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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Behaviour of FRP Retrofitted Glued-Laminated (Glulam) Beams Subjected to Simulated Blast Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1550
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Lacroix, Daniel
Doudak, Ghasan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Retrofitted
Static Loads
Dynamic Loads
GFRP
Damage
Predictive Model
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1207-1214
Summary
Preliminary results from an experimental program investigating the behaviour of retrofitted glulam beams subjected to static and dynamic loads are presented in this paper. The effect of glass fibre-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) laminates applied on the tension side was investigated under both static and dynamic loading as a potential retrofit on undamaged specimens. Furthermore, previously damaged beams were restored by applying GFRP confinement to the damaged region. The experimental results showed that the capacity of the retrofitted beams was improved significantly and the restored beams attained a significant level of their original dynamic capacity. Future work involves the development of a material predictive model that can account for the high-strain rate effects as well as investigating more retrofit options.
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Behaviour of Glued-Laminated (Glulam) Beams and Columns Subjected to Simulated Blast Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1549
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Columns
Author
Lacroix, Daniel
Doudak, Ghasan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Columns
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Blast Loads
Static Loads
Dynamic Loads
Dynamic Tests
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1199-1206
Summary
This paper presents preliminary results from an experimental program investigating the dynamic behaviour of glulam beams and columns subjected to simulated blast loads. A total of eight glulam beams and columns were tested destructively under static and dynamic loads. Based on the dynamic tests conducted on the beams, an increase in strength under dynamic loading, relative to that measured under the static loading, was observed. A material predictive model that accounts for high strain-rate effects is developed. The experimental displacement-time histories were reasonably well predicted through a single-degree-of-freedom approach which used the proposed resistance model as input.
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Dynamic Characteristics of Glulam Beam and Deck-Element Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1717
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Mehdi Ebadi, Mohammad
Doudak, Ghasan
Smith, Ian
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Vibration Response
One-Way
Finite Element Model
Experimental
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4547-4554
Summary
Low amplitude cyclic vertical motions of flat floors that humans find unacceptable are commonly caused by impacts resulting from their own activities or those of other people. It is therefore a goal of engineering design to identify and avoid construction methods prone to creation of motions that make floors unserviceable for an intended...
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Equivalent-frame Model for Elastic Behaviour of Cross-laminated Timber Walls with Openings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2417
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Mestar, Mohammed
Doudak, Ghasan
Caola, Maurizio
Casagrande, Daniele
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Scotland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Computational Mechanics
Structural Frameworks
Timber Structures
Elastic Behaviour
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Structures and Buildings
Online Access
Free
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Flexural Response of Glued Laminated (Glulam) Beams Subjected to Blast Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue492
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Lacroix, Daniel
Viau, Christian
Doudak, Ghasan
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strain
Flexural Behaviour
Blast Loads
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
An extensive body of research is currently available on the behaviour of concrete and steel structures when subjected to blast threats, however, little to no details on how to address the design or retrofitting of wood structures are available. In this paper, preliminary results, both experimental and analytical, are presented on the flexural behaviour of glulam beams under high strain rates. A total of three 80 mm x 228 mm x 2,500 mm glulam beams with a clear span of 2,235 mm were subjected to simulated blast loads using a shock tube. The preliminary experimental results showed that a brash tension failure mode was observed on the tension laminate. It was also shown that a simplified SDOF model, using linear elastic resistance curves, was capable of predicting the failure displacement and level of damage with reasonable accuracy.
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Lateral Torsional Buckling of Wood Beams: Fea-Modelling and Sensitivity Analysis

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue590
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Xiao, Qiuwu
Doudak, Ghasan
Mohareb, Magdi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Lateral Torsional Buckling Capacity
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
A finite element model was developed for glue-laminated wood beams modelled as an orthotropic material and comparisons with the classical solution as well as experimental results were made. The model was able to capture the buckling response and capacity of such cases and was extended to assess the influence of orthotropic constitutive properties on the lateral torsional buckling capacity of wooden beams. Lateral torsional buckling (LTB) is a failure mode that occurs when the member is bent about the major axis of the cross-section where simultaneous lateral displacement and twist take place suddenly. For large span unsupported members, the resistance based on LTB may be less than that based on material failure. The current study aims to obtain critical moment for glue-laminated beams through experimental testing and finite element modelling.
