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Bending and Rolling Shear Capacities of Southern Pine Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1596
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gu, Mengzhe
Pang, Weichiang
Stoner, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Southern Pine
US
Manufacturing
Rolling Shear
Bending
Three Point Bending Test
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1899-1906
Summary
Southern Pine (SP) is one of the fastest growing softwood species in the Southern Forest of United States. With its high strength to weight ratio, SP becomes an ideal candidate for manufacturing engineered wood products such as cross laminated timber (CLT). Two batches of CLT panels were manufactured using visually graded SP lumbers in this study: pilot-scale panels in a laboratory setting and full-size panels in a manufacturing plant environment. The first batch of pilot-scale CLT panels was manufactured at Clemson University. The second batch of full-scale CLT panels (3m x 12.2m) was produced and CNC-sized by Structurlam in Penticton, Canada and shipped to Clemson University for testing. Four types of structural wood adhesives were selected in the panel production, namely Melamine Formaldehyde (MF), Phenol Resorcinol Formaldehyde (PRF), Polyurethane (PUR) and Emulsion Polymer Isocyanate (EPI). This paper presents the manufacturing process of SP CLT in a laboratory setting as well as structural performance verification of 3- ply SP CLT in terms of rolling shear and bending properties. The obtained performance data of 3-ply CLT in both major and minor strength directions is verified against PRG-320 Standard for Performance Rated Cross Laminated Timber. Tested results are presented and discussed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber as a Residential Building Material Subject to Tornado Events

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2523
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Wind
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems

Simulated Performance of Cross-Laminated Timber Residential Structures Subject to Tornadoes

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2973
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Stoner, Michael
Pang, Weichiang
Organization
Clemson University
Publisher
Frontiers
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Tornado
Structural Performance
Load Path
Fragility Analysis
Residential Construction
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
Summary
Tornadoes are some of the most severe and devastating natural events and cause significant damage to structures in the United States. Light-frame wood residential structures have shown vulnerabilities to these events, but they are not explicitly addressed in the design requirements due to their infrequent occurrence, relatively small impact area (compared to hurricanes), and complex wind profile. This paper explores the potential of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) to serve as a residential building material, specifically with regards to its performance in tornado events. CLT is an engineered wood product made when orthogonal layers of dimensioned lumber are glued to create panels. To compare the tornado performance of CLT buildings, six archetype residential buildings were each designed using CLT and light-frame wood in accordance to the appropriate US building code provisions and engineering principles. The capacity of each of the structural components was simulated using Monte Carlo Simulation based on the panel spans and connections of the panel boundaries. In addition, the resistance to structure sliding and combined uplift and overturning was simulated using engineering principles based on the load path of a CLT residential structure. Analysis of tornado induced wind loading was performed using recommendations from the 2016 ASCE-7 commentary and applicable literature that attempts to account for the wind-induced pressures caused by tornadoes. Fragility analysis was performed to determine the probability of failure for a given estimated tornado wind-speed. When compared to the wind speeds of the Enhanced Fujita (EF) scale, the CLT residential archetypes showed wind speeds resulting in 10% probability of failure were in the range of EF-4 level events. Factors such as the connection spacing, and roof panel spans had the most significant effect on the simulated performance of the residential archetypes. Thicker panels, more robust connections, or tighter connection spacing could also lead to residential CLT structures that withstand EF-5 level events.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail