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Identifying the Economic Barriers to CLT Cost Estimation Among Building Construction Professionals

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2345
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Stutesman, Jonathan H.
Organization
Virginia Tech
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Keywords
Cost Estimation
Survey
Commercial
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timbers (CLTs) are strong and lightweight structural building materials. CLTs are made from renewable wood resources and have significant economic potential as a new value-added product for the United States. However, market penetration has been obstructed by product affordability and lack of availability for use. Previous studies and projects have surveyed opinions of designers and contractors about the adoption of CLTs. No previous study was found that surveyed cost estimators, who serve the essential function of creating economic comparisons of alternative materials in commercial construction. CLTs are not included in these current cost estimation tools and software packages which may be limiting the potential use of CLT in construction. The purpose of this study was to discover if cost estimation is being used to make structural decisions potentially affecting the marketability of CLT use in construction and building design because of the ability to estimate CLTs adequately. Through the use of a survey, the re-designing of a building, and discussions with subject matter experts, this study examined the knowledge level of cross-laminated timbers of under-surveyed building construction professions and the relationship between cost estimation and structural material choices. Their responses are demonstrating the need for better cost estimation tools for cross-laminated timbers such as inclusion in the Construction Specifications Institute's classification systems in order for CLTs to become a more competitive product. The study concluded that cost estimation is important for CLT market development, because it is being used extensively in the construction industry.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mechanical Performance of Yellow-Poplar Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue199
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Mohamadzadeh, Milad
Hindman, Daniel
Organization
Virginia Tech University
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Hardwood
Poplar
Shear Strength
Four Point Bending Test
Stiffness
Strength
Five Point Bending Test
Delamination
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of this paper was to examine whether CLT made from fast growing hardwood species can provide sufficient mechanical performance need to be used in structural engineering applications. Yellow-poplar CLT was tested experimentally for stiffness and strength in five-point bending and four-point bending tests, respectively as well as resistance to shear by compression lading and resistance to delamination and the results were compared with American National Standard Institute/APA-The Engineered Wood Association (ANSI/APA) PRG 320-Standard for Performance Rated Cross-Laminated Timber and previous research. Bending stiffness, bending strength and resistance to delamination exceeded the required value in the standard, while wood failure in resistance to shear by compression loading was less than the required value. Shear strength of the yellow-poplar CLT was also greater than CLT produced from softwood species tested in previous research. Acceptable mechanical performance of yellow-poplar CLT confirmed in this research, could be a start point of using hardwood species in CLT structural design.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail