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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Braced Frame System for Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2527
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Sustainability
Post-Tensioned
Connections
Braced Frame Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Advanced sustainable lateral load resisting systems that combine ductile and recyclable materials offer a viable solution to resist seismic load effects in environmentally responsible ways. This paper presents the seismic response of a post-tensioned timber-steel hybrid braced frame. This hybrid system combines glulam frame with steel braces to improve lateral stiffness while providing self-centreing capability under seismic loads. The proposed system is first presented. A detailed numerical model of the proposed system is then developed with emphasis on the connections and inelastic response of bracing members. Various types of braced frames including diagonal, cross and chevron configurations are numerically examined to assess the viability of the proposed concept and to confirm the efficiency of the system. A summary of initial findings is presented to demonstrate usefulness of the hybrid system. The results demonstrate that the proposed system increases overall lateral stiffness and ductility while still being able to achieve self-centring. Some additional information on connection details are provided for implementation in practical structures. The braced-frame solution is expected to widen options for lateral load resisting systems for mid-to-high-rise buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Composite CLT-Glulam Double-T Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2645
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
Fast + Epp
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Vibration
Stiffness Properties
Strength
Screw
Vibration Test
Monotonic Loading Tests
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
To support the associated Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary School and Bayview Elementary School projects in pushing the boundaries forward for long-span floor and roof construction, this testing project aims to compare different connection approaches for composite connections between glulam and cross-laminated timber (CLT) – for vibration, stiffness, and strength. Working with the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), Fast + Epp aimed to complete a series of vibration and monotonic load tests on 30’ long full-scale double-T ribbed panels. The tests consisted of screws in withdrawal, screws in shear, and nominal screws clamping with glue. Both the strength and stiffness are of interest, including slip stiffness of each connection type. This physical testing was completed in January and February 2020, where the full composite strength of each system was reached. Initial data analysis has provided information for comparison with existing models for shear connection stiffness. Publications will follow in 2021.
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Full-scale shear-wall testing for mass-timber buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2538
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Hold-Down
Dissipative Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Tannert at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The project will validate an innovative hold-down system for tall mass-timber structures that will satisfy the seismic performance demands of the revised CSA-O86 design provisions for such components. Subsequent to a numerical optimization of the hold-downs, full-scale CLT shear walls equipped with the hold-downs will be coupled with different energy-dissipative shear connectors (U-shaped dissipaters and self-tapping screws) and tested under monotonic push-over and reversed-cyclic loads. The project will facilitate the development of reliable design guidance for CLT systems that constitute a promising solution for many applications including tall structures where reduced weight is advantageous for seismic design.
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High-performance Connections in Cross-laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2539
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Glued-In Rods
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Tannert at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The project will validate the viability of Glued-in Rods (GiR) as high-performance connections in CLT. Small- and full-scale tests will be conducted to evaluate the performance of GiR, considering different connection parameters. The project will facilitate the development of reliable design guidance for GiR connections in CLT systems that constitute a promising solution for many applications, including tall structures where the design is governed by wind loading.
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Vibration and Sound Insulation Performance of Mass Timber Floors with Concrete Toppings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2548
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Acoustic Membrane
Exposed Mass Timber Elements
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The impact sound perceived in the lower volume in a building is radiated by the vibration of the ceiling transmitted from the vibration of the floor generated by an impact source in the upper volume. Thus, the dynamic behaviour of a floor is one crucial intermediate step to understand the impact sound insulation performance of such a floor. A key to reducing the impact sound is to isolate the structural floor from the subfloor. Floating floor construction is a common way of improving the impact sound insulation, which is to float a concrete topping on the mass timber floor with an elastic layer in between. There are two types of floating floor solutions, a) with a continuous elastic layer and b) with point bearing elastic mounts as shown in Figure 1. This study will investigate both solutions and will provide guidance on how to adopt both solutions for mass timber floors with an exposed ceiling. The objectives of this project are: 1. To measure the sound insulation performance of mass timber floors with full-scale concrete topping on various continuous elastic interlayer materials 2. To measure the sound insulation performance of mass timber floors with full-scale concrete topping on discrete elastic load mounts
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Wood Innovation Research Laboratory – Phase 2 (Monitoring of Passive House Certified Laboratory Building)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2319
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Guido Wimmers at University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The WIRL has a footprint of 30m x 30m on a raft slab foundation and consists of shop space equipped with a concrete strong wall and floor and a crane bay, as well as a portion of the building that will consist of a two-storey office space. The structural system will be predominantly wood with glulam post and beam with a set of trusses for the middle span. The building envelope and mechanical systems is high performance in order to achieve Passive House certification. This phase 2 is for the data acquisition and analysis from the building sensors and energy meters. A data acquisition (DAQ) system will be created to monitor the performance of the building over the next few years and store the data in an accessible, organized fashion. The building temperature, relative humidity and metering data will be used to evaluate if all the models and calculations created for the WIRL during the design phase are reasonably close to reality and if the high performance wood structure is as energy efficient as predicted.
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Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) Building Research Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2577
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Performance
Sensors
Testing Methods
Energy Consumption
Thermal Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of this research is to investigate what differences, if any, exist between the modeled energy consumption and building envelope performance of the Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) building following eight months of in-situ data collection. The WIRL building was completed in July of 2018 by the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and is located in Prince George, British Columbia. Built in partnership with the Province of British Columbia, the building was designed to meet Passive House standards, a building certification system that requires the building to have low energy input requirements due to high levels of thermal insulation and minimal air leakage. To ensure the building achieves the established energy use targets set forth under the Passive House certification system, a computer model of the proposed building design must be completed prior to the start of construction using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) software. Inputs to the model include envelope design, mechanical energy use, building location and airtightness value. Key outputs included the predicted annual heating demand (kWh/m2a), total primary energy demand (kWh/m2a), and air tightness of the building envelope (ACH@50Pa). Based on the final building design model and test results achieved following completion, the WIRL building was deemed to have met all Passive House requirements and certification was achieved. To complete on-going data collection of the in-situ performance of the WIRL building, temperature and humidity sensors were installed in two of the exterior wall assemblies and the building’s floor. In addition, gas and electrical energy use meters were installed to monitor the building’s energy consumption. The installation of all equipment was made possible by Forest Innovation Investment through their 2018/2019 Wood First Program.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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7 records – page 1 of 1.