Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Blast Testing of Loaded Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1234
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Weaver, Mark
Newberry, Charles
Podesto, Lisa
O’Laughlin, Casey
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Blast Tests
Airblast Loads
Axial Load
Panels
Load Distribution
Quasi-Static
Language
English
Conference
Structures Conference 2018
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 19–21, 2018, Fort Worth, Texas
Summary
Results from a series of blast tests performed in October 2016 on three two-story, single-bay cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures demonstrated the ability of CLT construction to resist airblast loads in a predictable fashion. These tests were performed on structures without superimposed load to limit inertial resistance. Subsequently, a follow-on series of tests was performed to investigate the response of axially-loaded CLT construction. Panels damaged during the preceding test were removed and replaced. Axial load was applied using precast concrete blocks to simulate the loaded condition of a five-story building at the first-floor front panel of the structures. These test structures were exposed to two shots: the first was designed to keep the structures within their respective elastic ranges while the second was designed to push the structures beyond their elastic limits. Reflected pressure and peak deflections were recorded at the front panels of the test structures to document the two-way panel load distribution behavior under a dynamic load event and the clearing of the shock wave. Prior to conducting the blast tests, a small number of tests were performed on a load tree test apparatus to aid in test planning by investigating the post-peak response of individual CLT panels of various lengths to quasi-static out-of-plane and axial loads applied simultaneously. This paper provides an overview of the results obtained from both the quasi-static and blast tests of axially-loaded CLT. Additionally, the paper compares CLT structure, component, and connection response across the suite of data. Conclusions are offered to assist engineers in the design of load bearing CLT construction exposed to airblast loads.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
Less detail

Structural Performance of the Second Oldest Glued-Laminated Structure in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1118
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Author
Rammer, Douglas
de Melo Moura, Jorge
Ross, Robert
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Uniform Loading
Deformation
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
The second glued-laminated structure built in the United States was constructed at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in 1934 to demonstrate the performance of wooden arch buildings. After 75 years of use the structure was decommissioned in 2010. Shortly after construction, researchers structurally evaluated the gluedlaminated arch structure for uniform loading on the center arch. This structural system evaluation was added to the existing laboratory work on glued-laminated arches to develop the foundation on which the current glued-laminated arch design criteria is based. After 75 years of service and decommisioning, recovered arches were tested in the laboratory to evaluate the loss of structural performance. Loss of structural performance was evaluated by comparing original and current deformation. Based on a preliminary visual and structural assessment, the degradation of structural performance was minimal in the arches, except for two arch that were affected by the building fire.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail