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Acoustic Lab Testing of CLT and MPP Wall and Floor Assemblies for Multi-Family Residential Application

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2831
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Van Den Wymelenberg, Kevin
Northcutt, Dale
Fretz, Mark
Stenson, Jason
Zagorec-Marks, Ethan
Organization
University of Oregon
Publisher
University of Oregon
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Acoustics
Laboratory Tests
Sound Transmission Class
Impact Isolation Class
Insulation
Dry Assembly
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber products are growing in popularity, particularly in multifamily residential dwellings, for which they are structurally well-suited. However, acoustic performance of these products has not been robustly tested, which can be a hindrance to building projects due to lack of code compliance or building performance with poor acoustics. The latter is particularly important since the sound transmission class (STC) rating—a single number used to characterize decibel attenuation—does not characterize an assembly in terms of which frequencies it blocks well or transmits. Wood does a good job of attenuating mid- to high-range frequencies, but not necessarily low ones, such as from a sub-woofer, so testing of assemblies is critical because it elicits their performance in terms of the entire range of frequencies, in addition to defining a single STC rating. This allows for adjustments to be made that balance the acoustic performance of the assembly – such as adding isolation through solutions like air space or concrete topping – with construction cost, sequencing and aesthetics. The other standard acoustic rating, impact insulation class (IIC), accounts for foot-fall and other impact noises and is another critical test for determining code compliance of floor assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Developing an Application for Mass Plywood Panels in Seismic and Energy Wall Retrofit

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2568
Topic
Energy Performance
Seismic
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Building Envelope
Organization
University of Oregon
Oregon State University
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Building Envelope
Topic
Energy Performance
Seismic
Keywords
Retrofit
Assembly
Prefabrication
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mark Fretz at the University of Oregon
Summary
University of Oregon and Oregon State University are collaborating through TallWood Design Institute (TDI) to upgrade aging, energy inefficient and seismically unprepared multifamily housing by developing a mass plywood (MPP) retrofit panel assembly that employs digital workflows and small diameter logs (down to 5") to create an economically viable energy/seismic retrofit model for the West Coast and beyond. The project has broad potential to support forested federal land management agencies and private forestry by proving a new market for small diameter logs.
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Facilitation of Acoustics Testing for Sustainable Mass Timber Technologies, Leading to Publication of Open Source Acoustics Data for Standard Acoustics Scenarios

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2629
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Organization
University of Oregon
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Acoustics Testing Facility
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg at the University of Oregon
Summary
Our aim is to support the acceptance and increase market share of sustainable mass timber construction technologies such as Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), Mass Plywood Panel (MPP), Glue Laminated Timber (GLT), and Nail Laminated Timber (NLT), by lowering or eliminating barriers due to lack of acoustics data for mass timber construction assemblies. Currently, sustainable mass timber projects carry the cost of required acoustics testing, impairing their economic feasibility. With our new acoustics testing facility, testing supported by this grant will produce common acoustics data on the assemblies most in market demand. These data will be hosted in an online open-access database, supporting rapid growth in this industry. Increasingly specialized testing scenarios will be more easily accommodated, as this facility is located closer to USFS source materials and production facilities than currently operating facilities and is designed specifically for the specialized requirements of testing mass timber assemblies. Since sustainable mass timber technologies allow increased utilization of lower quality timber, and timber with insect damage, increasing the market share of mass timber will increase utilization of USFS timber, specifically that which might otherwise remain on-site unused. With removal of this type of timber, fire load will be lessened as well. Initial testing supported by this grant will include mass timber assemblies constructed with lower quality and smaller dimension timber.
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Impact of Species, Coatings, and RH on Microbial Community Structures within Mass Timber Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2781
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Walls
Ceilings
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
University of Oregon
Country of Publication
United States
Application
Walls
Ceilings
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Mass Timber
Coatings
Microflora
Humidity
Metagenomic Analysis
Antimicrobial
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, University of Oregon College of Design
Summary
One of the advantages of mass timber buildings is the inherent biophilic nature of expressed wood structure. Interior exposed panels not only have a positive emotional impact on building occupants, but also have unseen physiological impacts on their health. This may be driven, in part, by the influence of mass timber to improve a building’s microbiome and increase moisture content of the air. Wood is a porous, natural material that can foster microbes on its surfaces. Many of these are structurally non-destructive and potentially beneficial to occupants which together shape the building’s microbiome to have a non-visual impact on the wellness of occupants. However, building surfaces are potentially also repositories for human-associated microbes, some of which could cause illness. Furthermore, wood appears to buffer indoor humidity, a result that has been shown to support human immune system health. The properties of interior surfaces and their impact on indoor air are important factors to consider affecting the longevity of hazardous bacteria, fungi and viruses in buildings and overall human immune system health. These properties are particularly relevant in light of the recent novel coronavirus outbreak. The use of natural materials, such as wood, might be an important strategy to reduce the spread of disease indoor by fostering beneficial microbes while also inactivating pathogens (through selective antimicrobial qualities) and support of human mental health (biophellia) and immune systems (humidity buffering). Variation in wood chemistry and the addition of moisture-excluding coatings undoubtedly alter the surface environment of wood for microorganisms. Wood has also been shown to have a greater antimicrobial effect on common human-derived enteric bacteria than plastic or glass surfaces, indicating its potential to reduce the transmission and spread of pathogens on surfaces in the built environment versus synthetic materials. TallWood Design Institute and Sloan Foundation-funded UO research currently in preparation for publication, points to surface microbial community differences by material type with wood showing distinction from painted drywall, concrete and earthen plaster. That said, it is important that any positive impact on building microbiomes due to wood either be improved or at least not impaired by the addition of sealants and other protective coatings used on mass timber panels. This research will investigate the impacts of mass timber coatings and humidity on the composition of mass timber surface microflora by performing metagenomic analysis on mass timber surfaces subjected to two different humidity regimes. This will allow the study of microbes that would otherwise not be identified, providing better understanding of the composition of whole microbial communities which can be used to infer functional traits. In addition, this work will investigate the antimicrobial potential of a common commercially available sealant and alternative bio-based coatings being adapted for mass timber panels. Mock microbial communities placed on the wood surfaces will be used to study the impacts of mass timber coatings on the survivability and transmissibility of viruses and bacteria of interest.
Resource Link
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Mass Timber, Small Format: Creative Applications of Fabrication Off-cuts

