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88 records – page 1 of 9.

100-Year Performance of Timber-Concrete Composite Bridges in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2561
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Wacker, James
Dias, Alfredo
Hosteng, Travis
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Concrete
Composite
Superstructure
Performance
Inspection
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Bridge Engineering
Summary
The use of timber–concrete composite (TCC) bridges in the United States dates back to approximately 1924 when the first bridge was constructed. Since then a large number of bridges have been built, of which more than 1,400 remain in service. The oldest bridges still in service are now more than 84 years old and predominately consist of two different TCC systems. The first system is a slab-type system that includes a longitudinal nail-laminated deck composite with a concrete deck top layer. The second system is a stringer system that includes either sawn timber or glulam stringers supporting a concrete deck top layer. The records indicate that most of the TCC highway bridges were constructed during the period of 1930–1960. The study presented in this paper discusses the experience and per-formance of these bridge systems in the US. The analysis is based on a review of the relevant literature and databases complemented with field inspections conducted within various research projects. Along with this review, a historical overview of the codes and guidelines available for the design of TCC bridges in the US is also included. The analysis undertaken showed that TCC bridges are an effective and durable design alternative for highway bridges once they have shown a high performance level, in some situations after more than 80 years in service with a low maintenance level.
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Advanced Quality and In-Service Condition Assessment Procedures for Mass Timber and Cross-Laminated Timber Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2558
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Mississippi State University
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Non-Destructive Evaluation
Bond Performance
Monitoring Techniques
Serviceability
Quality Assurance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Frederico França at Mississippi State University and Robert J. Ross at the Forest Products Laboratory
Summary
With the rapid development of CLT manufacturing capacity around the world and the increasing architectural acceptance and adoption, there is a current and pressing need regarding adhesive bond quality assurance in manufacturing. As with other engineered glued composites, adhesive bondline performance is critically important. Bondline assessment requires technology in the form of sensors, ultrasonics, load cells, or other means of reliable machine evaluation. The objectives of this cooperative study are to develop quality assurance procedures for monitoring the quality of mass timber and CLT during and after manufacturing and to develop assessment techniques for CLT panels in-service.
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Assessing Life-Cycle Environmental Impacts of CLT Mass Timber Buildings in the U.S. Northeast Region

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2535
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
The Nature Conservancy
University of Washington
Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials
Atelierjones
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
GHG emission reduction
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Hongmei Gu at the Forest Products Laboratory
Summary
The FPL team is in charge of developing a full comparative LCA study for three multiple-story mass timber buildings and their concrete alternatives in the U.S. Northeast region, with Boston as the point location. Using these three comparative LCAs, this research will determine the GHG emissions reduction potential from mass timber use in the building sector for the U.S. region. This may increase potential for growth in wood utilization, timber harvest, and forest management practices through the market demands.
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Assessment of Termite and Decay Damage to Mass Timber Elements in AWPA Ground Proximity and Above Ground Field Tests in Southern Mississippi

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3236
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Mankowski, Mark E.
Shelton, Thomas
Kirker, Grant
Morrell, Jeffrey J.
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Mass Panel Plywood
Ground Proximity Test
Above Ground Test
Soil Termiticide
Field Test
Durability
Decay
Termite
Conference
Proc. of 118th annual meeting of American Wood Protection Association
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The ability of soil insecticidal drenches or spray-on insecticide/fungicide treatments to protect mass timber elements was assessed using two modified AWPA ground proximity tests established in 2017 and 2019. The 2017 test evaluated 3-ply Douglas-fir cross-laminated timber using a modified AWPA Standard E26 while the 2019 test used a modified AWPA E21 protocol to evaluate 3-ply Douglas-fir or southern pine cross-laminated timber as well as Douglas-fir mass plywood panels. Both tests were installed at the Harrison Experimental Forest (Saucier, Mississippi) and will be assessed for five years. Treatments include an initial soil termiticide drench, spray-on borate at initiation, borate rods at initiation, remedial boron spray treatment two years after installation, and untreated controls. Samples were left undisturbed for one or two years and then rated for degree of termite and fungal damage. Moisture content of the test materials increased greatly over the non-disturbance period. Untreated control samples were attacked by both decay fungi and termites within the first year after test initiation. Soil termiticide treated plots showed no sign of termite attack, but decay was evident on some samples compared to non-soil termiticide treated plots. Samples treated with borates at test initiation showed limited decay or termite attack. The tests will continue to be evaluated for a period of at least 5 years or longer and serve as critical baseline data for field evaluation methods of mass timber in areas of high subterranean termite and decay pressure.
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Blast-Resistant Testing for Loaded Mass Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue843
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Exterior Walls
Blast Loads
Protection
Research Status
In Progress
Summary
Opening new markets for the use of CLT that can capitalize on the strength and speed of construction allowed by the technology creates the best opportunity for wood product market growth. One such market is the Department of Defense (DoD), representing an estimated 148 million board feet of additional lumber production. Wood products have been significantly under-represented in the DoD construction market because of their perceived performance in blast conditions. The objectives of this project are to develop a design methodology and to demonstrate performance for exterior bearing CLT walls used in buildings subject to force protection requirements. This methodology should be published by U.S. Army Corp of Engineers – Protective Design Center to be used by engineers for designing CLT elements to withstand blast loads as determined by code requirements and specific project conditions.
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Bonding Mixed Species for Advanced Biomaterials

