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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Cost, Time and Environmental Impacts of the Construction of the New NMIT Arts and Media Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue251
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
John, Stephen
Mulligan, Kerry
Perez, Nicolas
Love, Simon
Page, Ian
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life Cycle Cost Study
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report was produced by the University of Canterbury for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry under Expression of Interest MAF POL 0910-11665. The report covers extensive research carried out on the construction of the new Arts and Media building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology in Nelson, New Zealand, between March 2010 and June 2011. The collaborative research programme was directed by the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch. Major contributions to the research programme were made by third-party industry consultants and reported in separate documents – a copy of all the original reports is included in the Appendices ; ScionResearch - Carbon and Energy Footprint of a new three storey building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT), Simon Love (2011); BRANZ (Building Research Association of New Zealand) - Nelson-Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts Building – An assessement of life cycle costs for alternative designs (BRANZ report E568), Ian Page (2010); Aurecon Group and ISJ Architects (working together) – NMIT Alternative Structural Design; Ref. 210688-001 (August, 2010).
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Ductility of Dowelled New Zealand Douglas-Fir CLT Connections Under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2114
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls

Dynamic Behaviour of LVL-Concrete Composite Flooring Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue315
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Abd. Ghafar, Nor
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Dynamic Behaviour
Natural Frequency
Mode shape
Electrodynamic Shaker
Boundary Conditions
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This research focuses on the dynamic behaviour of long span LCC flooring systems. Experimental testing and finite element modelling was used to determine the dynamic behaviour, with particular regard to the natural frequency, fn and mode shape of an LCC floor. Both the experimental results and the finite element analyses agreed and showed that increased stiffness increased the natural frequency of the floor, and the boundary conditions influenced the dynamic behaviour of the LCC floor. Providing more restraint increased the stiffness of the floor system. The connectors' stiffness did not influence the dynamic performance of the floor. The research showed that a 8 m LCC long span floor can be constructed using LVL joists of between 300 mm to 400 mm depth with a concrete thickness of 65 mm for the longer spans, and joists of between 150 mm to 240 mm depth in conjunction with a concrete topping thickness of 100 mm for the shorter spans.
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Experimental testing and analytical modelling of glulam moment connections with self-drilling dowels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3011
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Dong, Wenchen
Li, Minghao
He, Minjuan
Li, Zhen
Organization
University of Canterbury
Tongji University
Publisher
ASCE
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Beam-column Connections
Moment Capacity
Self-drilling Dowels
Experimental Testing
Analytical Model
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Notes
Accepted Version
Summary
An experimental and analytical study on rotational behaviour of glulam beam-column moment connections with self-drilling dowels (SDD) was conducted. Connection properties including strength, stiffness, ductility and energy dissipation were experimentally evaluated by testing seven full-scale connection specimens with and without self-tapping screw (STS) reinforcement along timber perpendicular to grain. All the connections showed high initial stiffness and high moment capacity when compared with the test results of bolted connections reported in literature. The unreinforced connections had relatively low ductility due to timber splitting despite the increased fastener edge distance. The STS reinforcement effectively reduced timber splitting tendency and encouraged the yielding of more SDD, leading to slightly increased moment capacity, but significantly improved ductility. A modified analytical model (MAM) was then proposed to predict strength and rotation of the SDD moment connections based on force and moment equilibrium of the glulam members. Improved prediction accuracy was achieved for the SDD moment connections when compared with the past analytical methods.
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The Fire Performance of Post-Tensioned Timber Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue159
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Spellman, Phillip
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2012
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Failure Mechanisms
Full Scale
Post-Tensioning
Steel Tendons
Fire Resistance
Box Beams
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The focus of this research was to investigate the fire performance of post-tensioned timber beams. This was completed through a series of full-scale furnace tests, and the development of a fire resistance design method. Previous research has focused on the seismic performance and gravity frame performance of post-tensioned timber, both of which yielded promising results. There is however a commonly perceived increase in fire risk with timber building, particularly multi-storey timber buildings, and the fire performance of post-tensioned timber had not previously been investigated.
