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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Advanced Topics in Seismic Analysis and Design of Mid-Rise Wood-Frame Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1773
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Ni, Chun
Popovski, Marjan
Wang, Jasmine
Karacabeyli, Erol
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Dynamic Analysis
Deflection
Diaphragm
National Building Code of Canada
Capacity-Based Design
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5343-5351
Summary
The following topics in the field of seismic analysis and design of mid-rise (5- and 6-storey) wood-frame buildings are included in this paper: Determination of the building period, linear dynamic analysis of wood-frame structures, deflections of stacked multi-storey shearwalls, diaphragm classification, capacity-based design for woodframe...
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CLT Panels Subjected to Combined Out-of-Plane Bending and Compressive Axial Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1729
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Jasmine
Mohammad, Mohammad
Di Lenardo, Bruno
Sultan, Mohamed
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Out Of Plane
Bending
Compressive Axial Loads
Canada
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4738-4745
Summary
With the introduction of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) into North America and gaining popularity it is of interest to the design and code development community to have codified provisions to facilitate the design of CLT structures. This paper addresses the design aspect of CLT panels subjected to combined bending and compressive axial...
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A Comparative Analysis of Three Methods Used for Calculating Deflections for Multi-Storey Wood Shearwalls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1719
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deformation
Drifts
Stiffness
Building Period
Base Shear
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4597-4604
Summary
With the introduction of 5 and 6-storey wood structures into the National Building Code of Canada 2015, it is important that guidance be provided to engineers to ensure that a reasonable design approach can be sought in the design of taller wood structures. The purpose of this technical paper is to compare various methods for calculating building...
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Design Example: Design of Stacked Multi-Storey Wood Shear Walls Using a Mechanics Based Approach

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue739
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Newfield, Grant
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Codes
National Building Code of Canada
Lateral Seismic Loads
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Figure 1 shows a floor plan and elevation along with the preliminary shear wall locations for a sixstorey wood-frame building. It is assumed some preliminary calculations have been provided to determine the approximate length of wall required to resist the lateral seismic loads. If the preliminary design could not meet the drift limit requirement using the base shear obtained based on the actual period, the shear walls should be re-designed until the drift limit requirement is satisfied.
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Design Example: Wood Diaphragm Using Envelope Method

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2613
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Neylon, B.
Wang, Jasmine
Ni, Chun
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Diaphragm
Low-Rise
Commercial
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This building is a typical one-storey commercial building located in Vancouver, BC. The plan dimensions are 30.5 m x 12.2 m (100’ x 40’), with a building height of 5 m. The walls are wood-based shear walls, with a wood diaphragm roof and a steel moment frame at the storefront. The roof plan is shown in Figure 1. The site is Seismic Class ‘C’. Wind, snow and seismic figures specific to the project location are taken from the current version of the British Columbia Building Code (2012). Roof dead load is assumed to be 1.0 kPa and the wall weight is 0.5 kPa. The weight of non-structural items including mechanical equipment and the storefront façade has not been included in this example for simplicity.
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Durability of Mass Timber Structures: a Review of the Biological Risks