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2321
Organization
USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory, Michigan Technological University
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Xiping Wang at the Forest Products Laboratory, and Xinfeng Xie at Michigan Technological University
Summary
This project is expected to reveal if cross-laminated mixed hardwood and softwood species would have bonding properties similar to softwood CLT using commercial adhesives for timber laminating. The results will provide baseline data on adhesion properties of bonding mixed northern wood species.
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Carbon impacts of engineered wood products in construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3235
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Author
Gu, Hongmei
Nepal, Prakash
Arvanitis, Matthew
Alderman, Delton
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Publisher
IntechOpen
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Book/Guide
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Mass Timber Products
Forest Carbon
Wood Products Carbon
Carbon Sequestration
Carbon Storage
Avoided Emissions
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Buildings and the construction sector together account for about 39% of the global energy-related CO2 emissions. Recent building designs are introducing promising new mass timber products that have the capacity to partially replace concrete and steel in traditional buildings. The inherently lower environmental impacts of engineered wood products for construction are seen as one of the key strategies to mitigate climate change through their increased use in the construction sector. This chapter synthesizes the estimated carbon benefits of using engineered wood products and mass timber in the construction sector based on insights obtained from recent Life Cycle Assessment studies in the topic area of reduced carbon emissions and carbon sequestration/storage.
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Comparative LCAs of Conventional and Mass Timber Buildings in Regions with Potential for Mass Timber Penetration

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2885
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Puettmann, Maureen
Pierobon, Francesca
Ganguly, Indroneil
Gu, Hongmei
Chen, Cindy
Liang, Shaobo
Jones, Susan
Maples, Ian
Wishnie, Mark
Organization
University of Washington
Forest Products Laboratory
Portland State University
Editor
Borghi, Adriana Del
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Mass Timber
Life-Cycle Assessment
Embodied Carbon
Embodied Energy
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Manufacturing of building materials and construction of buildings make up 11% of the global greenhouse gas emission by sector. Mass timber construction has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by moving wood into buildings with designs that have traditionally been dominated by steel and concrete. The environmental impacts of mass timber buildings were compared against those of functionally equivalent conventional buildings. Three pairs of buildings were designed for the Pacific Northwest, Northeast and Southeast regions in the United States to conform to mass timber building types with 8, 12, or 18 stories. Conventional buildings constructed with concrete and steel were designed for comparisons with the mass timber buildings. Over all regions and building heights, the mass timber buildings exhibited a reduction in the embodied carbon varying between 22% and 50% compared to the concrete buildings. Embodied carbon per unit of area increased with building height as the quantity of concrete, metals, and other nonrenewable materials increased. Total embodied energy to produce, transport, and construct A1–A5 materials was higher in all mass timber buildings compared to equivalent concrete. Further research is needed to predict the long-term carbon emissions and carbon mitigation potential of mass timber buildings to conventional building materials.
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Comparative Life-cycle Assessment of a Mass Timber Building and Concrete Alternative

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2429
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Liang, Shaobo
Gu, Hongmei
Bergman, Richard
Kelley, Stephen S.
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Keywords
Life Cycle Analysis
Tall Wood
Environmental Assessment
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
The US housing construction market consumes vast amounts of resources, with most structural elements derived from wood, a renewable and sustainable resource. The same cannot be said for all nonresidential or high-rise buildings, which are primarily made of concrete and steel. As part of continuous environmental improvement processes, building life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a useful tool to compare the environmental footprint of building structures. This study is a comparative LCA of an 8360-m2, 12-story mixed-use apartment/office building designed for Portland, OR, and constructed from mainly mass timber. The designed mass timber building had a relatively lightweight structural frame that used 1782 m3 of cross-laminated timber (CLT) and 557 m3 of glue-laminated timber (glulam) and associated materials, which replaced approximately 58% of concrete and 72% of rebar that would have been used in a conventional building. Compared with a similar concrete building, the mass timber building had 18%, 1%, and 47% reduction in the impact categories of global warming, ozone depletion, and eutrophication, respectively, for the A1-A5 building LCA. The use of CLT and glulam materials substantially decreased the carbon footprint of the building, although it consumed more primary energy compared with a similar concrete building. The impacts for the mass timber building were affected by large amounts of gypsum board, which accounted for 16% of total building mass. Both lowering the amount of gypsum and keeping the mass timber production close to the construction site could lower the overall environmental footprint of the mass timber building.
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Comparison of building construction and life-cycle cost for a high-rise mass timber building with its concrete alternative

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3219
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Environmental Impact
Author
Gu, Hongmei
Liang, Shaobo
Bergman, Richard
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Mass Timber Building
Concrete Building
Life Cycle Cost
Economic Impact
Research Status
Complete
Series
Forest Products Journal
Summary
Mass timber building materials such as cross-laminated timber (CLT) have captured attention in mid- to high-rise building designs because of their potential environmental benefits. The recently updated multistory building code also enables greater utilization of these wood building materials. The cost-effectiveness of mass timber buildings is also undergoing substantial analysis. Given the relatively new presence of CLT in United States, high front-end construction costs are expected. This study presents the life-cycle cost (LCC) for a 12-story, 8,360-m2 mass timber building to be built in Portland, Oregon. The goal was to assess its total life-cycle cost (TLCC) relative to a functionally equivalent reinforced-concrete building design using our in-house-developed LCC tool. Based on commercial construction cost data from the RSMeans database, a mass timber building design is estimated to have 26 percent higher front-end costs than its concrete alternative. Front-end construction costs dominated the TLCC for both buildings. However, a decrease of 2.4 percent TLCC relative to concrete building was observed because of the estimated longer lifespan and higher end-of-life salvage value for the mass timber building. The end-of-life savings from demolition cost or salvage values in mass timber building could offset some initial construction costs. There are minimal historical construction cost data and lack of operational cost data for mass timber buildings; therefore, more studies and data are needed to make the generalization of these results. However, a solid methodology for mass timber building LCC was developed and applied to demonstrate several cost scenarios for mass timber building benefits or disadvantages.
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88 records – page 1 of 9.