Skip header and navigation

18 records – page 1 of 2.

Braced Frame System for Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2527
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Sustainability
Post-Tensioned
Connections
Braced Frame Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced sustainable lateral load resisting systems that combine ductile and recyclable materials offer a viable solution to resist seismic load effects in environmentally responsible ways. This paper presents the seismic response of a post-tensioned timber-steel hybrid braced frame. This hybrid system combines glulam frame with steel braces to improve lateral stiffness while providing self-centreing capability under seismic loads. The proposed system is first presented. A detailed numerical model of the proposed system is then developed with emphasis on the connections and inelastic response of bracing members. Various types of braced frames including diagonal, cross and chevron configurations are numerically examined to assess the viability of the proposed concept and to confirm the efficiency of the system. A summary of initial findings is presented to demonstrate usefulness of the hybrid system. The results demonstrate that the proposed system increases overall lateral stiffness and ductility while still being able to achieve self-centring. Some additional information on connection details are provided for implementation in practical structures. The braced-frame solution is expected to widen options for lateral load resisting systems for mid-to-high-rise buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Composite CLT-Glulam Double-T Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2645
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
Fast + Epp
University of Northern British Columbia
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Vibration
Stiffness Properties
Strength
Screw
Vibration Test
Monotonic Loading Tests
GCWood
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
To support the associated Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary School and Bayview Elementary School projects in pushing the boundaries forward for long-span floor and roof construction, this testing project aims to compare different connection approaches for composite connections between glulam and cross-laminated timber (CLT) – for vibration, stiffness, and strength. Working with the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), Fast + Epp aimed to complete a series of vibration and monotonic load tests on 30’ long full-scale double-T ribbed panels. The tests consisted of screws in withdrawal, screws in shear, and nominal screws clamping with glue. Both the strength and stiffness are of interest, including slip stiffness of each connection type. This physical testing was completed in January and February 2020, where the full composite strength of each system was reached. Initial data analysis has provided information for comparison with existing models for shear connection stiffness. Publications will follow in 2021.
Resource Link
Less detail

Contemporary and Novel Hold-Down Solutions for Mass Timber Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2941
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Loss, Cristiano
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Editor
Tullini, Nerio
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Self-Tapping Screws
Internal-Perforated Steel Plates
Hyperelastic Bearing Pads
Proprietary Connections
Research Status
Complete
Series
Buildings
Summary
‘Mass timber’ engineered wood products in general, and cross-laminated timber in particular, are gaining popularity in residential, non-residential, as well as mid- and high-rise structural applications. These applications include lateral force-resisting systems, such as shear walls. The prospect of building larger and taller timber buildings creates structural design challenges; one of them being that lateral forces from wind and earthquakes are larger and create higher demands on the ‘hold-downs’ in shear wall buildings. These demands are multiple: strength to resist loads, lateral stiffness to minimize deflections and damage, as well as deformation compatibility to accommodate the desired system rocking behaviour during an earthquake. In this paper, contemporary and novel hold-down solutions for mass timber shear walls are presented and discussed, including recent research on internal-perforated steel plates fastened with self-drilling dowels, hyperelastic rubber pads with steel rods, and high-strength hold-downs with self-tapping screws.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Development of Rotational Fixity Factors for Vibration Design of Cross-Laminated Timber Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2843
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Zhang, Sigong
Zhou, Jianhui
Niederwestberg, Jan
Chui, Ying Hei
Organization
University of Alberta
University of Northern British Columbia
Publisher
Preprints
Year of Publication
2018
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
End Support
Vibration Serviceability
Floor-Wall Connection
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As an emerging building solution, cross-laminated timber (CLT) floors have been increasingly used in mass timber construction. The current vibration design of CLT floors is conservative due to the assumption of simple support conditions in the floor-to-wall connections. It is noted that end fixity occurs as a result of clamping action at the ends, arising from the gravity load applied by the structure above the floor and by the mechanical fasteners. In this paper, the semi-rigid floor-to-wall connections are treated as elastically restrained edges against rotations to account for the effect of partial constraint. A rotational end-fixity factor was first defined to reflect the relative bending stiffness between CLT floors and elastic restraints at the edges. Then, for the design of vibration serviceability of CLT floors as per the Canadian Standard for Engineering Design in Wood (CSA O86), restraint coefficients were defined and their analytical expressions were derived for natural frequencies and the mid-span deflection under a concentrated load, respectively. In particular, a simplified formula of the restraint coefficient for the fundamental frequency was developed to assist engineers in practical design. At last, by comparing with reported experimental data, the proposed design formula showed excellent agreement with test results. In the end, the proposed end fixity factor with their corresponding restraint coefficients is recommended as an effective mechanics-based approach to account for the effect of end support conditions of CLT floors.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Developments in Tall Wood and Hybrid Buildings and Environmental Impacts

