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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Compressive Strength of Cross-Laminated Timber Panel

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue280
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Lee, Junjae
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Compression Strength
Mid-Rise
Vertical Bearing Load
Monte Carlo
Conference
International Convention of Society of Wood Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 23-27, 2014, Zvolen, Slovakia, p.761-768
Summary
The mission of the Hardwood Scanning Center at Purdue University is to increase the global competitiveness of the United States hardwood industry and to conserve the hardwood resource by development of manufacturing technologies which will enable hardwood industry to “see inside a tree” and use this information to make better processing decisions. The Hardwood Scanning Center partnered with Microtek, GmbH of Italy in the development of an industrial grade log CT scanner. World’s first three industrial CT log scanners have been installed in last 12 months in mills around the world and we will briefly discuss their application. The Hardwood Scanning Center also developed visualization and optimization software for the hardwood veneer and sawmill operations. This presentation will provide an overview of state-of-the-art in CT scanning of logs.
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End Distance of Single-Shear Screw Connection in Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2019
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Kim, Kwang-Mo
Lee, Jun-Jae
Lee, Hyeon-Jeong
Lee, Sang-Joon
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Kim, Gwang-Chul
Publisher
KoreaScience
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Keywords
End Distance
Screws
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the Korean Wood Science and Technology
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a relatively new engineered wood for timber construction. It is a great shear wall material. It was known that the shear performance of the CLT wall depends on the performance of connections. In connection, nail or screw has to be installed with a certain distance from the end of the timber. Current building code specifies the distance on the name of end distance. The end distance was decided as a minimum distance not to make splitting or tearing out in lumber or glued laminated timber. As a relatively new engineered wood, the end distance of CLT connection need to be identified because CLT is cross-wisely glued lumber products like plywood. Different from glued laminated timber or lumber, cross layer of CLT may prevent wood from splitting or tearing-out. As a result, the end distance of CLT was expected to be reduced than glued laminated timber. The shorter end distance may let more versatile connector design possible. In this study, prior to developing novel connection for CLT, the end distance of CLT connection was experimentally investigated to identify the end distance limitation. The experiments showed that the end distance can be reduced from 7D to 6D, in case of the tested CLT combination and screw in this study.
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Prediction of Compressive Strength of Cross-Laminated Timber Panel

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue517
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Lee, Jun-Jae
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Lamina
Monte Carlo
Compressive Strength
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
Compressive strength of cross-laminated timber (CLT) is one of the important mechanical properties which should be considered especially in design of mid-rise CLT building because it works to resist a vertical bearing load from the upper storeys. The CLT panel can be manufactured in various combinations of the grade and dimension of lamina. This leads to the fact that an experimental approach to evaluate the strength of CLT would be expensive and time-demanding. In this paper, lamina property-based models for predicting the compressive strength of CLT panel was studied. A Monte Carlo simulation was applied for the model prediction. A set of experimental compression tests on CLT panel (short column) was conducted to validate the model and it shows good results. Using this model, the influence of the lamina’s width on the CLT compressive strength was investigated. It reveals that the CLT compressive strength increases with the increase in the number of lamina. It was thought that repetitive member effect (or dispersion effect) is applicable for the CLT panel, which was explained by the decrease of the variation in strength. This dependency of the number of lamina needs further study in development of reference design values, CLT wall design and CLT manufacturing.
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Prediction of Shear Performance on Cross Laminated Timber Wall with Wall to Wall Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1781
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Kim, Chul-Ki
Pang, Sung-Jun
Lee, Hyeon-Jeong
Jang, Sung-Il
Park, Moon-Jae
Lee, Jun-Jae
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Performance
Failure Mode
Displacement
Peak Load
Model
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5503-5510
Summary
A cross-laminated timber (CLT) wall plays a role of resisting shear stress induced by lateral forces as well as resisting vertical load. Due to the press size, CLT panels have a limitation in its size. To minimize the initial investment, some glulam manufactures wanted to make a shear wall element with small-size CLT panels and panel-to-panel...
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Shear Behavior of Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Consisting of Small Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1411
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Kim, Chul-Ki
Pang, Sung-Jun
Lee, Sang-Joon
Lee, Jun-Jae
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Kinematic Model
Peak Load
Displacement
Panel-to-Panel
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
A cross-laminated timber (CLT) wall plays the role of resisting shear stress induced by lateral forces as well as vertical load. Due to the press size, CLT panels have a limitation in size. To minimize the initial investment, some glulam manufactures wanted to make a shear wall element with small-size CLT panels and panel-to-panel connections and wanted to know whether the shear wall would have equivalent shear performance with the wall made of a single CLT panel. In this study, this was investigated by experiments and kinematic model analysis. Two shear walls made of small CLT panels were tested. The model showed a good agreement with test results in the envelope curve. Even though the shear walls were made of small panels, the global peak load did not decrease significantly compared with the wall made of a single CLT panel, but the global displacement showed a large increase. From this analysis, it was concluded that the shear wall can be designed with small CLT panels, but displacement should be designed carefully.
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Stochastic Model for Predicting the Bending Strength of Glued-Laminated Timber Based on the Knot Area Ratio and Localized MOE in Lamina

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1379
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Pang, Sung-Jun
Oh, Jung-Kwon
Hong, Jung-Pyo
Lee, Sang-Joon
Lee, Jun-Jae
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stochastic Model
Bending Strength
Modulus of Elasticity
Tensile Strength
Knot Area Ratios
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
The aim of this study was to develop a stochastic model for predicting the bending strength distribution of glued-laminated timber (GLT). The developed model required the localized modulus of elasticity (MOE) and tensile strengths of laminae as input properties. The tensile strength was estimated using a regression model based on the localized MOEs and knot area ratios (KAR) which were experimentally measured for lamina grades samples. The localized MOE was obtained using a machine stress-rated grader, and the localized KAR was determined using an image-processing system. The bending strength distributions in four types of GLTs were simulated using the developed GLT beam model; these four types included: (1) GLT beams without finger joints; (2) GLT beams with finger joints; (3) GLT beams with different lamina sizes; and (4) GLT beams with different combinations of lamina grades. The simulated bending strength distributions were compared with actual test data of 2.4 and 4.8 m-long GLTs. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests showed that all of the simulated bending strength distributions agreed well with the test data. Especially, good agreement was shown in the fifth percentile point estimate of bending strength with the difference of approximately 1%.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.