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Advanced Methods of Encapsulation

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue41
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Codes
Encapsulation
Type X Gypsum Board
National Building Code of Canada
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project aims to support the construction of tall wood buildings by identifying encapsulation methods that provide adequate protection of mass timber elements; the intention is that these methods could potentially be applied to mass timber elements so that the overall assembly could achive a 2 h fire resistance rating.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Endurance of Cross-Laminated Timber Floor and Wall Assemblies for Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1094
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Su, Joseph
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Leroux, Patrice
Lafrance, Pier-Simon
Gratton, Karl
Gibbs, Eric
Berzins, Robert
Organization
National Research Council of Canada
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Tall Wood
Full Scale
Fiberglass Wool
Encapsulated
Type X Gypsum Board
Fire Endurance Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Standard fire endurance tests were performed on a full-scale floor assembly and a full-scale wall assembly constructed with cross-laminated timber (CLT) as the main structural element. The full-scale floor assembly consisted of CLT panels encapsulated with fiberglass wool and a single layer of 15.9 mm thick Type X gypsum board on the exposed side and with two layers of 12.7 mm thick cement board on the unexposed side. The full-scale wall assembly was constructed from CLT panels encapsulated with two layers of 15.9 mm thick Type X gypsum board on both faces. Nine thermocouples were installed on the unexposed face of both assemblies to monitor the temperature rise throughout the test and nine deflection gauges were installed on each assembly to monitor deformations. The superimposed load applied on the floor assembly was 9.4 kN/m² and the load imposed on the wall assembly was 449 kN/m. The fire endurance period of the full-scale floor assembly was 128 minutes and that of the full-scale wall assembly 219 minutes. Both the full-scale floor assembly and the full-scale wall assembly failed structurally afterwards under the applied loading. No hose stream tests were carried out on the fullscale floor and wall assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Performance of Mass-Timber Encapsulation Methods and the Effect of Encapsulation on Char Rate of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue758
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Hasburgh, Laura
Bourne, Keith
Dagenais, Christian
Ranger, Lindsay
Roy-Poirier, Audrey
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Charring Rate
Encapsulation
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria
Summary
Twenty-three (23) cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels were exposed to a standard fire at an intermediate scale. This paper discusses several encapsulation methods used to increase the fire resistance of those panels, with emphasis on encapsulation times and the impact of encapsulation on the charring rate of CLTs. The encapsulation methods used included Type X gypsum board, intumescent coating, rock fibre insulation and spray applied fire-resistant materials (SFRM). The results suggest that encapsulation methods can significantly reduce wood charring rates in addition to delaying the time at which wood elements become involved in fire.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail