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Bending Properties of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) with a 45° Alternating Layer Configuration

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue319
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Buck, Dietrich
Wang, Alice
Hagman, Olle
Gustafsson, Anders
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Test
Norway Spruce
Four Point Bending Test
Alternating Layer
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Bending tests were conducted with cross laminated timber (CLT) panels made using an alternating layer arrangement. Boards of Norway spruce were used to manufacture five-layer panels on an industrial CLT production line. In total, 20 samples were tested, consisting of two CLT configurations with 10 samples of each type: transverse layers at 45° and the conventional 90° arrangement. Sample dimensions were 95 mm × 590 mm × 2000 mm. The CLT panels were tested by four point bending in the main load-carrying direction in a flatwise panel layup. The results indicated that bending strength increased by 35% for elements assembled with 45° layers in comparison with 90° layers. Improved mechanical load bearing panel properties could lead to a larger span length with less material.
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Comparison of Different Assembling Techniques Regarding Cost, Durability, and Ecology: A Survey of Multi-Layer Wooden Panel Assembly Load-Bearing Construction Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue62
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Buck, Dietrich
Wang, Alice
Hagman, Olle
Gustafsson, Anders
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Durability
Assembling Techniques
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Wood is a pure, sustainable, renewable material. The increasing use of wood for construction can improve its sustainability. There are various techniques to assemble multi-layer wooden panels into prefabricated, load-bearing construction elements. However, comparative market and economy studies are still scarce. In this study, the following assembling techniques were compared: laminating, nailing, stapling, screwing, stress laminating, doweling, dovetailing, and wood welding. The production costs, durability, and ecological considerations were presented. This study was based on reviews of published works and information gathered from 27 leading wood product manufacturing companies in six European countries. The study shows that the various techniques of assembling multi-layer wooden construction panel elements are very different. Cross laminated timber (CLT) exhibited the best results in terms of cost and durability. With regard to ecological concerns, dovetailing is the best. Taking into account both durability and ecological considerations, wooden screw-doweling is the best. These alternatives give manufacturers some freedom of choice regarding the visibility of surfaces and the efficient use of lower-quality timber. CLT is the most cost-effective, is not patented, and is a well-established option on the market today.
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Investigation of Gluelines Block Shear Strength of Norway Spruce Glulam Joints in a Cold Climate

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue526
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Wang, Alice
Björnberg, Jonatan
Hagman, Olle
Ahmed, Sheikh
Wan, Hui
Niemz, Peter
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Melamine Urea Formaldehyde
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Adhesives
Block Shear Strength
Temperature
Climate
Melamine Formaldehyde
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) has been developed to a worldwide well-known and versatile useable building material. Currently increasing rates in production volume and distribution can be observed. In fact CLT, thanks to its laminar structure making it well suited for use in construction, provides new horizons in timber engineering, in areas which had until now been the realm of mineral building materials like concrete and masonry. After a short introduction, this paper aims to demonstrate current production processes used for rigid CLT. In section 2 the process steps are described and essential requirements, as well as pros and cons of various production techniques, are discussed. Latest results of R & D and of development and innovation in production technology are presented. In section 3 test and monitoring procedures in the area of the internal quality assurance, known as factory production control (FPC), are presented. Diverse regulations, in the form of technical approvals for CLT as well as in the CLT product standard prEN 16351 [1], are discussed. Additionally, some technological aspects of the product, CLT, together with a comparison of geometrical and production relevant parameters of current technical approvals in Europe are provided in section 4. In the final and main part of the paper, production and technology is presented in a condensed way. The outlook for current and future developments, as well as the ongoing establishment of the solid construction technique with CLT, is given. The product, CLT, comprises an enormous potential for timber engineering as well as for society as a whole. Standardisation and further innovation in production, prefabrication, joining technique, building physics and building construction make it possible for timber engineering to achieve worldwide success.
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Shear Capacity of Stud-Groove Connector in Glulam-Concrete Composite Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2217
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite

Study on Mechanical Property of Bolt Connector for Timber-Concrete Composite Structure with Interlamination Slips

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1768
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Author
He, Guojing
Xie, Lan
Wang, Alice
Yi, Jin
Li, Yuanyuan
Xiang, Lvlin
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Analysis
China
Push-Out Tests
Bolts
Failure Mode
Shear Strength
Shear Capacity
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5250-5256
Summary
A timber-concrete composite structure (TCC) is a high strength and low energy-consumption structure, which is developed widely in Europe and America. The objective of this paper is to predict structural response with finite element (FE) analysis and provide shear property of TCC structures with Chinese materials. In this paper, some...
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