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Response of CLT Shear Walls Under Cyclic Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1669
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
MÁLAGA-CHUQUITAYPE, Christian
Skinner, Jonathan
Dowdall, Alan
Kernohan, Juliet
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Cyclic Loads
Full Scale
Stiffness
Strength
Energy Dissipation
Ductility
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3821-3827
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study into the lateral response of cross-laminated-timber (CLT) shear walls under cyclic loads with particular attention to the distribution of forces between the panel-to-floor connections. Six tests on full-scale specimens of different geometric characteristics and connection configurations are presented. The test set-up and wall configurations are described and a detailed account of the experimental results and observations is presented. The paper examines key response features including stiffness, strength, energy dissipation and ductility. Especial attention is given to an accurate measurement of the load sharing between different brackets and its evolution throughout the cyclic action. The results reported offer valuable information on the lateral forcedisplacement response of CLT walls and the applicability of widely employed design assumptions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Thin Topping Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue902
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Skinner, Jonathan
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stiffness
Vibration Response
Topping Thickness
Screws
shear connectors
Static Loads
Cyclic Loads
Short-term
Bending Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A timber-concrete composite (TCC) combines timber and concrete, utilising the complementary properties of each material. The composite is designed in such a way that the timber resists combined tension and bending, whilst the concrete resists combined compression and bending. This construction technique can be used either in new build construction, or in refurbishment, for upgrading existing timber structures. Its use is most prolific in continental Europe, Australasia, and the United States of America but has yet to be widely used in the United Kingdom. To date, the topping upgrades used have been 40mm thick or greater. Depending on the choice of shear connection, this can lead to a four-fold increase in strength and stiffness of the floor. However, in many practical refurbishment situations, such a large increase in stiffness is not required, therefore a thinner topping can suffice. The overarching aim of this study has been to develop a thin (20mm) topping timber-concrete composite upgrade with a view to improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors. Particular emphasis was given to developing an understanding of how the upgrade changes the stiffness and transient vibration response of a timber floor. Initially, an analytical study was carried out to define an appropriate topping thickness. An experimental testing programme was then completed to: characterise suitable shear connectors under static and cyclic loads, assess the benefit of the upgrade to the short-term bending performance of panels and floors, and evaluate the influence of the upgrade on the transient vibration response of a floor. For refurbishing timber floors, a 20mm thick topping sufficiently increased the bending stiffness and improved the transient vibration response. The stiffness of the screw connectors was influenced by the thickness of the topping and the inclination of the screws. During the short-term bending tests, the gamma method provided a non-conservative prediction of composite bending stiffness. In the majority of cases the modal frequencies of the floors tested increased after upgrade, whilst the damping ratios decreased. The upgrade system was shown to be robust as cracking of the topping did not influence the short-term bending performance of panels. Thin topping TCC upgrades offer a practical and effective solution to building practitioners, for improving the serviceability performance of existing timber floors.
Online Access
Free
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Timber-Concrete-Composites Increasing the Use of Timber in Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue615
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Floors
Author
Dias, Alfredo
Skinner, Jonathan
Crews, Keith
Tannert, Thomas
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Germany
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
North America
Europe
Oceania
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Summary
Timber-concrete-composite (TCC) systems have increasingly been used in recent decades. One of the main reasons for this development is related to applications that could not be built with timber alone, but that become possible with a TCC solution. This paper first gives a short overview of the use of TCCs, the relevant regulatory framework, and then presents several case studies of TCC applications. The perspectives and examples are from Europe, North America and Oceania to give a worldwide perspective from regions where TCC systems are being used. The structural systems presented in the case studies include bridges and floors in public buildings. For each project, details of the application are presented and the way each one contributed to extend the use of timber in construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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