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The Fire Performance of Timber Floors in Multi-Storey Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue234
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
O'Neill, James
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Keywords
Abaqus
Finite Element Model
Full Scale
Furnace Tests
Charring Rate
Dead Load
Live Load
Zero-Strength Layer
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This research investigated the fire performance of unprotected timber floors, focussing on composite joist floors, composite box floors and timber-concrete composite floors. The study of these floors was conducted using the finite element software ABAQUS using a thermo-stress analysis in three dimensions, and with experimental fire tests of floor assemblies. The major goal of this research was to develop a simplified design approach for timber floors, validated against the numerical and experimental work. Four furnace tests were conducted on unprotected timber floor systems in the full-scale furnace at the BRANZ facilities in New Zealand. A sequentially coupled thermal-stress analysis was conducted to determine the effects of a fire on floor assemblies under load. The thermal modelling predicted the charring damage of the floors tested in the experiments to within a few millimetres of precision, and the simplified assumptions made in relation to fire inputs, boundary conditions, mesh refinement and effective material parameters were accurate to the desired level of precision. A sensitivity study was conducted comparing different mesh sizes, time step sizes, material model approaches and software suites to determine any shortfalls which may be encountered in the analysis. It was found that a material model adopting a latent heat approach was the most adequate for modelling timber in fires using these effective values, and mesh sizes of up to 6 mm produced relatively precise results. The structural modelling predicted the displacement response and failure times of the floors to within 20% of the experimental data, and the simplified assumptions made in relation to fire inputs, boundary conditions, mesh refinement and effective material properties were once again accurate to the desired level of precision. A modification to the reduction in tension strength at elevated temperatures was proposed to better predict the observed behaviour. A sensitivity study concluded that the material model definition plays a vital role in the output of the modelling. Non-standard fire exposures were also modelled for completeness. A simplified design method to estimate the fire resistance of unprotected floor assemblies was also developed. The method uses a bi-linear charring rate the assumption of a zero strength layer in the timber. The method was compared to the experimental data from this research and others around the world. The results were also compared to other charring rate methodologies from around the world.
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Floor Diaphragms in Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue71
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Thesis
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Diaphragms
Lateral Loads
Multi-Storey
Equivalent Truss Method
Pres-Lam
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis studies the behaviour of diaphragms in multi-storey timber buildings by providing methods for the estimation of the diaphragm force demand, developing an Equivalent Truss Method for the analysis of timber diaphragms, and experimentally investigating the effects of displacement incompatibilities between the diaphragm and the lateral load resisting system and developing methods for their mitigation. Although shortcomings in the estimation of force demand, and in the analysis and design of concrete floor diaphragms have already been partially addressed by other researchers, the behaviour of diaphragms in modern multi-storey timber buildings in general, and in low damage Pres-Lam buildings (consisting of post-tensioned timber members) in particular is still unknown. The analysis of light timber framing and massive timber diaphragms can be successfully analysed with an Equivalent Truss Method, which is calibrated by accounting for the panel shear and fastener stiffnesses. Finally, displacement incompatibilities in frame and wall structures can be accommodated by the flexibilities of the diaphragm panels and relative connections. A design recommendations chapter summarizes all findings and allows a designer to estimate diaphragm forces, to analyse the force path in timber diaphragms and to detail the connections to allow for displacement incompatibilities in multi-storey timber buildings.
