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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Long-term Performance of Timber Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2081
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Mpidi Bita, Hercend
Shahnewaz, Md
Mehdi Ebadi, Mohammad
Gerber, Adam
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Environmental Conditions
Deflection
Long-term Loading
Bending Stiffness
Load Carrying Capacity
Vibration Performance
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-concrete-composite (TCC) floors, composed of timber and concrete layers connected by a shear connector are a successful example of hybrid structural components and are commonly used in practical applications.The connection of the two components is usually achieved with mechanical fasteners where relative slip cannot be prevented and the connection cannot be considered rigid. The growing availability of panel-type engineered wood products (EWPs) offers versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. Preceding research determined the properties for a range of TCC connector systems in several EWPs using full-scale short-term bending tests. In the research presented herein, nine TCC floor segments (one specimens of each previously investigated configuration) were exposed to serviceability loads for approximately 2.5 years. During this time, the environmental conditions and the deflections of each floor were monitored. After having been long-term loaded, the floor segments were tested to failure. The results show an increase of deflection over time but neither bending stiffness,load-carrying capacity nor vibration performance were impacted by the long-term loading. This research provides input data to develop design guidance for TCC floors.
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Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Floors Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1618
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Small Scale
Shear Tests
Elastic Stiffness
Quasi-Static
Loading
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 2397-2406
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. A large number of T-beam configurations currently exist; however, the growing availability of panel-type engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of TCC systems in several EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for different TCC configurations based on small-scale shear tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that calculations according to the -method can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy. Floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure occurred at loads that were between four and ten times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
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Seismic Performance of Post-Tensioned Moment-Resisting Portal Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1973
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Popovski, Marjan
Gerber, Adam
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Moment-Resisting
Seismic Performance
Cyclic Tests
Portal Frames
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Glulam-based post-tensioned moment-resisting portal frames were developed by a producer from British Columbia in collaboration with ASPECT Structural Engineers. These modular frames, manufactured from appearance-grade glulam, can be viable solutions for substitution of steel moment frames in predominantly wood-framed buildings. This paper presents an experimental study on the structural performance of post-tensioned glulam moment-resisting portal frames under in-plane lateral loads. A total of twelve frame specimens in four different configurations were tested under static or reversed cyclic loads. The test results show that the behaviour of post-tensioned moment-resisting portal frames was relatively similar under static and cyclic loading, in which non-linear elastic behaviour was observed due to the post-tensioning. The peak lateral loads applied to the tested post-tensioned frames was in a range of 34.1 kN to 61.7 kN and the lateral stiffness ranged from 0.53 kN/mm to 2.65 kN/mm, respectively. Depending of the frame configuration, typical failure modes identified during the testing consisted of a combination of either (i) compression perpendicular to grain failure at the columns on the side in contact with the beam; or (ii) compression perpendicular to grain failure at the beam on the side in contact with the columns; and (iii) screw failure in the column-to-base joints (if present). The tests give a valuable insight into the seismic performance of post-tensioned glulam moment-resisting portal frames.
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Serviceability Performance of Timber Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2353
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors

Timber-Concrete Composite Connectors in Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1275
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Shear Tests
Bending Tests
Vibration Tests
Dynamic Properties
Finite Element Model
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems are comprised of a timber element connected to a concrete slab through a mechanical shear connection. When TCC are used as flexural elements, the concrete and timber are located in compression and tension zones, respectively. A large number of precedents for T-beam configurations exist; however, the growing availability of flat plate engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America in combination with a concrete topping has offered designers and engineers greater versatility in terms of architectural expression and structural and building physics performance. The focus of this investigation was to experimentally determine the properties for a range of proprietary, open source, and novel TCC systems in several Canadian EWPs. Strength and stiffness properties were determined for 45 different TCC configurations based on over 300 small-scale shear tests. Nine connector configurations were selected for implementation in full-scale bending and vibration tests. Eighteen floor panels were tested for elastic stiffness under a quasi-static loading protocol and measurements of the dynamic properties were obtained prior to loading to failure. The tests confirmed that both hand calculations according to the -method and more detailed FEM models can predict the basic stiffness and dynamic properties of TCC floors within a reasonable degree of accuracy; floor capacities were more difficult to predict, however, failure did usually not occur until loading reached 10 times serviceability requirements. The research demonstrated that all selected connector configurations produced efficient timber-concrete-composite systems.
Online Access
Free
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Timber-Concrete Composites Using Flat-Plate Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue616
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Gerber, Adam
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Mid-Scale
Push-Out Tests
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
Timber-Concrete Composite (TCC) systems have been employed as an efficient solution in medium span structural applications; their use remains largely confined to European countries. TCC systems are generally comprised of a timber and concrete element with a shear connection between. A large number of precedents for T-beam configurations exist; however, the growing availability of flat plate engineered wood products (EWPs) in North America has offered designers greater versatility in terms of floor plans and architectural expression in modern timber and hybrid structures. The opportunity exists to enhance the strength, stiffness, fire, and vibration performance of floors using these products by introducing a concrete topping, connected to the timber to form a composite. A research program at the University of British Columbia Vancouver investigates the performance of five different connector types (a post-installed screw system, cast-in screws, glued-in steel mesh, adhesive bonded, and mechanical interlocking) in three different EWPs (Cross-Laminated-Timber, Laminated-Veneer-Lumber, and Laminated-Strand-Lumber). Over 200 mid-scale push-out tests were performed in the first stage of experimental work to evaluate the connector performance and to optimize the design of subsequent vibration and bending testing of full-scale specimens, including specimens subjected to long-term loading.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.