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2798
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
University of Oregon
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Fabrication
Off-cuts
Cutouts
Furniture
Joinery
Open Source
Digital Design
Digital Fabrication
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Linda Zimmer and Cory Olsen at the University of Oregon
Summary
During the testing and fabrication of mass timber projects a natural byproduct inevitably occurs in the form of offcuts and cutouts. In the case of new mass timber structures, the engineered wood materials are typically fabricated and prepared off site, allowing for the majority of the leftover materials to be made into useful products at the same facility already ideally set up for further digital fabrication. While the thickness of many of the spare panelized elements under investigation/production at TDI might seem excessive for smaller scale elements, the digital design and production techniques already being used allow for a fine degree of precision commensurate with furniture joinery. We propose to experiment with designing and fabricating furniture scale components and furniture prototypes as a way to reclaim these otherwise unused timber products. This project captures off cuts and remaindered materials from structural testing at TDI in both CLT and MPP panels. Our focus is the design and fabrication of freestanding furnishings (ex: stools, benches, tables, chairs) that will exploit the technologies available at the Emmerson Lab. We come at this with two perspectives: in the first, products could be made directly from the materials available; in the second, the output will act as a formwork or “jig” to facilitate construction of an entirely new prototype that could expand into additional material languages. In either case it is important to us to share digital files of prototypes as “open source” designs so that production facilities and design professionals can work together to reduce waste and/or use our designs as a springboard to customize their own pieces. In this way we address the stated program goals to expand and develop new products and building components and to foster markets for these. Our iterative approach to digital design and digital hybrids utilizes CNC/robotic fabrication and assembly and we will be testing our ideas in a design-build format.
Resource Link
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Overcoming Market Barriers to Increase Use of Structural Mass Timber in Healthcare Environment

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2567
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Organization
University of Oregon
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Healthcare
Hygienic Performance
Moisture Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg at the University of Oregon
Summary
The goal of this project is to accelerate the application of structural mass timber, such as cross-laminated timber (CLT), in outpatient healthcare construction. In particular, this project will address concerns related to hygienic and moisture performance of CLT, as well as exploring other challenges faced in mass timber construction. The project will engage with industry partners representing architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC), healthcare professionals, and policy-makers to advance the state of knowledge and market penetration of CLT in healthcare. Healthcare construction is a large and growing sector; pioneering the use of CLT in this market would significantly increase utilization of small-diameter and lower-quality timber. Ultimately, successful implementation of this project would help achieve USFS regional priorities of supporting ecosystem restoration and wildland fire management, as well as Oregon’s State Forest Action Plan goals of protecting communities at risk of wildfire, maintaining the forestland base, and preserving diversity of upland habitats.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.