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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Connection Wood Brittle Failure in Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1552
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Fasteners
Brittle Failure
Failure Modes
Stiffness-Based Design Approach
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1233-1240
Summary
The introduction of Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) as an engineered timber product has played a significant role in the considerable progress of timber construction in recent years. Extensive research has been conducted in Europe and more recently in Canada to evaluate the fastening capacity of different types of fasteners in CLT. While ductile capacities calculated using the yield limit equations are quite reliable for fastener resistance in connections, however, they do not take into account the possible brittle failure modes of the connection which could be the governing failure mode in multi-fastener joints. Therefore, a stiffness-based design approach which has already been developed by the authors and verified in LVL, glulam and lumber has been adapted to determine the block-tear out resistance of connections in CLT by considering the effect of perpendicular layers. The comparison between the test results on riveted connections conducted at the University of Auckland (UoA) and at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the predictions using the new model and the one developed for uniformly layered timber products show that the proposed model provides higher predictive accuracy and can be used as a design provision to control the brittle failure of wood in CLT connections.
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Ductile Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Platform Structures with Passive Damping

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1728
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hashemi, Ashkan
Loo, Wei Yuen
Masoudnia, Reza
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Low-Rise
Numerical Model
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Quasi-Static
Simulation
Strength
Slip
Platform Buildings
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4730-4737
Summary
Multi-storey platform cross laminated timber (CLT) structures are becoming progressively desirable for engineers and owners. This is because they offer many significant advantages such as speed of fabrication, ease of construction, and excellent strength to weight ratio. With platform construction, stories are fixed together in a way that...
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Ductility and Overstrength of Dowelled LVL and CLT Connections Under Cyclic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1504
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Ottenhaus, Lisa-Mareike
Li, Minghao
Smith, Tobias
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Ductility
Overstrength
Cyclic Loading
Monotonic Loading
Dowels
Ductile Failure
Brittle Failure
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 325-333
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study on ductility and overstrength of dowelled connections. Connection ductility and overstrength derived from monotonic testing are often used in timber connection design in the context of seismic loading, based on the assumption that these properties are similar under monotonic and cyclic loading. This assumption could possibly lead to non-conservative connection design. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify ductility and overstrength for cyclic loading and contrast them with their monotonic performance. For this purpose, monotonic and quasi-static cyclic experimental tests were performed on dowelled LVL and CLT connections. The experimental results were also compared with strength predictions from state-of-the-art analytical models in literature that were verified for ductile and brittle failure under monotonic loading. This work also allowed investigation into a generally applicable overstrength factor for push-pull loaded dowelled connections.
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Dynamic Evaluation of Hybrid Timber-Steel Moment-Frame Structure Using Resilient Slip Friction Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1756
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Frames
Author
Valadbeigi, Armin
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Application
Frames
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Resilient Slip Friction Joint
Damping
Base Shear
Displacement
Acceleration
Self-Centering
Moment-Resisting
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5031-5040
Summary
This study introduces a new resilient slip friction joint for framed hybrid structures. The proposed connection has a self-centring behaviour in addition to damping characteristic. This innovative Resilient Slip Friction (RSF) joint is replaced with the conventional beam to column connections. The RSF joint provides energy dissipation...
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Evaluation of Effective Flange Width in the CLT Composite T-Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1715
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Masoudnia, Reza
Hashemi, Ashkan
Quenneville, Pierre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
T-Beams
Finite Element Model
Effective Flange Width
Shear Lag
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4539-4546
Summary
This paper deals with the behaviour of CLT composite T-beams composed of a Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) acting as panel attached to a Glulam (GL) girder. The paper investigates the effect of the configuration of the CLT panel and GL beam on the effective flange width of the CLT composite T-beams. When the CLT composite T-beams are subjected to positive bending, a part of the CLT panel acts as the flange for the GL girder to resist compression. From shear lag assumption, the compressive stress in the flange varies as the distance from the GL girder web changes. When the spacing between the GL girders increases, the stress in the flange right above the web increases with a higher rate than the rate in the extremities. Despite the large number of studies about design of steel-concrete composite structures, there has not been comprehensive research on timber structures. In the presented study, a finite element (FE) model which is experimentally verified is used to analyse the CLT composite T-beams and numerically obtained effective flange width sizes are presented by tables, bar charts and normal stress distribution figures. Based upon a detailed parametric study, it is concluded that the layer arrangement of the CLT panels and its material properties have a significant influence on the effective flange width of the CLT composite T-beams. Any changes that increase the ratio of the transverse layer’s depth to the longitudinal layer’s depth result in an increase of the effective flange width.
