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Illustrated Guide R30+ Effective Vaulted & Flat Roofs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2348
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Author
Marleau, Christopher
Higgins, James
Ricketts, Lorne
Roppel, Patrick
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Guide
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Vaulted Roofs
Water-Shedding Roofs
Flat Waterproof Membrane Roofs
Thermal Performance
Moisture Management
Air Leakage
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Illustrated Guide consolidates information on vaulted water-shedding roofs and flat waterproof membrane roofs that are capable of meeting R-30 or greater effective thermal performance when used on low- and mid-rise wood-frame buildings. The guide is intended to be an industry, utility, and government resource with respect to meeting this thermal performance level, while not compromising other aspects of building enclosure performance, including moisture management, air leakage, and durability.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Moisture Uptake Testing for CLT Floor Panels in a Tall Wood Building in Vancouver

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2343
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Lepage, Robert
Higgins, James
Finch, Graham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Water Resistance
Coatings
Hygrothermal Models
Moisture Content
Sensors
Biodegradation
Funghi
Language
English
Conference
Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) and mass timber construction is a promising structural technology that harnesses the advantageous structural properties of wood combined with renewability and carbon sequestering capacities not readily found in other major structural materials. However, as an organic material, mass timber is susceptible to biodeterioration, and when considered in conjunction with increased use of engineered wood materials, particularly in more extreme environments and exposures, it requires careful assessments to ensure long-term performance. A promising approach towards reducing construction moisture in CLT and other mass timber assemblies is to protect the surfaces with a water-resistant coating. To assess this approach, a calibrated hygrothermal model was developed with small and large scale CLT samples, instrumented with moisture content sensors at different depths, and treated with different types of water resistant coatings exposed to the Vancouver climate. The models were further validated with additional moisture content sensors installed in a mock-up floor structure of an actual CLT building under construction. Biodeterioration studies assessing fungal colonization were undertaken using the modified VTT growth method and a Dose-Response model for decay potential. The research indicates that CLT and mass timber is susceptible to dangerously high moisture contents, particularly when exposed to liquid water in horizontal applications. However, a non-porous, vapour impermeable coating, when applied on dry CLT, appears to significantly reduce the moisture load and effectively eliminate the risk of biodeterioration. This work strongly suggests that future use of CLT consider applications of a protective water-resistant coating at the manufacturing plant to resist construction moisture. The fungal study also highlights the need for a limit state design for biodeterioration to countenance variance between predicted and observed conditions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Structural Performance Monitoring Technology and Data Visualization Tools and Techniques – Featured Case Study: UBC Tallwood House

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2342
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Author
Mustapha, Gamal
Khondoker, Khaleed
Higgins, James
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Moisture Performance
Vertical Movement
Prefabrication
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Horizons in Green Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wood structures such as the Wood Innovation and Design Center in Prince George and the UBC Tallwood House, an 18 storey, 53-meter-tall mass timber hybrid building are examples of new and innovative wood structures that encompass new construction techniques, unique materials and novel building practices. Empirical data on the condition of critical components and access to the real-time status of the structure during construction gives Architects, Engineers and Contractors critical information to make informed decisions to either validate or improve the construction plan. Data recorded during the life of the building helps validate the design decisions and proves the viability and feasibility of the design. Methods and practices used to monitor both the moisture performance of prefabricated cross laminate timber (CLT) as well as the vertical movement sensing of the building during and after construction are explored in this paper. Moisture content of the CLT panels has been recorded from manufacturing and prefabrication to storage, through transport and during installation and will continue throughout the service life of the building. The calculated and expected displacement of the wood columns is scheduled to take several years as the structure settles, however a first-year analysis and extrapolation of the data was conducted. Monitoring during transport, storage, and construction proved that CLT panels were resilient to moisture issues while in the manufacturers storage, but prone to direct exposure to moisture-related problems regardless of the precautions taken on site. Despite construction during typical Pacific Northwest rain, informed decisions were made to ensure the panel moisture content could decrease to acceptable ranges before continuing to secondary construction phases. The moisture trends observed in the building were proportional to the control samples as both were subjected to similar environmental conditions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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