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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Behavior of Cross-Laminated Timber Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-Tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1422
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Cross-Laminated Timber Engineering: Improvement and Application

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1366
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Cyclic Performance of Connections used in Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1367
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Mass Timber Post-Tensioned Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2791
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Shear Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Serviceability
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Self-Centering
Shear Walls
Anchoring
Creep
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mariapaola Riggio at Oregon State University
Summary
Earthquake engineers are focusing on performance-based design solutions that minimize damage, downtime, and dollars spent on repairs by designing buildings that have no residual drift or “leaning” after an event. The development of timber post-tensioned (PT), self-centering rocking shear walls addresses this high-performance demand. The system works by inserting unbonded steel rods or tendons into timber elements that are prestressed to provide a compressive force on the timber, which will pull the structure back into place after a strong horizontal action. But, because these systems are less than fifteen years old with just four real-world applications, little information is known regarding best practices and optimal methods for engineering design, construction and/or tensioning procedures, and long-term maintenance considerations. This project intends to contribute knowledge by testing both cross-laminated timber (CLT) and mass plywood panel (MPP) walls through testing of anchorage detailing, investigating tensioning procedures for construction, determining the contributions of creep on prestress loss over time, and comparing all laboratory test data to monitoring data from three of the four buildings in which this technology has been implemented, one of which is George W. Peavy Hall at Oregon State University. This will be accomplished by testing small- and full-scale specimens in the A.A. “Red” Emmerson Advanced Wood Products Laboratory, and small-scale specimens in an environmental chamber.
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Developing an Application for Mass Plywood Panels in Seismic and Energy Wall Retrofit

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2568
Topic
Energy Performance
Seismic
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Building Envelope
Organization
University of Oregon
Oregon State University
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Walls
Building Envelope
Topic
Energy Performance
Seismic
Keywords
Retrofit
Assembly
Prefabrication
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mark Fretz at the University of Oregon
Summary
University of Oregon and Oregon State University are collaborating through TallWood Design Institute (TDI) to upgrade aging, energy inefficient and seismically unprepared multifamily housing by developing a mass plywood (MPP) retrofit panel assembly that employs digital workflows and small diameter logs (down to 5") to create an economically viable energy/seismic retrofit model for the West Coast and beyond. The project has broad potential to support forested federal land management agencies and private forestry by proving a new market for small diameter logs.
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Effective Bonding Parameters for Hybrid Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1368
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors

End-of-life Disassembly and Re-use of Mass Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2796
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Deconstructable Connections
End of Life
Disassembly
Reuse
Mass Timber
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Lech Muszynski at Oregon State University
Summary
The aim of this project is to remove this vulnerability by thoughtful conceptualization of basic strategies for optimizing the design of mass timber buildings for successful post-use material recovery/reuse and end-of-life climate benefit. Research questions will include: 1. Is demolition of decommissioned mass timber buildings a viable end-of-life option at all? 2. Can deconstruction be conducted by following construction steps in reverse order? 3.What may be the extent of damage inflicted to the connection nests, connected edges and surfaces of MTP elements during a deconstruction? 4.Can original connection nests be safely reused in structures re-using deconstructed MTP elements? 5.What is the impact of techniques and technologies selected at the design, production, and construction stages on the EOL options and carbon cost of deconstruction, 6. What is the carbon impact of deconstruction on reuse or recycling of MTP elements? 7. Do the existing deconstruction companies in the Pacific northwest have capacity to process mass timber panels that could not be reused? 8. What is the carbon costs of transportation and repurposing/recycling of MTP elements for non-structural uses?
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Establishing New Markets for CLT - Lessons Learned

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1427
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Expanding Mass Timber and CLT Markets for High Termite Risk Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2790
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Termites
Moisture
Treated Wood
Field Testing
Hawaii
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Gerald Presley, Oregon State University, and Scott Noble, Kaiser+Path
Summary
The primary goal of this project is to enhance the durability of mass timber assemblies in high-moisture, high-termite risk regions. Only a few U.S. jurisdictions allow mass timber use by code adoption. Hawaii requires that all structural wood be treated to resist insects. Current topical or pressure treatments are allowed, but it is unclear how these treatments will perform in mass timber elements. Assembled cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels are too large to fit in pressure vessels. We will test the performance of individually treated wood members (lamella), assembled into CLT panels for compliance to structural requirements as well as resistance to termite attack in field trials. The resulting data will identify the most effective treatment options to protect CLT and other mass timber assemblies for use in Hawaii and similar regions with high termite exposure. The research implications will contribute to educating architects, engineers, builders and developers on modern timber construction in new regions.
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28 records – page 1 of 3.