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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Experimental Investigations of Post-Tensioned Timber Frames with Advanced Seismic Damping Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue464
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Smith, Tobias
Carradine, David
Di Cesare, Antonio
Carlo Ponzo, Felice
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Nigro, Domenico
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Energy Dissipation
Full Scale
Post-Tensioning
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2012
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 29-31, 2012, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Summary
This paper describes initial experimental testing to investigate feasible sources of passive damping for the seismic design of post-tensioned glue laminated timber structures. These innovative high performance structural systems extend precast concrete PRESSS technology to engineered wood structures, combining the use of post-tensioning bars or cables with large post-tensioned timber members. The combination of these two elements provides elastic recentering to the structure while the addition of damping using a specialised energy dissipation system gives the desirable `flag shaped' hysteretic response under lateral loading. Testing has been performed on a full scale beam-column joint at the University of Basilicata in Italy in a collaborative project with the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The experimental testing uses engineered wood products, extending the use of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) structures tested in New Zealand to testing of glue laminated timber (glulam) structures in Italy. Current testing is aimed at further improvement of the system through additional energy dissipation systems.
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Truss Plates for Use as Wood-Concrete Composite Shear Connectors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue732
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Author
Clouston, Peggi
Schreyer, Alexander
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
shear connectors
Truss Plates
Slip-modulus
Ultimate Shear Capacity
Push-Out
Bending Stiffness
Strength
Four Point Bending Test
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2011
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 14-16, 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
Summary
Wood-concrete composite systems are well established, structurally efficient building systems for both new construction and rehabilitation of old timber structures. Composite action is achieved through a mechanical device to integrally connect in shear the two material components, wood and concrete. Depending on the device, different levels of composite action and thus efficiency are achieved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structural feasibility and effectiveness of using truss plates, typically used in the making of metal-plate-connected wood trusses, as shear connectors for laminated veneer lumber (LVL)-concrete composite systems. The experimental program consisted of two studies. The first study established slip-modulus and ultimate shear capacity of the truss plates when used in an LVL-concrete push out assembly. The second study evaluated overall composite bending stiffness and strength in two full size T-beams when subjected to four-point bending. One beam employed two continuous rows of truss plates and the other employed one row. It was found that the initial stiffness of both T-beams was similar for one and two rows of truss plates but that the ultimate capacity was approximately 20% less with the use of only one row.
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Timber Tower Research: Concrete Jointed Timber Frame

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue440
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Baker, William
Horos, David
Johnson, Benton
Schultz, Joshua
Organization
Structures Congress
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide Emissions
Tall Wood
Concrete Jointed Timber Frame
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
The goal of this research was to develop a structural system for tall buildings using mass-timber as the main structural material that reduces the carbon dioxide emissions associated with the structure. The structural system research was applied to a prototypical building based on an existing concrete benchmark for comparison. This paper discusses key design issues associated with tall mass-timber buildings along with potential solutions. It is believed that the system proposed in the research and discussed in the paper could mitigate many of these design issues. The main structural mass-timber elements are connected by steel reinforcing through cast-in-place concrete at the connection joints. This system plays to the strengths of both materials and allows the designer to apply sound tall building engineering fundamentals. The result is believed to be an efficient structure that could compete with reinforced concrete and structural steel while reducing the associated carbon emissions by 60 to 75%.
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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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Structural Performance of the Second Oldest Glued-Laminated Structure in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1118
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Author
Rammer, Douglas
de Melo Moura, Jorge
Ross, Robert
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Arches
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Uniform Loading
Deformation
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
The second glued-laminated structure built in the United States was constructed at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in 1934 to demonstrate the performance of wooden arch buildings. After 75 years of use the structure was decommissioned in 2010. Shortly after construction, researchers structurally evaluated the gluedlaminated arch structure for uniform loading on the center arch. This structural system evaluation was added to the existing laboratory work on glued-laminated arches to develop the foundation on which the current glued-laminated arch design criteria is based. After 75 years of service and decommisioning, recovered arches were tested in the laboratory to evaluate the loss of structural performance. Loss of structural performance was evaluated by comparing original and current deformation. Based on a preliminary visual and structural assessment, the degradation of structural performance was minimal in the arches, except for two arch that were affected by the building fire.
