Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Dynamic Behaviour of Dowel-Type Connections Under In-Service Vibration

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue884
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Frames
Beams
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Thesis
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Frames
Beams
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
dowel-type connections
Embedment
Nonlinear Behaviour
Time Dependent Behaviour
Energy Dissipation
Portal Frames
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study investigated the vibration serviceability of timber structures with dowel-type connections. It addressed the use of such connections in cutting-edge timber structures such as multi-storey buildings and long-span bridges, in which the light weight and flexibility of the structure make it possible that vibration induced by dynamic forces such as wind or footfall may cause discomfort to occupants or users of the structure, or otherwise impair its intended use. The nature of the oscillating force imposed on connections by this form of vibration was defined based on literature review and the use of established mathematical models. This allowed the appropriate cyclic load to be applied in experimental work on the most basic component of a dowel-type connection: a steel dowel embedding into a block of timber. A model for the stiffness of the timber in embedment under this cyclic load was developed based on an elastic stress function, which could then be used as the basis of a model for a complete connector. Nonlinear and time-dependent behaviour was also observed in embedment, and a simple rheological model incorporating elastic, viscoelastic and plastic elements was fitted to the measured response to cyclic load. Observations of the embedment response of the timber were then used to explain features of the behaviour of complete single- and multiple-dowel connections under cyclic load representative of in-service vibration. Complete portal frames and cantilever beams were tested under cyclic load, and a design method was derived for predicting the stiffness of such structures, using analytical equations based on the model for embedment behaviour. In each cyclic load test the energy dissipation in the specimen, which contributes to the damping in a complete structure, was measured. The analytical model was used to predict frictional energy dissipation in embedment, which was shown to make a significant contribution to damping in single-dowel connections. Based on the experimental results and analysis, several defining aspects of the dynamic response of the complete structures, such as a reduction of natural frequency with increased amplitude of applied load, were related to the observed and modelled embedment behaviour of the connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Fire and Structural Performance of Non-Metallic Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue152
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Creep
Deflection
Dowels
Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Model
Densified Veneer Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent studies showed the need for timber connections with high fire performance. Connections of members in timber structures commonly comprise steel connectors, such as dowels, screws, nails and toothed plates. However, multiple studies have shown that the presence of exposed metal in timber connections leads to a poor performance under fire conditions. Replacing metallic fasteners with non-metallic fasteners potentially enhances the fire performance of timber connections. Previous studies showed that Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) dowels can be a viable replacement for steel dowels and that Densified Veneer Wood functions well as a flitch plate material. However, as the resin matrix of GFRP dowels is viscoelastic, connection creep, which is not studied before, can be of concern. Also no research has been carried out on the fire performance of these connections. Therefore, a study of the creep behaviour and the fire performance of non-metallic timber connections comprising GFRP dowels and a Densified Veneer Wood flitch plate was performed, as is discussed in this thesis. Predictive models were proposed to determine the connection slip and load bearing capacity at ambient and elevated temperatures and in a fire. The material properties and heat transfer properties required for these models were determined experimentally and predictions of these models were experimentally validated. Furthermore, an adjustment of the predictive model of connection slip at ambient temperature allowed approximating the creep of the connection. The material properties, required for the creep model, were determined experimentally and predictions of the model were compared to results of longterm connection tests. The study confirmed that timber members jointed with non-metallic connectors have a significantly improved fire performance to timber joints using metallic connections. Models developed and proposed to predict fire performance gave accurate predictions of time to failure. It was concluded that non-metallic connections showed more creep per load per connector, than metallic connections. However, the ratio between initial deflection and creep (relative creep) and the ratio between load level and creep were shown to be similar for metallic and non-metallic connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Performance of Glue-Laminated Beams from Malaysian Dark Red Meranti Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1822
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Ong, Chee Beng
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Thesis
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Malaysian Dark Red Meranti (DRM)
Production
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Fabrication
Bonding Performance
Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Tension Face
Unreinforced
Fire Test
Failure
Finger Joints
Softwood
Europe
Density
End Pressure
Cramping Pressure
Strength
Charring Rate
Fire Performance
Polyurethane
Bending Strength
