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Chinese High Rise Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with CLT Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2899
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Contiguglia, Carlotta
Pelle, Angelo
Lai, Zhichao
Briseghella, Bruno
Nuti, Camillo
Organization
Roma Tre University
Fuzhou University
Editor
Rosa, Maria
Masi, Angelo
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Retrofitting
Energy Efficiency
Architectural Improvement
Reinforced Concrete
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) panels have been gaining increasing attention in the construction field as a diaphragm in mid- to high-rise building projects. Moreover, in the last few years, due to their seismic performances, low environmental impact, ease of construction, etc., many research studies have been conducted about their use as infill walls in hybrid construction solutions. With more than a half of the megacities in the world located in seismic regions, there is an urgent need of new retrofitting methods that can improve the seismic behavior of the buildings, upgrading, at the same time, the architectural aspects while minimizing the environmental impact and costs associated with the common retrofit solutions. In this work, the seismic, energetic, and architectural rehabilitation of tall reinforced concrete (RC) buildings using CLT panels are investigated. An existing 110 m tall RC frame building located in Huizhou (China) was chosen as a case study. The first objective was to investigate the performances of the building through the non-linear static analysis (push-over analysis) used to define structural weaknesses with respect to earthquake actions. The architectural solution proposed for the building is the result of the combination between structural and architectonic needs: internal spaces and existing facades were re-designed in order to improve not only the seismic performances but also energy efficiency, quality of the air, natural lighting, etc. A full explanation of the FEM modeling of the cross laminated timber panels is reported in the following. Non-linear FEM models of connections and different wall configurations were validated through a comparison with available lab tests, and finally, a real application on the existing 3D building was discussed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Timber-concrete composite bridges: Three case studies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3053
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
General Information
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Gregori, Amedeo
Xue, Junqing
Demartino, Cristoforo
Toso, Matteo
Organization
University of L'Aquila
Fuzhou University
Nanjing Tech University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Connection System
Notched Connection
Case Study
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering
Summary
During the last years, timber-concrete composite (TCC) structures have been extensively used in Europe both in new and existing buildings. Generally speaking, a composite structure combines the advantages of both materials employed: the strength and stiffness of the concrete in compression and the tensile strength, lightweight, low embodied energy, and aesthetical appearance of the timber. The concrete slab provides protection of the timber beams from direct contact with water, which is crucial to ensure the durability of the timber beams, particularly when used for bridges. Different types of connectors can be used to provide force exchange between the concrete slab and the timber beam. The choice of a structurally effective yet cheap shear connection between the concrete topping and the timber joist is crucial to make the TCC structures a viable solution that can compete with reinforced concrete and steel structures. In this paper, the possibilities offered by TCC structures for short-span bridge decks are discussed. The technology of TCC structures and the general design rules are illustrated. Three case studies are reported, including a short-span bridge tested in Colorado, USA, with the timber layer being constructed from recycled utility poles and notch connection; a TCC bridge with glulam beams and triangular notches with epoxy-glued rebar connectors built in Portugal; and a TCC bridge with glulam beams and rectangular notches built in Germany. All the solutions were found to be structurally effective and aesthetically pleasing. They can all provide a sustainable option for short-span bridges.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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