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Displacement Design Procedure for Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Rocking Walls with Sacrificial Dampers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue395
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Gu, Mengzhe
Pang, Weichiang
Schiff, Scott
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Energy Dissipation
Ductile Behavior
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Self-centering Mechanism
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
This paper presents the preliminary design of a rocking Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) wall using a displacement-based design procedure. The CLT wall was designed to meet three performance expectations: immediate occupancy (IO), life safety (LS), and collapse prevention (CP). Each performance expectation is defined in terms of an inter-story drift limit with a predefined non-exceedance probability at a given hazard level. U-shape flexural plates were used to connect the vertical joint between the CLT panels to obtain a ductile behavior and adequate energy dissipation during seismic motion. A design method for ensuring self-centering mechanism is also presented.
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Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue432
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hossain, Afrin
Lakshman, Ruthwik
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ductility
Self-Tapping Screws
Stiffness
Strength
Vertical Shear Loading
Mid-Scale
Quasi-Static
Shear Tests
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
Cross-Laminated-Timber (CLT) is increasingly gaining popularity in residential and non-residential applications in North America. To use CLT as lateral load resisting system, individual panels need to be connected. In order to provide in-plane shear connections, CLT panels may be joined with a variety of options including the use of self-tapping-screws (STS) in surface splines and half-lap joints. Alternatively, STS can be installed at an angle to the plane allowing for simple butt joints and avoiding any machining. This study investigated the performance of CLT panel assemblies connected with STS under vertical shear loading. The three aforementioned options were applied to join 3ply and 5-ply CLT panels. A total of 60 mid-scale quasi-static shear tests were performed to determine and compare the connection performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and ductility. It was shown that – depending on the screw layout – either very stiff or very ductile joint performance can be achieved.
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Timber-Concrete Composites Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue616
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Mid-Scale
Push-Out Tests
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems have been employed as an efficient solution in medium span structural applications; their use remains largely confined to European countries. TCC systems are generally comprised of a timber and concrete element with a shear connection between. A large number of precedents for T-beam configurations exist; however, the growing availability of flat plate engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America has offered designers greater versatility in terms of floor plans and architectural expression in modern timber and hybrid structures. The opportunity exists to enhance the strength, stiffness, fire, and vibration performance of floors using these products by introducing a concrete topping, connected to the timber to form a composite. A research program at the University of British Columbia Vancouver investigates the performance of five different connector types (a post-installed screw system, cast-in screws, glued-in steel mesh, adhesive bonded, and mechanical interlocking) in three different EWPs (Cross-Laminated-Timber, Laminated-Veneer-Lumber, and Laminated-Strand-Lumber). Over 200 mid-scale push-out tests were performed in the first stage of experimental work to evaluate the connector performance and to optimize the design of subsequent vibration and bending testing of full-scale specimens, including specimens subjected to long-term loading.
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Seismic Design and Analysis of a 20-Storey Demonstration Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue667
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Chui, Ying Hei
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Nonlinear time history analysis
Demonstration Building
Finite Element Model
Wood-Steel
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
This paper presents the seismic design and analysis of a 20-storey demonstration wood building, which was conducted as a part of the NEWBuildS tall wood building design project. A hybrid lateral load resisting system was chosen for the building. The system consisted of shear walls and a shear core, both made of structural composite lumber, connected with dowel-type connections and heavy-duty HSK (wood-steel-composite) system. The core and the shear walls were linked with horizontal steel beams at each floor. The wood-based panel-to-panel interface was designed to be the main energy dissipating mechanism of the system. A detailed finite element model of this building was developed and non-linear time history analyses were performed using 10 earthquake motions. The results showed that the seismic response of the 20-storey demonstration building met the various design criteria and the design details are appropriate.
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Investigation into the Failure of a Long-Span Glued Laminated Beam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1251
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Shuck, Andrew
Porto, Jason
Sasaki, Kent
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Failure
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2017
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 6–8, 2017, Denver, Colorado
Summary
The failure of wood roof members in older buildings is a fairly common occurrence compared to systems built of steel or concrete. The slow-working detrimental effect of sustained loading at relatively high stress levels (i.e., “creep rupture” or “cumulative damage”) is typically viewed as the predominant failure mechanism, but this is not always the case. The following describes a case study of a glulam beam that failed for other reasons. The subject glulam beam that failed absent a significant atypical loading event was one of many in the roof structure of a large building. Each glulam beam was about five feet deep and 100 feet long. At the time of failure, the subject glulam beam was 41 years old. Through the course of the investigation, significant research was performed into multiple aspects of glulam beam behavior, including revisions to design stresses over time, fabrication technology, and time-dependent properties. Detailed field observations were performed to document the failed beam, the surrounding elements, and the assemblies supported by the roof framing. The cause of the failure was ultimately found to be a fabrication error.
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16 records – page 1 of 2.