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Failure Modes in CLT Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue495
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Mohammad, Mohammad
Quenneville, Pierre
Salenikovich, Alexander
Zarnani, Pouyan
Munoz, Williams
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Failure Modes
Brittle Behaviour
Canada
New Zealand
Dowels
Bolts
Rivets
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Information on ductile and brittle failure modes is critical for proper design of timber connections in Crosslaminated Timber (CLT). While considerable research has been conducted in Europe and Canada on the ductile performance of connections in CLT, little is known about the brittle behaviour. This paper presents new information from testing programs and analysis performed in Canada and in New Zealand on the brittle performance of dowel-type fasteners in CLT. The testing programs have been designed to trigger brittle failure modes based on minimum end distances and fasteners spacings specified in the Canadian timber design standard. Timber rivets and bolts/dowels are covered under this study. At the time of writing of this abstract, the testing program is advancing and results will be available at the time of paper submission.
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Group Tear-Out in Small-Dowel-Type Timber Connections: Brittle and Mixed Failure Modes of Multinail Joints

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue579
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
dowel-type connections
Load Carrying Capacity
Brittle Failure
Failure Modes
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
In existing wood strength prediction models for parallel to grain failure in timber connections using dowel-type fasteners, different methods consider the minimum, maximum, or summation of the tensile and shear capacities of the failed wood block planes. It is postulated that these methods are not appropriate since the stiffness of the adjacent wood loading the tensile and shear planes differs, and this leads to uneven load distribution among the resisting planes. A closed-form analytical method to determine the load-carrying capacity of wood under parallel-to-grain loading in small-dowel-type connections in timber products is thus proposed. For the wood strength, the stiffness of the adjacent loading volumes and strength of the failure planes subjected to nonuniform shear and tension stresses are considered. The effective wood thickness for the brittle failure mode is derived and related to the elastic deformation of the fastener. A mixed failure mode is also defined (a mixture of brittle and ductile) and depends on the governing ductile failure mode of the fastener. To help the designer, an algorithm is presented that allows the designer to calculate the resistances associated with predictions of the different possible brittle, ductile, and mixed failure modes. The proposed stiffness-based model has already been verified in brittle and mixed failure modes of timber rivet connections. In the research reported in this paper, an extended application is proposed for other small-dowel-type fasteners such as nails and screws. Results of nailed joint tests on laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and the test data available from the literature on glulam confirm the validity of this new method, and show that it can be used as a design provision for wood load-carrying capacity prediction of small-dowel-type timber connections.
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Japan Kobe Earthquake Shake Table Simulation – Earthquake Performance of Multi-storey Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1849
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Quenneville, Pierre
Morris, Hugh
Publisher
New Zealand Timber Design Society
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Earthquake
Shake Table Test
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
New Zealand Timber Design Journal
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mode Cross-Over and Ductility of Dowelled LVL and CLT Connections under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1228
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Ottenhaus, Lisa-Mareike
Li, Minghao
Smith, Tobias
Quenneville, Pierre
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Steel Dowels
Steel Plates
Ductility
Brittle
Monotonic Loading
Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents an experimental study on dowelled connections in Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) and Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) using 20 mm mild steel dowels and internal steel plates. Connections designed to fail in brittle row shear and group tear-out were tested under monotonic loading to assess the validity of analytical models from literature and code provisions. Connections designed to provide non-linearity before failure and thus produce ductility were tested under both monotonic and cyclic loading to study the influence of cyclic loading on ductility and the possibility of mode cross-over. It was found that cross layers in CLT improve ductility. Furthermore, mode cross-over from ductile response to brittle failure was observed in both CLT and LVL connections. Nevertheless, a good amount of ductility was achieved in all layouts (except the LVL connections designed for group tear-out failure) before cross-over to brittle failure occurred.
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New Design Approach for Controlling Brittle Failure Modes of Small-Dowel-Type Connections in Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue155
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zarnani, Pouyan
Quenneville, Pierre
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Brittle Failure Mode
Fasteners
Stiffness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
The introduction of Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) as an engineered timber product has played a significant role in considerable progress of timber construction in recent years. Extensive research has been conducted in Europe and more recently in Canada to evaluate the fastening capacity of different types of fasteners in CLT. While ductile capacities calculated using the yield limit equations are quite reliable for fastener resistance in connections, however, they do not take into account the possible brittle failure mode of the connection which could be the governing failure mode in multi-fastener joints. Therefore, a stiffness-based design approach which has already been developed by the authors and verified in LVL, glulam and lumber has been adapted to determine the block-tear out resistance of connections in CLT by considering the effect of perpendicular layers. The comparison between the test results on riveted connections conducted at the University of Auckland (UoA) and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the predictions using the new model and the one developed for uniformly layered timber products show that the proposed model provides higher predictive accuracy and can be used as a design provision to control the brittle failure of wood in CLT connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.