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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Behaviour of Cross-laminated Timber Wall Systems Under Monotonic Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2404
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
McPolin, Daniel
Hughes, C.
McGetrick, P.
McCrum, D.
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Timber Buildings
Lateral Load
Earthquake
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Integrity and Maintenance
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Development of Novel Post-Tensioned Glulam Timber Composites

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue676
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
McConnell, Emma
McPolin, Daniel
Taylor, Su
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Post-Tension
Four Point Bending Test
Ductile
Load Carrying Capacity
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Timber as a primary structural material has been forced to continually evolve to keep abreast with the changing demands of the construction industry. This paper presents further research undertaken by Queen’s University Belfast to evaluate the advantages provided by the post-tensioning of timber members using novel basalt fibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) rods. Using the high strength, low density, highly durable BFRP tendons experimental investigations utilising the four-point bending method were conducted and monitored. From the experimentation it was found that there was an increase in load carrying capacity, a more favourable ductile failure mode and a further benefit of less net deflection due to the precamber induced by the post-tensioning prior to load application.
Online Access
Free
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Effects of the Thickness of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels Made from Irish Sitka Spruce on Mechanical Performance in Bending and Shear

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue990
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sikora, Karol
McPolin, Daniel
Harte, Annette
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Sitka Spruce
Thickness
Bending Stiffness
Rolling Shear Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
An investigation was carried out on CLT panels made from Sitka spruce in order to establish the effect of the thickness of CLT panels on the bending stiffness and strength and the rolling shear. Bending and shear tests on 3-layer and 5-layer panels were performed with loading in the out-of-plane and in-plane directions. ‘Global’ stiffness measurements were found to correlate well with theoretical values. Based on the results, there was a general tendency that both the bending strength and rolling shear decreased with panel thickness. Mean values for rolling shear ranged from 1.0 N/mm2 to 2.0 N/mm2.
Online Access
Free
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Post-Tensioning of Glulam Timber with Steel Tendons

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue120
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
McConnell, Emma
McPolin, Daniel
Taylor, Su
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Long-term
Post-Tensioning
Reinforcement
Steel
Stiffness
Strength
Four Point Bending Test
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Construction and Building Materials
Summary
This paper describes a series of four-point bending tests that were conducted, under service loads and to failure, on unreinforced, reinforced and post-tensioned glulam timber beams, where the reinforcing tendon used was 12mm diameter toughened steel bar. The research was designed to evaluate the benefits offered by including an active reinforcement in contrast to the passive reinforcement typically used within timber strengthening works, in addition to establishing the effect that bonding the reinforcing tendon has on the materials performance. The laboratory investigations established that the flexural strength and stiffness increased for both the reinforced and post-tensioned timbers compared to the unreinforced beams. The flexural strength of the reinforced timber increased by 29.4%, while the stiffness increased by 28.1%. Timber that was post-tensioned with an unbonded steel tendon showed a flexural strength increase of 17.6% and an increase in stiffness of 8.1%. Post-tensioned beams with a bonded steel tendon showed increases in flexural strength and stiffness of 40.1% and 30% respectively.
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Free
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Shear Strength and Durability Testing of Adhesive Bonds in Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue535
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sikora, Karol
McPolin, Daniel
Harte, Annette
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Phenol-Resorcinol Formaldehyde
Polyurethane
Adhesives
Block Shear Tests
Shear Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
The Journal of Adhesion
Summary
This paper addresses the quality of the interface- and edge-bonded joints in layers of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels. The shear performance was studied to assess the suitability of two different adhesives, polyurethane (PUR) and phenol–resorcinol–formaldehyde (PRF), and to determine the optimum clamping pressure. Since there is no established testing procedure to determine the shear strength of the surface bonds between layers in a CLT panel, block shear tests of specimens in two different configurations were carried out, and further shear tests of edge-bonded specimen in two configurations were performed. Delamination tests were performed on samples which were subjected to accelerated aging to assess the durability of bonds in severe environmental conditions. Both tested adhesives produced boards with shear strength values within the edge-bonding requirements of prEN 16351 for all manufacturing pressures. While the PUR specimens had higher shear strength values, the PRF specimens demonstrated superior durability characteristics in the delamination tests. It seems that the test protocol introduced in this study for crosslam-bonded specimens, cut from a CLT panel, and placed in the shearing tool horizontally, accurately reflects the shearing strength of glue lines in CLT
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Viscoelastic Creep in Reinforced Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1629
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
O’Ceallaigh, Conan
Sikora, Karol
McPolin, Daniel
Harte, Annette
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Keywords
Long-term
Loading
Climate
Spruce
Ireland
Reinforcement
BFRP
Stiffness
Flexural Testing
Creep
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2823-2831
Summary
The reinforcement of timber elements using fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) rods or plates is widely accepted as an effective method of increasing the strength and stiffness of members. The short-term behaviour of these reinforced members is relatively well understood, however, the long-term or creep behaviour of such members has received less attention. The objectives of the present work are to determine the long-term performance of reinforced timber beams under sustained loading and constant climate conditions. Timber is a viscoelastic material so its deformation response is a combination of both elastic and viscous components. This viscous creep component is defined as a deformation with time at constant stress and at constant environmental conditions. Sitka spruce is the most widely grown specie in Ireland and is the focus of this study. Glued Laminated (Glulam) beams were manufactured from Sitka spruce and a selected portion of them were reinforced with basalt-fibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) rods. The short-term flexural testing of these beams in their unreinforced and reinforced state demonstrated a significant increase in stiffness with a modest percentage reinforcement ratio. The long-term flexural testing required the design of a creep test frame to implement a constant stress of 8 MPa on the compression face of an equal proportion of unreinforced and reinforced beams. The long-term strain and deflection results for the first 52 weeks of testing are presented. The reinforcement was found to have an insignificant impact on the creep deflection but the maximum tensile creep strain was significantly reduced.
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Free
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6 records – page 1 of 1.