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study, Malaysian Dark Red Meranti (DRM) was used to manufacture glulam beams, following closely the requirements of BS EN 14080:2013 so as to emulate commercial production. Phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF), commonly used in structural glulam production, was used in the fabrication of finger joints and laminations of the glulam beams. Factors influencing the mechanical properties of finger joints and bonding performance of laminations were investigated. Full size glulam beams were manufactured and tested in bending with partial and complete carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement on the tension face and compared with the performance of unreinforced beams. A bench-scale fire test was proposed to describe the behaviour of DRM finger joints in tension under fire condition, in order to simulate the failure of finger joints on the tension side of a glulam beam in a standard fire test. Overall, DRM finger joints exhibited better bending strength than Spruce finger joints which represented softwood used in European glulam. Wood density and end pressure were shown to affect the strength properties of the finger joints. Higher cramping pressure was needed to produce DRM laminations with higher shear strength. The glulam beam with CFRP reinforcement had a higher bending strength than the unreinforced glulam beams but partial reinforcement had an adverse effect on beam strength. In the bench-scale fire test, DRM finger-jointed specimens exhibited lower charring rate than Spruce. Furthermore, PRF finger-jointed specimens showed better fire performance than finger-jointed specimens bonded with polyurethane (PUR) adhesive. In conclusion, it is hoped that results from this research will motivate engineers and architects in Malaysia to design and build structures from less-utilised local timber, specifically in the form of glulam, encouraging the timber industry in Malaysia to produce them commercially.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Strut and Tie Modelling of Cross-Laminated Timber Panels Incorporating Angular Material Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue248
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Pearson, Hannah
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Grain Angles
Strut and Tie Model
Panels
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The use of Cross-Laminated Timber products has increased in recent years with a range of structural applications including CLT tall buildings and folded structures. As CLT is used in more innovative structural applications the need for specific methods of design and analysis are apparent. A review of the literature demonstrates that despite the increasing popularity of CLT in construction there are limited methods for the design and analysis of CLT panels and structures that fully utilise its unique properties. Manufacturer data relating to the CLT material properties varies how the cross directional laminas are considered. Finally it was found that there is limited published knowledge regarding CLT material properties for panels loaded non-tangentially to the direction of the timber grain. A method for predicting failure loads and modes has been presented and compared with experimental test data. A Strut and Tie model is proposed for the analysis of CLT panels, a methodology originally developed to design of reinforced concrete deep beams. The Strut and Tie approach considers panel geometry, loads, supports, different properties in tension and compression and was adapted to consider anisotropic behaviour. The procedure, advantages and limitations have been presented and a model developed for an application in CLT. The use of this model is considered for the analysis of simple CLT panel loadings. The behaviour of CLT at different timber grain angles demonstrate a complex composite behaviour influencing the strut and tie capacities. The definition of node sizes was also found to be critical to the definitions of the struts and ties and hence the capacity of the sections. Comparison of experimental tests to the model demonstrates some application to using a Strut and Tie in CLT panels. It identifies where additional investigation is required to improve, develop and validate the model into a method that may be used for full-scale CLT panels and structures in design practice and consider a variety of geometries and loading arrangements.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Thin Topping Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue902
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Skinner, Jonathan
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stiffness
Vibration Response
Topping Thickness
Screws
shear connectors
Static Loads
Cyclic Loads
Short-term
Bending Tests
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) combines timber and concrete, utilising the complementary properties of each material. The composite is designed in such a way that the timber resists combined tension and bending, whilst the concrete resists combined compression and bending. This construction technique can be used either in new build construction, or in refurbishment, for upgrading existing timber structures. Its use is most prolific in continental Europe, Australasia, and the United States of America but has yet to be widely used in the United Kingdom. To date, the topping upgrades used have been 40mm thick or greater. Depending on the choice of shear connection, this can lead to a four-fold increase in strength and stiffness of the floor. However, in many practical refurbishment situations, such a large increase in stiffness is not required, therefore a thinner topping can suffice. The overarching aim of this study has been to develop a thin (20mm) topping timber-concrete composite upgrade with a view to improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors. Particular emphasis was given to developing an understanding of how the upgrade changes the stiffness and transient vibration response of a timber floor. Initially, an analytical study was carried out to define an appropriate topping thickness. An experimental testing programme was then completed to: characterise suitable shear connectors under static and cyclic loads, assess the benefit of the upgrade to the short-term bending performance of panels and floors, and evaluate the influence of the upgrade on the transient vibration response of a floor. For refurbishing timber floors, a 20mm thick topping sufficiently increased the bending stiffness and improved the transient vibration response. The stiffness of the screw connectors was influenced by the thickness of the topping and the inclination of the screws. During the short-term bending tests, the gamma method provided a non-conservative prediction of composite bending stiffness. In the majority of cases the modal frequencies of the floors tested increased after upgrade, whilst the damping ratios decreased. The upgrade system was shown to be robust as cracking of the topping did not influence the short-term bending performance of panels. Thin topping TCC upgrades offer a practical and effective solution to building practitioners, for improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail