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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Hysteretic Behaviour of Metal Connectors for Hybrid (High- and Low-Grade Mixed Species) Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1659
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Mahdavifar, Vahid
Barbosa, André
Sinha, Arijit
Muszynski, Lech
Gupta, Rakesh
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Cyclic Loading
Wall-to-Floor
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3591-3598
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber that are laminated by gluing longitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid panel. Previous studies have shown that the CLT buildings can perform well in seismic loading and are recognized as the essential role of connector performance in structural design, modelling, and analysis of CLT buildings. When CLT is composed of high-grade/high-density layers for the outer lamellas and low-grade/lowdensity for the core of the panels, the CLT panels are herein designated as hybrid CLT panels as opposed to conventional CLT panels that are built using one lumber type for both outer and core lamellas. This paper presents results of a testing program developed to estimate the cyclic performance of CLT connectors applied on hybrid CLT layups. Two connectors are selected, which can be used in wall-to-floor connections. These are readily available in the North American market. Characterization of the performance of connectors is done in two perpendicular directions under a modified CUREE cyclic loading protocol. Depending on the mode of failure, in some cases, testing results indicate that when the nails or screws penetrate the low-grade/low-density core lumber, a statistically significant difference is obtained between hybrid and conventional layups. However, in other cases, due to damage in the face layer or in the connection, force-displacement results for conventional and hybrid CLT layups were not statistically significant.
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Free
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Influence of Specimen Size on Accelerated Weathering of Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2499
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Life Cycle Energy and Environmental Impacts of Cross Laminated Timber Made with Coastal Douglas-fir

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2437
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

A Method to Characterize Biological Degradation of Mass Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2724
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sinha, Arijit
Udele, Kenneth
Cappellazzi, Jed
Morrell, Jeff
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Serviceability
Keywords
Biological Durability
Fungal Degradation
Fungus
Connection Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
Biological durability issues in cross-laminated timber (CLT) have been majorly ignored in North America because of the European origin of the material and careful construction practices in Europe. However, the risks of fungal and insect attacks are increased by the North American climatic conditions and lack of job-site measures to keep the material dry. The methods to evaluate durability in solid timber are inadequate for use in mass timber (MT) for a number of reasons, such as moisture variation and size being critical issues. This study therefore proposes a method, which is suitable to evaluate the strength of MT assemblies that are exposed to fungal degradation. The objective of the study was to explore a controlled method for assessing the effects of wetting and subsequent fungal attack on the behavior of CLT connections. Two different methods were used to create fungal attack on CLT assemblies. Although they were both successful, one was cumbersome, left room for many errors, and was not as efficient as the other. In addition, a standardized method to evaluate and characterize key performance metric for the connections is presented.
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Performance of Steel Energy Dissipators Connected to Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Panels Subjected to Tension and Cyclic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue652
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kramer, Anthonie
Barbosa, André
Sinha, Arijit
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Energy Dissipation
Digital Image Correlation
Strain Behavior
Yield Behavior
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents a new alternative energy dissipation solution to be used with cross-laminated timber (CLT) self-centering walls. CLT is a relatively new building product in North America and could potentially be used for high-rise construction. The development of high-performance seismic design solutions is necessary to encourage innovative structures and the design of these structures to new heights. The objective of this paper is to propose a wall-to-floor connection system that is easy to install and replace (structural fuse) after the occurrence of a large damaging event. The proposed energy dissipators are fabricated following concepts used in developing steel buckling restrained steel braces (BRB), having a milled portion, which is designed to yield and is enclosed within a grouted steel pipe. The connection system is investigated experimentally through a test sequence of displacement-controlled cycles based on a modified version of the test method developed by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) to facilitate development of special precast systems (ACI T1.1-01 Acceptance Criteria for Moment Frames Based on Structural Testing). Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to analyze strain behavior of the milled portion, as well as track movement of the panels during quasi-static uniaxial and cyclic testing. The results show the yield behavior and energy dissipation properties of the connection system. Damage was focused primarily in the energy dissipators, with negligible deformation and damage to the CLT panels and connections.
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Salvaged Lumber for Structural Mass Timber Panels: Manufacturing and Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2470
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Arbelaez, Raphael E.
Schimleck, Laurence
Sinha, Arijit
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bending Moment
Salvaged Lumber
Stiffness
Moment Resistance
Shear Resistance
Wood Failure
Delamination
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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6 records – page 1 of 1.