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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Behavior of CLT Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2188
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Screws
Tall Wood
Earthquake
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Thomas Miller at Oregon State University
Summary
Understanding how roof and floor systems (commonly called diaphragms by engineers) that are built from Pacific Northwest-sourced cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels perform in earthquake prone areas is a critical area of research. These building components are key to transferring normal and extreme event forces into walls and down to the foundation. The tests performed in this project will provide data on commonly used approaches to connecting CLT panels within a floor or roof space and the performance of associated screw fasteners. Structural engineers will directly benefit through improved modeling tools. A broader benefit may be increased confidence in the construction of taller wood buildings in communities at greater risk for earthquakes.
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Composite Concrete-CLT Floor Systems for Tall Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2196
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Fire
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Fire Resistance
Stiffness
Acoustics
Vibration
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Christopher Higgins at Oregon State University
Summary
This project will optimize the strength, stiffness, vibration characteristics, acoustic qualities and fire resistance of cross-laminated floor systems utilizing a composite concrete and cross-laminated timber product. This project includes development, testing and optimization of an economical shear connector (to connect the CLT panel to the concrete slab) that will be compared with existing screw and steel plate solutions. The resulting prototype floor system will be tested at full scale.
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Concrete Composite Floors Using Radiant Panel Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2259
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Mass Timber
Acoustics
Vibration
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact: Erica Fischer, Oregon State University
Summary
In many mass timber buildings, CLT or nail laminated timber (NLT) floors are designed with a concrete topping to improve acoustic separation, reduce vibration or act as a fire barrier. Little research has examined the fire behavior of these floor systems, but some preliminary tests involving LVL show that they may be able to meet three-hour fire resistance ratings, which could potentially open up the use of mass timber in Type I buildings, representing a large market opportunity. This project will test the behavior of composite floors under fire loading conditions considering the following parameters: shear connector type, mass timber panel types and thicknesses and concrete thicknesses. It will also test and validate an innovative fire research methodology using radiant panels.
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Cross-Laminated Timber Fasteners Solutions for Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2197
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Wall-to-Floor
Wall-to-Wall
Wall-to-Foundation
Strength Properties
Screw Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Arijit Sinha at Oregon State University
Summary
Constructing buildings with CLT requires development of novel panel attachment methods and mechanisms. Architects and engineers need to know the engineering strength properties of connected panels, especially in an earthquake prone area. This project will improve knowledge of three types of wall panel connections: wall-to-floor, wall-to-wall, and wall-to-foundation. Testing will determine the strength properties of metal connectors applied with diffferent types and sizes of screw fasteners. The data will be used to develop a modeling tool that engineers can use when designing multi-story buildings to be constructed with CLT panels.
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Development of Isocyanate-Free and Formaldehyde-Free Adhesives for CLT

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2266
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
General Application
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bonding
Plywood
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact: Kaichang Li, Oregon State University
Summary
This project aims to develop a commercially-viable wood adhesive for CLT that is free of formaldehyde and isocyanates and possesses good cure speed properties. Li and his team have successfully developed adhesives for plywood manufacturing using abundant, inexpensive and renewable soy flour. This adhesive mimics the superior bonding properties of mussel additive proteins. Emission of hazardous air pollutants from plywood plants that use this adhesive has dropped 50-90 percent. Development of such an adhesive for CLT would address increasingly stringent air quality regulations in many places such as Oregon and California. The existing chemical formulation for the plywood adhesive will be adapted for use in a cold-pressing process. Specimens will be created at the OSU wood composites labs and first tested to verify conformance with the PRG320 product standard for CLT. Specimens passing the tests will be sent to the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory at the University of Oregon, Portland, where they will be conditioned and tested to determine emission characteristics.
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Durability and Protection of CLT in Parking Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2267
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Mass Timber
Stress Tests
Weathering
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact:Lech Muszynski, Oregon State University
Summary
The City of Springfield, Oregon hired SRG Partnership to design a CLT parking structure slated to be built in a new redevelopment zone on the Willamette River. The concept started as an academic exercise in a University of Oregon architectural design studio course led by Professor Judith Sheine. Mayor Christine Lundberg saw an opportunity to connect Springfield’s historic roots in the timber industry to the burgeoning new mass timber sector, and the project became a reality. Before the structure is built, important technical questions must be addressed concerning how to protect the timber elements against the Pacific Northwest weather and long-term dynamic loading from vehicles. A technical team from OSU’s Department of Wood Science and Engineering and School of Civil and Construction Engineering are narrowing down combinations of materials for testing. Proposed solutions include an asphalt topping on the CLT decking, similar to those often used on timber bridge decks. Stress tests will be conducted, simulating forces from vehicles turning, starting and stopping and backing up. Simulated weather testing will also be conducted in OSU’s multi-chamber modular environmental conditioning chamber. The Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory at University of Oregon has conducted wind-driven rain studies to inform SRG’s design of the roof and exterior screening elements.
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Fire Resistance of Unprotected CLT Floors & Walls Manufactured in the U.S.

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2262
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Douglas-Fir
SPF
Connections
Adhesives
Structural Integrity
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact: Lech Muszynski, Oregon State University
Summary
This project will document the flammability of Douglas-fir and spruce-pine-fir CLT panel assemblies produced in the United States. Tests are being conducted on wall and floor panel assemblies with standard overlapping connections and produced with two different types of commonly-used adhesives. Sensors placed throughout panels will provide data about how fire affects the interior and exterior of a panel. A thermal imaging camera will provide information on how the structural integrity of panels is affected by fire and fire suppression activities.
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Impact of Moisture on Post-tensioned Rocking Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2274
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Seismic
Moisture
Rocking Walls
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Andre Barbosa.
Summary
Resilient structures are buildings designed not only to protect life safety in a seismic event but also to preserve the structural integrity of the major components of the buildings so that they can be reoccupied quickly and at minimal cost. An example is a CLT rocking wall system, utilizing post-tensioned cables and energy dissipating-connectors, which is being used for the first time in North America in OSU’s new Peavy Hall. CLT rocking walls borrow from concepts used in concrete and steel structures that were later adapted to LVL building systems in New Zealand. This project will examine the impacts of wetting at the base of the wall on the structural capacity and cyclic performance of the system. Identical rocking wall systems will undergo structural testing, with one being subjected to simulated moisture intrusion that may occur during construction. The findings will provide important information that can be later implemented in design and construction guidelines.
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Life Cycle Analysis of Old and New Peavy Hall

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2332
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Paul Frederik Laleicke at North Carolina State University
Summary
This project assesses and compares the environmental impacts of forest products used in the old (1999) Peavy Hall teaching building at Oregon State University and the new mass timber building that will be completed in 2018. The findings will be incorporated in updated guidelines for life cycle analyses that fully take into account the role of reclaimable wood building products.
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Living Lab at Peavy Hall: Structural Health Performance of Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2275
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Keywords
Mass Timber
Monitoring Techniques
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Building on the results of an earlier project that established protocols for post-occupancy building monitoring, this project aims to install a system in the new Peavy Hall building at Oregon State University to monitor moisture, relative humidity, vertical and slip movements due to shrinkage & deflection, post-tensioning losses, vibration and seismic activity. The monitoring system will establish a “living” laboratory that demonstrates in real time how the mass timber components of the building are affected by various internal and external phenomena. The data will be gathered and analyzed over the service life of the building.
Summary
Project contact is Mariapaola Riggio.
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17 records – page 1 of 2.