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Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Mass Timber and Concrete Residential Buildings: A Case Study in China

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2884
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Chen, Cindy
Pierobon, Francesca
Jones, Susan
Maples, Ian
Gong, Yingchun
Ganguly, Indroneil
Organization
Portland State University
University of Washington
Editor
Caggiano, Antonio
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2022
Country of Publication
United States
China
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Mass Timber
Embodied Carbon
Climate Change
Built Environment
Life Cycle Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
As the population continues to grow in China’s urban settings, the building sector contributes to increasing levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Concrete and steel are the two most common construction materials used in China and account for 60% of the carbon emissions among all building components. Mass timber is recognized as an alternative building material to concrete and steel, characterized by better environmental performance and unique structural features. Nonetheless, research associated with mass timber buildings is still lacking in China. Quantifying the emission mitigation potentials of using mass timber in new buildings can help accelerate associated policy development and provide valuable references for developing more sustainable constructions in China. This study used a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach to compare the environmental impacts of a baseline concrete building and a functionally equivalent timber building that uses cross-laminated timber as the primary material. A cradle-to-gate LCA model was developed based on onsite interviews and surveys collected in China, existing publications, and geography-specific life cycle inventory data. The results show that the timber building achieved a 25% reduction in global warming potential compared to its concrete counterpart. The environmental performance of timber buildings can be further improved through local sourcing, enhanced logistics, and manufacturing optimizations.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Comparative LCAs of Conventional and Mass Timber Buildings in Regions with Potential for Mass Timber Penetration

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2885
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Puettmann, Maureen
Pierobon, Francesca
Ganguly, Indroneil
Gu, Hongmei
Chen, Cindy
Liang, Shaobo
Jones, Susan
Maples, Ian
Wishnie, Mark
Organization
University of Washington
Forest Products Laboratory
Portland State University
Editor
Borghi, Adriana Del
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Mass Timber
Life-Cycle Assessment
Embodied Carbon
Embodied Energy
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Manufacturing of building materials and construction of buildings make up 11% of the global greenhouse gas emission by sector. Mass timber construction has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by moving wood into buildings with designs that have traditionally been dominated by steel and concrete. The environmental impacts of mass timber buildings were compared against those of functionally equivalent conventional buildings. Three pairs of buildings were designed for the Pacific Northwest, Northeast and Southeast regions in the United States to conform to mass timber building types with 8, 12, or 18 stories. Conventional buildings constructed with concrete and steel were designed for comparisons with the mass timber buildings. Over all regions and building heights, the mass timber buildings exhibited a reduction in the embodied carbon varying between 22% and 50% compared to the concrete buildings. Embodied carbon per unit of area increased with building height as the quantity of concrete, metals, and other nonrenewable materials increased. Total embodied energy to produce, transport, and construct A1–A5 materials was higher in all mass timber buildings compared to equivalent concrete. Further research is needed to predict the long-term carbon emissions and carbon mitigation potential of mass timber buildings to conventional building materials.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Mass Timber Building Life Cycle Assessment Methodology for the U.S. Regional Case Studies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2887
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gu, Hongmei
Liang, Shaobo
Pierobon, Francesca
Puettmann, Maureen
Ganguly, Indroneil
Chen, Cindy
Pasternack, Rachel
Wishnie, Mark
Jones, Susan
Maples, Ian
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
University of Washington
Population Research Center
Editor
Jasinskas, Algirdas
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Mass Timber
Whole-building LCA Methodology
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
The building industry currently consumes over a third of energy produced and emits 39% of greenhouse gases globally produced by human activities. The manufacturing of building materials and the construction of buildings make up 11% of those emissions within the sector. Whole-building life-cycle assessment is a holistic and scientific tool to assess multiple environmental impacts with internationally accepted inventory databases. A comparison of the building life-cycle assessment results would help to select materials and designs to reduce total environmental impacts at the early planning stage for architects and developers, and to revise the building code to improve environmental performance. The Nature Conservancy convened a group of researchers and policymakers from governments and non-profit organizations with expertise across wood product life-cycle assessment, forest carbon, and forest products market analysis to address emissions and energy consumption associated with mass timber building solutions. The study disclosed a series of detailed, comparative life-cycle assessments of pairs of buildings using both mass timber and conventional materials. The methodologies used in this study are clearly laid out in this paper for transparency and accountability. A plethora of data exists on the favorable environmental performance of wood as a building material and energy source, and many opportunities appear for research to improve on current practices.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Produced in Western Washington: The Role of Logistics and Wood Species Mix

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2009
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Chen, Cindy
Pierobon, Francesca
Ganguly, Indroneil
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Cradle-to-Gate
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
ISSN
2071-1050
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Life Cycle Assessment of Katerra's Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) and Catalyst Building: Final Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2545
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Simonen, Kate
Huang, Monica
Ganguly, Indroneil
Pierobon, Francesca
Chen, Cindy
Organization
Carbon Leadership Forum
Center for International Trade in Forest Products
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
LCA
Mid-Rise
Environmental Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Katerra has developed its own cross-laminated timber (CLT) manufacturing facility in Spokane Valley, Washington. This 25,100 m2 (270,000 ft2 ) factory is the largest CLT manufacturing facility in the world, and is capable of producing approximately 187,000 m3 of CLT per year. Katerra has also established a vertically integrated supply chain to provide the wood for the CLT factory. Production started in summer of 2019. Katerra commissioned the Carbon Leadership Forum (CLF) and Center for International Trade in Forest Products (CINTRAFOR) at the University of Washington to analyze the environmental impacts of its CLT as well as the Catalyst Building in Spokane, Washington. The Catalyst is a 15,690 m2 (168,800 ft2), five-story office building that makes extensive use of CLT as a structural and design element. Jointly developed by Avista and McKinstry, Katerra largely designed and constructed the building, and used CLT produced by Katerra’s new factory. Performing a life cycle assessment (LCA) on Katerra’s CLT will allow Katerra to explore opportunities for environmental impact reduction along their supply chain and improve their CLT production efficiency. Performing an LCA on the Catalyst Building will enable Katerra to better understand life cycle environmental impacts of mass timber buildings and identify opportunities to optimize environmental performance of mid-rise CLT structures. The goal, scope, methodology, and results of this analysis are detailed in this report.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Massive Wood Material for Sustainable Building Design: the Massiv–Holz–Mauer Wall System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2101
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

6 records – page 1 of 1.