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Fragility-based methodology for evaluating the time-dependent seismic performance of post-tensioned timber frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2871
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Seismic
Application
Frames
Author
Granello, Gabriele
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Organization
University of Canterbury
ETH Zurich
Sapienza University of Rome
Publisher
SAGE Journals
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Pres-Lam
Post-Tensioned Timber
Fragility Analysis
Seismic Performance
Research Status
Complete
Series
Earthquake Spectra
Summary
Since 2010, the construction of post-tensioned wooden buildings (Pres-Lam) has been growing rapidly worldwide. Pres-Lam technology combines unbonded post-tensioning tendons and supplemental damping devices to provide moment capacity to beam–column, wall–foundation, or column–foundation connections. In low seismic areas, designers may choose not to provide additional damping, relying only on the post-tensioning contribution. However, post-tensioning decreases over time due to creep phenomena arising in compressed timber members. As a consequence, there is a reduction of the clamping forces between the elements. This reduction affects the seismic response of Pres-Lam buildings in the case of low- and high-intensity earthquakes. Therefore, understanding and accounting for the post-tensioning losses and their uncertainty are paramount for a robust assessment of the safety of Pres-Lam constructions. So far, however, there have been no comprehensive studies which tackle the overall seismic performance of such systems in the presence of time-varying post-tension losses and the associated uncertainty. This study tackles this research gap by introducing a comprehensive seismic evaluation of Pres-Lam systems based on time-dependent fragility curves. The proposed fragility analysis is specifically designed to account systematically for time-varying post-tension losses and the related uncertainty. The method is applied to two case studies, designed, respectively, with and without supplemental damping devices. In terms of structural performance, results show that the use of additional dissipaters mitigates the effect of post-tensioning loss for earthquakes of high intensity. Conversely, performance under low-intensity earthquakes is strongly dependent on the post-tensioning value, as the reduction of stiffness due to the anticipated rocking motion activation would lead to damage to non-structural elements.
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NMIT Arts & Media Building—Innovative structural design of a three storey post-tensioned timber building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2851
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Holden, Tony
Devereux, Carl
Haydon, Shane
Buchanan, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Organization
Aurecon New Zealand
PTL Structural Timber Consultants
University of Canterbury
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Performance Based Design
Post-Tensioned Timber
Multi-Storey
Plastic Fuse
Research Status
Complete
Series
Case Studies in Structural Engineering
Summary
The NMIT Arts & Media Building in Nelson, New Zealand is the first in a new generation of multi-storey timber structures. It employs a number of innovative timber technologies including an advanced damage avoidance earthquake design that is a world first for a timber building. Aurecon structural engineers are the first to use this revolutionary Pres-Lam technology developed at the University of Canterbury. This technology marks a fundamental change in design philosophy. Conventional seismic design of multi-storey structures typically depends on member ductility and the acceptance of a certain amount of damage to beams, columns or walls. The NMIT seismic system relies on pairs of coupled timber shear walls that incorporate high strength steel tendons post-tensioned through a central duct. The walls are centrally fixed allowing them to rock during a seismic event. A series of U-shaped steel plates placed between the walls form a coupling mechanism, and act as dissipaters to absorb seismic energy. The design allows the primary structure to remain essentially undamaged in a major earthquake while readily replaceable connections act as plastic fuses. With a key focus on sustainability the extensive use of timber and engineered-wood products such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL) makes use of a local natural resource, all grown and manufactured within an 80 km radius of Nelson. This IstructE award winning project demonstrates that there are now cost effective, sustainable and innovative solutions for multi-storey timber buildings with potential applications for building owners in seismic areas around the world.
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Post-Tensioned Timber Frames with Supplemental Damping Devices

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1150
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Smith, Tobias
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Thesis
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Static Response
Dynamic Response
Lateral Loading
Beam-Column Joint
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In recent years the public expectation of what is acceptable in seismic resisting construction has changed significantly. Engineers today live under demands which are far more intensive than their historical counterparts and recent seismic events have shown that preserving life is no longer sufficient, and a preservation of livelihood is now the minimum. This means that after a major seismic event a building should not only be intact but be usable with no or minimal post-quake intervention. In addition to this already high expectation these demands must be met in a green and sustainable fashion with minimal (or even negative) environmental impact. This doctoral project looks to further advance the research into a new and innovative method of timber construction which satisfies (and exceeds) these demands.
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14 records – page 1 of 2.