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88 records – page 1 of 9.

Timber Rivets in Structural Composite Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue777
Year of Publication
2004
Topic
Connections
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Author
Wolfe, Ronald
Begel, Marshall
Craig, Bruce
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2004
Format
Report
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Pine
Poplar
Rivets
Failure
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber rivet connections, originally developed for use with glulam construction, may be a viable option for use with structural composite lumber (SCL) products. Tests were conducted on small samples to assess the performance and predictability of timber rivet connections in parallel strand lumber (PSL) and laminated strand lumber (LSL). The test joint configurations were designed to exhibit ìrivet failuresîósome combination of rivet yield and bearing deformation in the compositeóas opposed to wood failure modes, such as block-shear tear-out or splitting. Results suggest that per-rivet design values should fall between 1 and 2 kN, depending on species and density of the composite and load direction with respect to grain of the composite strands. Timber rivets performed better in LSL than in PSL and better in yellow poplar PSL than in Douglas-fir or Southern Pine PSL; 40-mm rivets in yellow poplar LSL gave roughly equivalent performance to 65-mm rivets in yellow poplar PSL.
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Durability of Structural Lumber Products after Exposure at 82C and 80% Relative Humidity

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue784
Year of Publication
2005
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Author
Green, David
Evans, James
Hatfield, Cherilyn
Byrd, Pamela
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2005
Format
Report
Material
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Aspen
Douglas-Fir
Modulus of Elasticity
Modulus of Rupture
Southern Pine
Poplar
Relative Humidity
SPF
Temperature
Flexural Properties
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Solid-sawn lumber (Douglas-fir, southern pine, Spruce– Pine–Fir, and yellow-poplar), laminated veneer lumber (Douglas-fir, southern pine, and yellow-poplar), and laminated strand lumber (aspen and yellow-poplar) were heated continuously at 82°C (180°F) and 80% relative humidity (RH) for periods of up to 24 months. The lumber was then reconditioned to room temperature at 20% RH and tested in edgewise bending. Little reduction occurred in modulus of elasticity (MOE) of solid-sawn lumber, but MOE of composite lumber products was somewhat reduced. Modulus of rupture (MOR) of solid-sawn lumber was reduced by up to 50% after 24 months exposure. Reductions in MOR of up to 61% were found for laminated veneer lumber and laminated strand lumber after 12 months exposure. A limited scope study indicated that the results for laminated veneer lumber in edgewise bending are also applicable to flatwise bending. Comparison with previous results at 82°C (180°F)/25% RH and at 66°C (150°F)/20% RH indicate that differences in the permanent effect of temperature on MOR between species of solid-sawn lumber and between solid-sawn lumber and composite lumber products are greater at high humidity levels than at low humidity levels. This report also describes the experimental design of a program to evaluate the permanent effect of temperature on flexural properties of structural lumber, with reference to previous publications on the immediate effect of temperature and the effect of moisture content on lumber properties.
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Fire Resistance of Structural Composite Lumber Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue790
Year of Publication
2006
Topic
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Author
White, Robert
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2006
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Char Rate
Fire Resistance
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber products to determine char rate when subjected to the fire exposure of the standard fire resistance test. Char rate tests on 10 of the composite lumber products were also conducted in an intermediate-scale horizontal furnace. The National Design Specification/Technical Report 10 design procedure for calculating fire resistance ratings of exposed wood members can be used to predict failure times for members loaded in tension. Thirteen tests were conducted in which composite lumber products were loaded in tension as they were subjected to the standard fire exposure of ASTM E 119. Charring rates, observed failure times in tension tests, and deviations from predicted failure times of the structural composite lumber products were within expected range of results for sawn lumber and glued laminated timbers.
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Wood Handbook, Wood as an Engineering Material

