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A Comparative Analysis of Three Methods Used for Calculating Deflections for Multi-Storey Wood Shearwalls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1719
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deformation
Drifts
Stiffness
Building Period
Base Shear
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4597-4604
Summary
With the introduction of 5 and 6-storey wood structures into the National Building Code of Canada 2015, it is important that guidance be provided to engineers to ensure that a reasonable design approach can be sought in the design of taller wood structures. The purpose of this technical paper is to compare various methods for calculating building deformations for wood-platform framed structures, which range from simply assuming each storey acts independent of the adjacent storey to a purely mechanics-based approach considering all 6 storeys acting as a continuous wall in order to compare the differences in drifts, stiffness, building period, base shear, and force distribution based on relative stiffness. General guidance is provided on which method to use.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Design Example: Design of Stacked Multi-Storey Wood Shear Walls Using a Mechanics Based Approach

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue739
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Newfield, Grant
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Codes
National Building Code of Canada
Lateral Seismic Loads
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Figure 1 shows a floor plan and elevation along with the preliminary shear wall locations for a sixstorey wood-frame building. It is assumed some preliminary calculations have been provided to determine the approximate length of wall required to resist the lateral seismic loads. If the preliminary design could not meet the drift limit requirement using the base shear obtained based on the actual period, the shear walls should be re-designed until the drift limit requirement is satisfied.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Linear Dynamic Analysis for Wood-Based Shear Walls and Podium Structures: Part 1: Developing Input Parameters for Linear Dynamic Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue740
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Ni, Chun
Newfield, Grant
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Deflection
Linear Dynamic Analysis
National Building Code of Canada
Stiffness
Floor Drifts
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Utilizing Linear Dynamic Analysis (LDA) for designing steel and concrete structures has been common practice over the last 25 years. Once preliminary member sizes have been determined for either steel or concrete, building a model for LDA is generally easy as the member sizes and appropriate stiffness can be easily input into any analysis program. However, performing an LDA for a conventional wood-frame structure has been, until recently, essentially non-existent in practice. The biggest challenge is that the stiffness properties required to perform an LDA for a wood-based system are not as easily determined as they are for concrete or steel structures. This is mostly due to the complexities associated with determining the initial parameters required to perform the analysis. With the height limit for combustible construction limited to four stories under the National Building Code of Canada, it was uncommon for designers to perform detailed analysis to determine the stiffness of shear walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts. It was only in rare situations where one may have opted to check building deflections. With the recent change in allowable building heights for combustible buildings from four to six storeys under an amendment to the 2006 BC Building Code, it has become even more important that designers consider more sophisticated methods for the analysis and design of wood-based shear walls. As height limits increase, engineers should also be more concerned with the assumptions made in determining the relative stiffness of walls, distribution of forces, deflections, and inter-storey drifts to ensure that a building is properly detailed to meet the minimum Code objectives. Although the use of LDA has not been common practice, the more rigorous analysis, as demonstrated in the APEGBC bulletin on 5- and 6-storey wood-frame residential building projects (APEGBC 2011), could be considered the next step which allows one to perform an LDA. This fact sheet provides a method to assist designers who may want to consider an LDA for analyzing wood-frame structures. It is important to note that while LDA may provide useful information as well as streamline the design of wood-frame structures, it most often will not be necessary.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

A Mechanics Based Approach for Determining Deflections of Stacked Multi-Storey Wood Based Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue738
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Newfield, Grant
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Deflection
Flexural Deformations
Shear
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The 2009 edition of CSA Standard O86, Engineering Design in Wood (CSA 2009), provides an equation for determining the deflection of shear walls. It is important to note that this equation only works for a single-storey shear wall with load applied at the top of the wall. While the equation captures the shear and flexural deformations of the shear wall, it does not account for moment at the top of the wall and the cumulative effect due to rotation at the bottom of the wall, which would be expected in a multi-storey structure. In this fact sheet, a mechanics-based method for calculating deflection of a multi-storey wood-based shear wall is presented.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail