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Measuring-Up In Timber: A Critical Perspective on Mid- and High-Rise Timber Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue607
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Fleming, Patrick
Smith, Simon
Ramage, Michael
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Europe
Research Status
Complete
Series
arq: Architectural Research Quarterly
Summary
Architects, engineers and researchers alike often cite practical reasons for building with wood. Since the development of curved glulam beams and columns over a century ago, the widespread use of massive structural timber elements has allowed architects and engineers to design and build in wood with unprecedented speed and scale. Moreover, rising concerns of climate change and the carbon-dioxide emissions associated with construction encourage the use of wood as a viable alternative to steel and concrete, due to CO2 sequestration in trees. In mid- and high-rise buildings, the current shift from steel and concrete towards massive structural timber elements like glulam, laminated-veneer lumber (LVL) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) is evident in a number of recently completed timber buildings in Europe, ranging from seven to nine storeys. Several speculative design proposals have also been made for ‘timber towers’ of thirty, fortytwo and even sixty-five storeys, recognising that designing with massive structural timber elements in high-rise buildings is still in its infancy. This paper offers a new perspective on building with wood at this scale, beyond carbon sequestrationand construction.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Tectonic Strategies for Using Fast-Growing, Low-Grade Softwoods for Engineered Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue565
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Fleming, Patrick
Ramage, Michael
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Low-Grade
Softwood
Polymer Impregnated
Stress Laminated
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The proposed paper presents two alternative strategies for using fast-growing, low-grade softwood for modern engineered wood products. A chemical based strategy is explored first with the testing of polymer-impregnated small clear wood samples. A second mechanical based strategy based on the tectonics of stress-laminated bridge decks is examined in further detail with 1:10 scaled structural models, followed later on by full-scale testing. The relative benefits and disadvantages of each strategy are compared to each other, and benchmarked against regular sawn timber and conventional engineered wood products like glulam and cross-laminated timber.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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The wood from the trees: The use of timber in construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3257
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
General Information
Author
Ramage, Michael H.
Burridge, Henry
Busse-Wicher, Marta
Fereday, George
Reynolds, Thomas
Shah, Darshil U.
Wu, Guanglu
Yu, li
Fleming, Patrick
Densley-Tingley, Danielle
Allwood, Julian
Dupree, Paul
Linden, P.F.
Scherman, Oren
Organization
University of Cambridge
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Embodied Energy
Timber Supply Chain
Engineered Wood Products
Wood Modification
End-of-Life
Research Status
Complete
Series
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Summary
Trees, and their derivative products, have been used by societies around the world for thousands of years. Contemporary construction of tall buildings from timber, in whole or in part, suggests a growing interest in the potential for building with wood at a scale not previously attainable. As wood is the only significant building material that is grown, we have a natural inclination that building in wood is good for the environment. But under what conditions is this really the case? The environmental benefits of using timber are not straightforward; although it is a natural product, a large amount of energy is used to dry and process it. Much of this can come from the biomass of the tree itself, but that requires investment in plant, which is not always possible in an industry that is widely distributed among many small producers. And what should we build with wood? Are skyscrapers in timber a good use of this natural resource, or are there other aspects of civil and structural engineering, or large-scale infrastructure, that would be a better use of wood? Here, we consider a holistic picture ranging in scale from the science of the cell wall to the engineering and global policies that could maximise forestry and timber construction as a boon to both people and the planet.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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