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue839
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
General Information
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2010
Format
Book/Guide
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Adhesives
Bonding
Fasteners
Moisture Content
Physical Properties
Preservative
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses. Keywords: wood structure, physical properties (wood), mechanical properties (wood), lumber, wood-based composites, plywood, panel products, design, fastenings, wood moisture, drying, gluing, fire resistance, finishing, decay, preservation, wood-based products, heat sterilization, sustainable use.
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Cross-Laminated Timber Roof Panels at the Promega Corporation Facility: Documenting Installation and Monitoring In-Service Moisture Conditions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue801
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Glass, Samuel
Romanin, Jennifer
Schumacher, Jim
Spickler, Kris
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2013
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture
Temperature
Installation Process
Sensors
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) has, for the past two years, been assisting in removing technical barriers to the use of CLT and trying to develop interest in the United States for its utilization. Coincidentally, Promega Corporation, a leader in providing innovative solutions and technical support to the life sciences industry, is currently constructing a new facility in Fitchburg, Wisconsin, that features CLT. This is the first large-scale commercial utilization of CLT in the United States using CLT manufactured in North America. As with any new building system, it is important for the design and construction community to have information on how CLT is installed and how it performs. The objectives of this research are twofold: (1) to document the CLT installation process with photography and video and (2) to install sensors in the CLT panels and collect data on in-service moisture and temperature conditions.
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Cradle-To-Gate Life-Cycle Assessment of Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) Produced in the Southeast Region of the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue782
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Bergman, Richard
Alanya-Rosenbaum, Sevda
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Impact Assessment
US
Production
Life-Cycle Assessment
Cradle-to-Gate
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The goal of the present study was to develop life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) data associated with gate-to-gate laminated veneer lumber (LVL) production in the southeast (SE) region of the U.S. with the ultimate aim of constructing an updated cradle-to-gate mill output life-cycle assessment (LCA). The authors collected primary (survey) mill data from LVL production facilities per Consortium on Research for Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM) Research Guidelines. Comparative assertions were not a goal of the present study.
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Cradle-To-Gate Life-Cycle Assessment of Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) Produced in the Pacific Northwest Region of the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue783
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Bergman, Richard
Alanya-Rosenbaum, Sevda
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
US
Cradle-to-Gate
Production
Life-Cycle Inventory
Life-Cycle Impact Assessment
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The goal of this study was to update life-cycle assessment (LCA) data associated with laminated veneer lumber (LVL) production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the United States from cradle-to-gate mill output. The authors collected primary mill data from LVL production facilities per Consortium on Research for Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM) Research Guidelines. Comparative assertions were not a goal of this study.
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Free
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Development and full-scale validation of resilience-based seismic design of tall wood buildings: the NEHRI Tallwood Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3228
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Author
Pei, S.
Lindt, J. W. van de
Ricles, J.
Sause, R.
Berman, J.
Ryan, K.
Dolan, J. D.
Buchanan, A.
Robinson, T.
McDonnell, E.
Blomgren, H.
Popovski, M.
Rammer, D.
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Lehigh University
University of Washington
University of Nevada Reno
Washington State University
PTL Consultants
Lever Architectures
KPFF
Katerra
FPInnovations
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Seismic Design
NHERI
Tallwood Project
Conference
2017 NZSEE conference proceedings
Research Status
Complete
Notes
Wellington, NZ
Summary
With global urbanization trends, the demands for tall residential and mixed-use buildings in the range of 8~20 stories are increasing. One new structural system in this height range are tall wood buildings which have been built in select locations around the world using a relatively new heavy timber structural material known as cross laminated timber (CLT). With its relatively light weight, there is consensus amongst the global wood seismic research and practitioner community that tall wood buildings have a substantial potential to become a key solution to building future seismically resilient cities. This paper introduces the NHERI Tallwood Project recentely funded by the U.S. National Science Fundation to develop and validate a seismic design methodology for tall wood buildings that incorporates high-performance structural and nonstructural systems and can quantitatively account for building resilience. This will be accomplished through a series of research tasks planned over a 4-year period. These tasks will include mechanistic modeling of tall wood buildings with several variants of post-tensioned rocking CLT wall systems, fragility modeling of structural and non-structural building components that affect resilience, full-scale biaxial testing of building sub-assembly systems, development of a resilience-based seismic design (RBSD) methodology, and finally a series of full-scale shaking table tests of a 10-story CLT building specimen to validate the proposed design. The project will deliver a new tall building type capable of transforming the urban building landscape by addressing urbanization demand while enhancing resilience and sustainability.
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Potential impact of subterranean termites on cross-laminated timber (CLT) in the Southeastern U.S

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3229
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Stokes, Elizabeth C.
Shmulsky, Rubin
Tang, Juliet D.
Organization
Mississippi State University
USDA Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Termites
X-Ray Scanning
Moisture Content
Conference
Proceedings, American wood protection association
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an emerging product in the North American mass timber market. Intended to compete with pre-cast concrete panels for modular construction, these laminated wall and floor-sized panels have been successfully used in European construction markets for the past 20 years. However, introduction of this material to areas of North America that have high pressure from subterranean termite and decay fungi may prove detrimental to the potential market for this product. This paper describes ongoing work seeking to describe interactions between CLT with both native and introduced termite species in the southeastern United States. Early results indicate that this material is susceptible to feeding by termites, is capable of water uptake providing a habitable environment within the material for decay organisms, and may not be easily evaluated by conventional means (i.e. visual rating currently in use versus more advanced X-ray scanning described here).
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Investigation of early timber–concrete composite bridges in the United States

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3251
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
General Information
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Wacker, James P.
Dias, Alfredo
Hosteng, Travis K.
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Bridge Inventory
Composite Systems
Longevity
Conference
3rd international conference on timber bridges 2017
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The use of timber–concrete composite (TCC) bridges in the United States dates back to circa 1925. Two different TCC systems were constructed during this early period. The first system included a longitudinal nail-laminated deck composite with a concrete deck top layer. The second system included sawn timber stringers supporting a concrete deck top layer. Records indicate that most of the TCC highway bridges were constructed between 1930 and 1960. The current U.S. National Bridge Inventory (NBI) database indicates that there may be well over 1,000 of this bridge type still in service. This paper will review and discuss the current conditions of several TCC bridges that remain in service today. This will be based on the information given in the NBI and other relevant documents, complemented with information provided by 25 field inspections undertaken during June 2016 in the Pacific Northwest states of Oregon and Washington.
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Free
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88 records – page 1 of 9.