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Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue432
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Lakshman, Ruthwik
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ductility
Self-Tapping Screws
Stiffness
Strength
Vertical Shear Loading
Mid-Scale
Quasi-Static
Shear Tests
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) is increasingly gaining popularity in residential and non-residential applications in North America. To use CLT as lateral load resisting system, individual panels need to be connected. In order to provide in-plane shear connections, CLT panels may be joined with a variety of options including the use of self-tapping-screws (STS) in surface splines and half-lap joints. Alternatively, STS can be installed at an angle to the plane allowing for simple butt joints and avoiding any machining. This study investigated the performance of CLT panel assemblies connected with STS under vertical shear loading. The three aforementioned options were applied to join 3ply and 5-ply CLT panels. A total of 60 mid-scale quasi-static shear tests were performed to determine and compare the connection performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and ductility. It was shown that – depending on the screw layout – either very stiff or very ductile joint performance can be achieved.
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Structural Design, Approval, and Monitoring of a UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1252
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Moudgil, Ermanu
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Vertical Shrinkage
Horizontal Building Vibration
Structural Performance
Concrete Core
Brock Commons
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2017
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 6–8, 2017, Denver, Colorado
Summary
In this paper, we discuss the structural design of one of the tallest timber-based hybrid buildings in the world: the 18 storey, 53 meter tall student residence on the campus of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. The building is of hybrid construction: 17 storeys of mass wood construction on top of one storey of concrete construction. Two concrete cores containing vertical circulation provide the required lateral resistance. The timber system is comprised of cross-laminated timber panels, which are point supported on glued-laminated timber columns and steel connections between levels. In addition to providing more than 400 beds for students, the building will serve as an academic site to monitor and study its structural performance, specifically horizontal building vibration and vertical shrinkage considerations. We present the challenges relating to the approval process of the building and discuss building code compliance issues.
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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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