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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Effects of Fuel Load and Exposed CLT Surface Configuration in Reduced-Scale Experiments

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2047
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bateman, Christopher
Bartlett, Alastair
Rutkauskas, Lukas
Hadden, Rory
Organization
The University of Edinburgh
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Auto-Extinction
Fuel Load
Delamination
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
With increasing regularity, compartments with exposed timber boundaries are being proposed in high-rise buildings. However, due to the combustible nature of timber, the fire-specific risks associated with these decisions must be thoroughly explored. In particular the requirement that the timber stops burning after the imposed fuel load has been consumed must be fulfilled. By means of reduced scale experiments it was determined that sustained burning was dependent on both the configuration of exposed faces and, to a lesser extent, the imposed fuel load. The principal factor for auto-extinction or otherwise was found to be in the configuration of exposed surfaces, with two exposed walls (in this case back and side wall) consistently resulting in sustained burning. When a wall and the ceiling were left exposed (wall opposite the compartment opening and ceiling), auto-extinction occurred for all but the highest fuel load considered. The occurrence of char fall-off (delamination) was significant in promoting sustained burning and was observed to cause a transition from apparent extinction back to flaming in one experiment.
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Enclosure Fire Dynamics with a Cross-Laminated Timber Ceiling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2690
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Author
McNamee, Robert
Zehfuss, Jochen
Bartlett, Alastair
Heidari, Mohammad
Robert, Fabienne
Bisby, Luke
Organization
Technische Universität Braunschweig
The University of Edinburgh
Publisher
Wiley Online Library
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Ceilings
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Fire Dynamics
Parametric Fire Models
Compartment Fire Test
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire and Materials
Summary
An experimental study of the influence of an exposed combustible ceiling on compartment fire dynamics has been performed. The fire dynamics in compartments with combustible cross-laminated timber ceilings vs non-combustible reinforced concrete ceilings in otherwise identical compartments with three different ventilation factors were investigated. The experimental results are compared against predictions from two theoretical models for compartment fire dynamics: (a) the parametric fire model given in EN 1991-1-2, and (b) a model developed at Technische Universität Braunschweig, which are the parametric fire models currently used in Germany. It is confirmed that the introduction of a combustible timber ceiling leads to higher temperatures within the enclosure, both under fuel-controlled and ventilation-controlled scenarios. It is also demonstrated that the theoretical models considered in this article require refinement in order to adequately represent all relevant scenarios when combustible ceilings are present. A refinement of the German model, by adding the fuel from the combustible ceiling to the occupancy fuel load, was shown to not adequately capture the response for the ventilation-controlled fires.
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Large-scale compartment fires to develop a self-extinction design framework for mass timber—Part 1: Literature review and methodology

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2911
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Xu, Hangyu
Pope, Ian
Gupta, Vinny
Cadena, Jaime
Carrascal, Jeronimo
Lange, David
McLaggan, Martyn
Mendez, Julian
Osorio, Andrés
Solarte, Angela
Soriguer, Diana
Torero, Jose
Wiesner, Felix
Zaben, Abdulrahman
Hidalgo, Juan
Organization
The University of Queesland
University of College London
The University of Edinburgh
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Performance-based Design
Compartment Fires
Heat Transfer
Pretection of Wood
Large-scale
Mass Timber
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
Fire safety remains a major challenge for engineered timber buildings. Their combustible nature challenges the design principles of compartmentation and structural integrity beyond burnout, which are inherent to the fire resistance framework. Therefore, self-extinction is critical for the fire-safe design of timber buildings. This paper is the first of a three-part series that seeks to establish the fundamental principles underpinning a design framework for self-extinction of engineered timber. The paper comprises: a literature review introducing the body of work developed at material and compartment scales; and the design of a large-scale testing methodology which isolates the fundamental phenomena to enable the development and validation of the required design framework. Research at the material scale has consolidated engineering principles to quantify self-extinction using external heat flux as a surrogate of the critical mass loss rate, and mass transfer or Damköhler numbers. At the compartment scale, further interdependent, complex phenomena influencing self-extinction occurrence have been demonstrated. Time-dependent phenomena include encapsulation failure, fall-off of charred lamellae and the burning of the movable fuel load, while thermal feedback is time-independent. The design of the testing methodology is described in reference to these fundamental phenomena.
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Novel Testing for Stiffness Reductions of Cross-Laminated Timber at Elevated Temperature

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2454
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams

The structural capacity of laminated timber compression elements in fire: A meta-analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3003
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Walls
Author
Wiesner, Felix
Bisby, Luke
Organization
The University of Edinburgh
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Structural Timber
Compression
Fire Resistance
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Safety Journal
Summary
Modern building construction is increasingly applying laminated timber products as structural members for larger and more ambitious projects, both commercial and residential. As a consequence, designers require reliable knowledge and design tools to assess the structural capacity of laminated mass timber elements in fire. This paper reviews and assesses available data and methods to design for fire resistance of laminated mass timber compression elements. Historical data from fire resistance tests is presented and compared against the available design calculation methods. The underlying assumptions of the thermal and structural analyses applied within the presented calculation methodologies are discussed. The resulting meta-analysis suggests that the available methods are all able to make reasonable predictions (with an average mean absolute error (MAPE) of 22% across methods) of the fire resistance of glued-laminated columns exposed to standard fires; however, the available methods for CLT walls give inconsistent (MAPE of 46% across all methods and 30% excluding extreme outliers) and potentially non-conservative results (up to 88% of investigated cases are statistically non-conservative). Additional research on loaded compression elements is therefore needed.
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Structural Capacity of One-Way Spanning Large-Scale Cross-Laminated Timber Slabs in Standard and Natural Fires

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2734
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Author
Wiesner, Felix
Bartlett, Alastair
Mohaine, Siyimane
Robert, Fabienne
McNamee, Robert
Mindeguia, Jean-Christophe
Bisby, Luke
Organization
University of Queensland
The University of Edinburgh
CERIB Fire Testing Centre
Brandskyddslaget
University of Bordeaux
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Topic
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deflection
Temperature
Load Bearing Capacity
Ventilation
Fire Safety
Research Status
Complete
Series
Fire Technology
Summary
This paper describes selected observations, measurements, and analysis from a series of large-scale experiments on cross-laminated timber (CLT) slabs that were exposed to fire from below, using four different heating scenarios, with a sustained mechanical loading of 6.3 kN m per metre width of slab. The deflection response and in-depth timber temperatures are used to compare the experimental response against a relatively simple structural fire model to assess the load bearing capacity of CLT elements in fire, including during the decay phase of natural fires. It is demonstrated that the ventilation conditions in experiments with a fixed fuel load are important in achieving burnout of the contents before structural collapse occurs. A mechanics-based structural fire model is shown to provide reasonably accurate predictions of structural failure (or lack thereof) for the experiments presented herein. The results confirm the importance of the ventilation conditions on the fire dynamics, burning duration, and the achievement of functional fire safety objectives (i.e. maintaining stability and compartmentation), in compartments with exposed CLT.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.