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CLT Infill Panels in Steel Moment Resisting Frames as a Hybrid Seismic Force Resisting System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue107
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dickof, Carla
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Seismic Force Resisting System
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This paper examines CLT-steel hybrid systems at three, six, and nine storey heights to increase seismic force resistance compared to a plain wood system. CLT panels are used as infill in a steel moment frame combining the ductility of a steel moment frame system with a stiffness and light weight of CLT panels. This system allows for the combination of high strength and ductility of steel with high stiffness and light weight of timber. This thesis examines the seismic response of this type of hybrid seismic force resisting system (SFRS) in regions with moderate to high seismic hazard indices. A detailed non-linear model of a 2D infilled frame system and compared to the behavior of a similar plain steel frame at each height. Parametric analysis was performed determining the effect of the panels and the connection configuration, steel frame design, and panel configuration in a multi-bay system. Static pushover loading was applied alongside semi-static cyclic loading to allow a basis of comparison to future experimental tests. Dynamic analysis using ten ground motions linearly scaled to the uniform hazard spectra for Vancouver, Canada with a return period of 2% in 50 years as, 10% in 50 years, and 50% in 50 years to examine the effect of infill panels on the interstorey drift of the three, six, and nine storey. The ultimate and yield strength and drift capacity are determined and used to determine the overstrength and ductility factors as described in the National Building Code of Canada 2010.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Walls in Balloon Construction: Seismic Performance of Steel Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2413
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls

Design Options for Three- and Four-Storey Wood School Buildings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2373
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bevilacqua, Nick
Dickof, Carla
Wolfe, Ray
Gan, Wei-Jie
Embury-Williams, Lynn
Organization
Fast + Epp
Wood Works! BC
Thinkspace
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Construction
Education
School Buildings
Mass Timber
Multi-Storey
Building Code
Fire Protection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This study illustrates the range of possible wood construction approaches for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. As land values continue to rise, particularly in higher-density urban environments, schools with smaller footprints will become increasingly more necessary to satisfy enrollment demands. There are currently a number of planned new school projects throughout British Columbia that anticipate requiring either three-or four-storey buildings, and it is forecasted that the demand for school buildings of this size will continue to rise. This study is closely related to the report Risk Analysis and Alternative Solution for Three- and Four-Storey Schools of Mass Timber and/or Wood-Frame Construction prepared by GHL Consultants, which explores the building code related considerations of wood construction for school buildings that are up to four storeys in height. Though wood construction offers a viable structural material option for these buildings, the British Columbia Building Code (BCBC 2018) currently limits schools comprised of wood construction to a maximum of two storeys, while also imposing limits on the overall floor area. As such, the reader is referred to the GHL report for further information regarding building code compliance (with a particular emphasis on fire protection) for wood school buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Wood-Steel Hybrid Seismic Force Resisting Systems: Seismic Ductility

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue330
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Dickof, Carla
Stiemer, Siegfried
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Overstrength
Ductility
Stiffness
Seismic Force Resisting System
Pushover Response
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
July 15-19, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
North American building codes currently provide strict limits on height of wood structures, where for example, in Canada wood structures are limited to 4 or 5 storeys. This paper examines wood-steel hybrid system to increase seismic force resistance beyo...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail