. Interface detailing is always important to achieve continuity and effectiveness of an air barrier. For an airtight building, mechanical ventilation is needed to ensure good indoor air quality and heat recovery ventilators are typically required for an energy efficient building. Improving thermal resistance of the building envelope is the other key strategy to improve building energy efficiency during retrofit. This can be achieved by: 1. blowing or injecting insulation into an existing wall or a roof; 2. building extra framing, for example, by creating double-stud exterior walls to accommodate more thermal insulation; or, 3. by installing continuous insulation, typically on the exterior. Adding exterior insulation is a major solution to improving thermal performance of the building envelope, particularly for large buildings. When highly insulated building envelope assemblies are built, more attention is required to ensure good moisture performance. An increased level of thermal insulation generally increases moisture risk due to increased vapour condensation potential but reduced drying ability. Adding exterior insulation can make exterior structural components warmer and consequently reduce vapour condensation risk in a heating climate. However, the vapour permeance of exterior insulation may also affect the drying ability and should be taken into account in design. Overall energy retrofit remains a tremendous potential market since the majority of existing buildings were built prior to implementation of any energy requirement and have large room available for improving energy performance. However, significant barriers exist, mostly associated with retrofit cost. Improving energy performance of the building envelope typically has a long payback time depending on the building, climate, target performance, and measures taken. Use of wood-based products during energy retrofit also needs to be further identified and developed.
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Free
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Comparison of Operational Energy Performance among Exterior Wall Systems for Mid-Rise Construction in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue355
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Morris, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Canada
Exterior Walls
Energy Consumption
Residential
National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings
Climate
Steel-Stud Framing
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The largest source of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Canada and around the world is buildings. As a consequence, building designers are encouraged to adopt designs that reduce operational energy, through both increasingly stringent energy codes and voluntary green building programs that go beyond code requirements...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Construction Moisture Management, Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2685
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Wetting
Risk Mitigation
Drying
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is an engineered mass timber product manufactured by laminating dimension lumber in layers with alternating orientation using structural adhesives. It is intended for use under dry service conditions and is commonly used to build floors, roofs, and walls. Because prolonged wetting of wood may cause staining, mould, excessive dimensional change (sometimes enough to fail connectors), and even result in decay and loss of strength, construction moisture is an important consideration when building with CLT. This document aims to provide technical information to help architects, engineers, and builders assess the potential for wetting of CLT during building construction and identify appropriate actions to mitigate the risk.
Online Access
Free
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Evolution of the Building Envelope in Modern Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1799
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Moisture
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Moisture
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Building Envelope
Tall Wood
Wood Infill Walls
Podium Structures
Articulated Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report provides an overview of major changes occurred in the recent decade to design and construction of the building envelope of wood and wood-hybrid construction. It also covers some new or unique considerations required to improve building envelope performance, due to evolutions of structural systems, architectural design, energy efficiency requirements, or use of new materials. It primarily aims to help practicioners better understand wood-based building envelope systems to improve design and construction practices. The information provided should also be useful to the wood industry to better understand the demands for wood products in the market place. Gaps in research are identified and summarized at the end of this report.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Field Hygrothermal Performance of R22+ Wood-Frame Walls in Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2775
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Keywords
Hygrothermal Performance
Exterior Wall
Mid-Rise
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A test program was conducted to generate hygrothermal performance data for light-wood-frame exterior walls meeting the R22 effective (RSI 3.85) requirement for buildings up to six storeys in the City of Vancouver. Six types of exterior wall assemblies, with 12 wall panels in total, were tested using a test hut located in the rear yard of FPInnovations’ Vancouver aboratory. This document provides a brief summary of the test and performance of these walls based on the data collected over the 19 months’ period from October 2018 to May 2020
Online Access
Free
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Field Measurement of Vertical Movement and Roof Moisture Performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1182
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Vertical Movement
Moisture Content
Temperature
Relative Humidity
Monitoring
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Two of the major topics of interest to those designing taller and larger wood buildings are the susceptibility to differential movement and the likelihood of mass timber components drying too slowly after they become wet during construction. The Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George, British Columbia provides a unique opportunity for non-destructive...
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Free
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Field Measurement of Vertical Movement and Roof Moisture Performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1638
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Karsh, Eric
Finch, Graham
Chen, Mingyuk
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Roofs
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Moisture Content
Vertical Movement
Temperature
Relative Humidity
Monitoring
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3152-3160
Summary
The Wood Innovation and Design Centre (WIDC) in Prince George, British Columbia, with 6 tall storeys and a total height of 29.5 m, provided a unique opportunity for non-destructive testing and monitoring to measure the ‘As Built’ performance of a relatively tall mass timber building. The mass timber structural system consists of glulam columns and beams with cross laminated timber (CLT)...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Field Measurement of Vertical Movement and Roof Moisture Performance of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre: Instrumentation and First Year's Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue102
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Differential Movement
Long-term
Moisture
Plywood
Roofs
Shrinkage
Tall Wood
Vertical Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Two of the major topics of interest to those designing taller and larger wood buildings are the susceptibility to differential movement and the likelihood of mass timber components drying slowly after they are wetted during construction. The Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George, British Columbia provides a unique opportunity...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Gestion de l'Humidité en Construction, Bois Lamellé-Croisé

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2686
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Wetting
Risk Mitigation
Drying
Language
French
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Le bois lamellé-croisé (CLT) est un produit massif de bois d’ingénierie qui est fabriqué à partir de multiples pièces de bois de dimension assemblées en couches orthogonales avec des adhésifs structuraux. Ce produit est conçu pour des conditions de service sèches et est couramment utilisé pour construire des planchers, des toits et des murs. Comme l’humidification prolongée du bois peut causer des taches, de la moisissure, des variations dimensionnelles excessives (parfois suffisantes pour provoquer la défaillance des attaches), et même la pourriture et la perte de résistance, l’humidité est un facteur important dans la construction avec le CLT. Le présent document a pour but de fournir de l’information technique pouvant aider les architectes, les ingénieurs et les constructeurs à évaluer les risques d’humidification du CLT pendant la construction de bâtiments et à prendre les mesures appropriées pour atténuer ces risques.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Guide for On-site Moisture Management of Wood Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1968
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Management
Construction
Risk Mitigation
Prefabrication
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Overall moisture management during construction has become increasingly important due to the increase in building height and area, which potentially prolongs the exposure to inclement weather, and the overall increase in speed of construction, which may not allow adequate time for drying to occur. This report provides guidelines and relevant information about on-site moisture management practices that can be adapted to suit a range of wood construction projects...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.