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1838
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Environmental Impact
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Linear Dynamic Analysis for Wood-Based Shear Walls and Podium Structures: Part 1: Developing Input Parameters for Linear Dynamic Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue740
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ni, Chun
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deflection
Linear Dynamic Analysis
National Building Code of Canada
Stiffness
Floor Drifts
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Utilizing Linear Dynamic Analysis (LDA) for designing steel and concrete structures has been common practice over the last 25 years. Once preliminary member sizes have been determined for either steel or concrete, building a model for LDA is generally easy as the member sizes and appropriate stiffness can be easily input into any analysis program. However, performing an LDA for a conventional wood-frame structure has been, until recently, essentially non-existent in practice. The biggest challenge is that the stiffness properties required to perform an LDA for a wood-based system are not as easily determined as they are for concrete or steel structures. This is mostly due to the complexities associated with determining the initial parameters required to perform the analysis. With the height limit for combustible construction limited to four stories under the National Building Code of Canada, it was uncommon for designers to perform detailed analysis to determine the stiffness of shear walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts. It was only in rare situations where one may have opted to check building deflections. With the recent change in allowable building heights for combustible buildings from four to six storeys under an amendment to the 2006 BC Building Code, it has become even more important that designers consider more sophisticated methods for the analysis and design of wood-based shear walls. As height limits increase, engineers should also be more concerned with the assumptions made in determining the relative stiffness of walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts to ensure that a building is properly detailed to meet the minimum Code objectives. Although the use of LDA has not been common practice, the more rigorous analysis, as demonstrated in the APEGBC bulletin on 5- and 6-storey wood-frame residential building projects (APEGBC 2011), could be considered the next step which allows one to perform an LDA. This fact sheet provides a method to assist designers who may want to consider an LDA for analyzing wood-frame structures. It is important to note that while LDA may provide useful information as well as streamline the design of wood-frame structures, it most often will not be necessary.
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A Mechanics Based Approach for Determining Deflections of Stacked Multi-Storey Wood Based Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue738
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Newfield, Grant
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Deflection
Flexural Deformations
Shear
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The 2009 edition of CSA Standard O86, Engineering Design in Wood (CSA 2009), provides an equation for determining the deflection of shear walls. It is important to note that this equation only works for a single-storey shear wall with load applied at the top of the wall. While the equation captures the shear and flexural deformations of the shear wall, it does not account for moment at the top of the wall and the cumulative effect due to rotation at the bottom of the wall, which would be expected in a multi-storey structure. In this fact sheet, a mechanics-based method for calculating deflection of a multi-storey wood-based shear wall is presented.
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Mid-Rise Wood: Characterization of Hygrothermal Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue49
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Mukhopadhyaya, Phalguni
Bundalo-Perc, Sladana
van Reenen, David
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Envelope
Exterior Walls
Hygrothermal
Mid-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
To evaluate the building envelope performance of the generic exterior wall assemblies developed for use in mid-rise wood buildings, hygrothermal properties of materials used in the assemblies are needed as input data for hygrothermal modelling. Hygrothermal properties were developed for fire retardant treated plywood, regular gypsum sheathing, spray polyurethane foam and cross-laminated timber. This report documents results of the hygrothermal property determinations. The objective of this part of the research project was to generate a set of reliable and representative data on hygrothermal properties of a number of selected building materials as mentioned below. 1. D-Blaze Treated Plywood 2. Dricon Treated Plywood 3. Gypsum Sheathing 4. Closed Cell Spray Polyurethane Foam Insulation (Purple in Colour)
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Vertical Movement in Wood Platform Frame Structures: Design and Detailing Solutions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue736
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Doudak, Ghasan
Lepper, Peggy
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Differential Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Most buildings are designed to accommodate a certain range of movement. In design, it is important for designers to identify locations where potential differential movement could affect structural integrity and serviceability, predict the amount of differential movement and develop proper detailing to accommodate it. To allow non-structural materials to be appropriately constructed, estimate of anticipated differential movement should be provided in the design drawings. Simply specifying wood materials with lower MC at time of delivery does not guarantee that the wood will not get wet on construction sites and will deliver lower shrinkage amounts as anticipated. It is therefore important to ensure that wood does not experience unexpected wetting during storage, transportation and construction. Good construction sequencing also plays an important role in reducing wetting, the consequent wood shrinkage and other moisture-related issues. Existing documents such as the APEGBC Technical and Practice Bulletin on 5- and 6-Storey Wood Frame Residential Building Projects, the Best Practice Guide published by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), the Building Enclosure Design Guide – Wood Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings published by the BC Housing- Homeowner Protection Office (HPO) provide general design guidance on how to reduce and accommodate differential movement in platform frame construction.
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11 records – page 1 of 2.