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Vertical Movement in Wood Platform Frame Structures: Design and Detailing Solutions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue736
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Doudak, Ghasan
Lepper, Peggy
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Differential Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Most buildings are designed to accommodate a certain range of movement. In design, it is important for designers to identify locations where potential differential movement could affect structural integrity and serviceability, predict the amount of differential movement and develop proper detailing to accommodate it. To allow non-structural materials to be appropriately constructed, estimate of anticipated differential movement should be provided in the design drawings. Simply specifying wood materials with lower MC at time of delivery does not guarantee that the wood will not get wet on construction sites and will deliver lower shrinkage amounts as anticipated. It is therefore important to ensure that wood does not experience unexpected wetting during storage, transportation and construction. Good construction sequencing also plays an important role in reducing wetting, the consequent wood shrinkage and other moisture-related issues. Existing documents such as the APEGBC Technical and Practice Bulletin on 5- and 6-Storey Wood Frame Residential Building Projects, the Best Practice Guide published by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), the Building Enclosure Design Guide – Wood Frame Multi-Unit Residential Buildings published by the BC Housing- Homeowner Protection Office (HPO) provide general design guidance on how to reduce and accommodate differential movement in platform frame construction.
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Free
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Vertical Movement in Wood Platform Frame Structures: Movement Prediction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue737
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Doudak, Ghasan
Lepper, Peggy
Ni, Chun
Wang, Jasmine
Organization
Canadian Wood Council
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Content
Shrinkage
Swelling
Adhesives
Differential Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
It is not possible or practical to precisely predict the vertical movement of wood structures due to the many factors involved in construction. It is, however, possible to obtain a good estimate of the vertical movement to avoid structural, serviceability, and building envelope problems over the life of the structure. Typically “S-Dry” and “S-Grn” lumber will continue to lose moisture during storage, transportation and construction as the wood is kept away from liquid water sources and adapts to different atmospheric conditions. For the purpose of shrinkage prediction, it is usually customary to assume an initial moisture content (MC) of 28% for “S-Green” lumber and 19% for “S-Dry” lumber. “KD” lumber is assumed to have an initial MC of 15% in this series of fact sheets. Different from solid sawn wood products, Engineered Wood Products (EWP) are usually manufactured with MC levels close to or even lower than the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in service. Plywood, Oriented Strand Board (OSB), Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL), Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL), and Parallel Strand Lumber (PSL) are usually manufactured at MC levels ranging from 6% to 12%. Engineered wood I-joists are made using kiln dried lumber (usually with moisture content below 15%) or structural composite lumber (such as LVL) flanges and plywood or OSB webs, therefore they are usually drier and have lower shrinkage than typical “S-Dry” lumber floor joists. Glued-laminated timbers (Glulam) are manufactured at MC levels from 11% to 15%, so are the recently-developed Cross-laminated Timbers (CLT). For all these products, low shrinkage can be achieved and sometimes small amounts of swelling can be expected in service if their MC at manufacturing is lower than the service EMC. In order to fully benefit from using these dried products including “S-Dry” lumber and EWP products, care must be taken to prevent them from wetting such as by rain during shipment, storage and construction. EWPs may also have lower shrinkage coefficients than solid wood due to the adhesives used during manufacturing and the more mixed grain orientations in the products, including the use of cross-lamination of veneers (plywood) or lumber (CLT). The APEGBC Technical and Practice Bulletin emphasizes the use of EWP and dimension lumber with 12% moisture content for the critical horizontal members to reduce differential movement in 5 and 6-storey wood frame buildings.
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8 records – page 1 of 1.