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3005
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Editor
Gupta, Rishi
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Tall Wood Buildings
Hybrid Structures
Sustainable Construction
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Wood has been gaining popularity as a building material over the last few decades. There has been significant progress in technology during this period to push the limits of wood construction. At the same time, it has become more economically competitive to build with wood beyond low-rises. As a result, there has been a noteworthy shift in public perception in terms of acceptance of wood as a material for high-rise buildings. There is a growing list of tall wood buildings that have been constructed in different continents over the last decade. With worldwide population growth and increased urbanization, the trend is expected to continue. Considerable urgency for using sustainable resources to tackle the threat of climate change has resulted in a surge in demand as well as applications in recent decades. This paper reviews the significant technical advances that have contributed to those achievements and are expected to facilitate further developments.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Diaphragmatic Behaviour of Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber Steel Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2039
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Gobbi, Filippo
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
University of Trento
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Numerical Model
In-Plane Stiffness
Aspect Ratio
Load Distribution
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The diaphragmatic behaviour of floors represents one important requirement for earthquake resistant buildings since diaphragms connect the lateral load resisting systems at each floor level and transfer the seismic forces to them as a function of their in-plane stiffness. This paper presents an innovative hybrid timber-steel solution for floor diaphragms developed by coupling cross-laminated timber panels with cold-formed custom-shaped steel beams. The floor consists of prefabricated repeatable units which are fastened on-site using pre-loaded bolts and self-tapping screws, thus ensuring a fast and efficient installation. An experimentally validated numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the; i) in-plane floor stiffness; ii) aspect ratio and shape of the building plan; and iii) relative stiffness and disposition of the shear walls, on the load distribution to the shear walls. The load transfer into walls and lateral deformation of the construction system primarily depend on the adopted layouts of shear walls, and for most cases an in-plane stiffness of floors two times larger than that of walls is recommended.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Finite element analysis of alternative load paths to prevent disproportionate collapse in platform-type CLT floor systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2901
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Huber, Johannes
Bita, Hercend
Tannert, Thomas
Berg, Sven
Organization
Luleå University of Technology
University of Northern British Columbia
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Structural Robustness
High Fidelity Model
Progressive Collapse
Structural Integrity
Component Model
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
Multi-storey buildings require mitigation of consequences of unexpected or accidental events, to prevent disproportionate collapse after an initial damage. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) in platform-type construction is increasingly used for multi-storey buildings, however, the collapse behaviour and alternative load paths (ALPs) are not fully understood. A 3D non-linear component-based finite element model was developed for a platform-type CLT floor system to study the ALPs after an internal wall loss, in a pushdown analysis. The model, which accounted for connection failure, timber crushing and large displacements, was calibrated to experimental results and then adapted for boundary conditions corresponding to typical residential and office buildings. Subsequently, five parameters (floor span, connection type, vertical location of the floor, tying level, horizontal wall stiffness) were varied, to study their effects on the ALPs in 80 models. The results showed that three ALPs occurred, of which catenary action was the most dominant. Collapse resistance was mainly affected by the floor span, followed by the axial strength, stiffness and ductility of the floor-to-floor connection, the weight of the level above and the floor panel thickness. This study provides an approach to model ALPs in a platform-type CLT floor system to design disproportionate collapse resistant multi-storey CLT buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Full-scale shear-wall testing for mass-timber buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2538
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Dissipative Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Tannert at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The project will validate an innovative hold-down system for tall mass-timber structures that will satisfy the seismic performance demands of the revised CSA-O86 design provisions for such components. Subsequent to a numerical optimization of the hold-downs, full-scale CLT shear walls equipped with the hold-downs will be coupled with different energy-dissipative shear connectors (U-shaped dissipaters and self-tapping screws) and tested under monotonic push-over and reversed-cyclic loads. The project will facilitate the development of reliable design guidance for CLT systems that constitute a promising solution for many applications including tall structures where reduced weight is advantageous for seismic design.
Less detail

High-performance Connections in Cross-laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2539
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Glued-In Rods
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Tannert at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The project will validate the viability of Glued-in Rods (GiR) as high-performance connections in CLT. Small- and full-scale tests will be conducted to evaluate the performance of GiR, considering different connection parameters. The project will facilitate the development of reliable design guidance for GiR connections in CLT systems that constitute a promising solution for many applications, including tall structures where the design is governed by wind loading.
Less detail

High-Performance Timber Frames with Smart Braces

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2819
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Braced Frames
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Asif Iqbal at the University of British Columbia
Summary
Braced frames are a solution to provide stiffness to buildings to address seismic and wind loads. There is a demand for compact arrangement and efficient lateral load resisting systems. The project examines the applicability of the braced-frame structural system, with respect to seismic forces. Design recommendations will be developed for buildings located in seismic regions such as Vancouver and Victoria. 
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.