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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Evaluation of the Mechanical Properties of Cross Laminated Bamboo Panels by Digital Image Correlation and Finite Element Modelling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue533
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Other Materials
Author
Archila-Santos, Hector
Brandon, Daniel
Ansell, Martin
Walker, Pete
Ormondroyd, Graham
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Other Materials
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bamboo
Finite Element Model
Compression
Shear
Digital Image Correlation
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Guadua angustifolia Kunth (Guadua) is a bamboo species native to South and Central America that has been widely used for structural applications in small and large scale buildings, bridges and temporary structures. Guadua remains a material for vernacular construction associated with high levels of manual labour and structural unpredictability. The aim of this work is to develop standardised industrial structural products from Guadua and to measure and predict their mechanical behaviour. Cross laminated Guadua (CLG) panels comprised of three and five layers were manufactured and their mechanical properties evaluated by testing small and large specimens in compression and shear. The digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to measure strain variations in the X, Y and Z axes on the surface of small CLG panels with strain gauge measurements on the reverse face. The deformation of large CLG panels was measured using DIC on the front face and transducers on the reverse face. The results from mechanical tests and DIC were compared and a finite element (FE) model developed that predicts the response of the material. Overall, this study provides guidelines for structural design with engineered bamboo products which are of key importance for their mainstream use.
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Fire and Structural Performance of Non-Metallic Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue152
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Creep
Deflection
Dowels
Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Model
Densified Veneer Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent studies showed the need for timber connections with high fire performance. Connections of members in timber structures commonly comprise steel connectors, such as dowels, screws, nails and toothed plates. However, multiple studies have shown that the presence of exposed metal in timber connections leads to a poor performance under fire conditions. Replacing metallic fasteners with non-metallic fasteners potentially enhances the fire performance of timber connections. Previous studies showed that Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) dowels can be a viable replacement for steel dowels and that Densified Veneer Wood functions well as a flitch plate material. However, as the resin matrix of GFRP dowels is viscoelastic, connection creep, which is not studied before, can be of concern. Also no research has been carried out on the fire performance of these connections. Therefore, a study of the creep behaviour and the fire performance of non-metallic timber connections comprising GFRP dowels and a Densified Veneer Wood flitch plate was performed, as is discussed in this thesis. Predictive models were proposed to determine the connection slip and load bearing capacity at ambient and elevated temperatures and in a fire. The material properties and heat transfer properties required for these models were determined experimentally and predictions of these models were experimentally validated. Furthermore, an adjustment of the predictive model of connection slip at ambient temperature allowed approximating the creep of the connection. The material properties, required for the creep model, were determined experimentally and predictions of the model were compared to results of longterm connection tests. The study confirmed that timber members jointed with non-metallic connectors have a significantly improved fire performance to timber joints using metallic connections. Models developed and proposed to predict fire performance gave accurate predictions of time to failure. It was concluded that non-metallic connections showed more creep per load per connector, than metallic connections. However, the ratio between initial deflection and creep (relative creep) and the ratio between load level and creep were shown to be similar for metallic and non-metallic connections.
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Fire Performance of Metal-Free Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2186
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Fire
Connections
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams
Columns
Trusses
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Maluk, Cristian
Ansell, Martin
Harris, Richard
Walker, Pete
Bisby, Luke
Bregulla, Julie
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams
Columns
Trusses
Topic
Fire
Connections
Keywords
Fire Performance
Steel Connections
Thermal Conductivity
Thermal Behaviour
Mechanical Behavior
Metal-Free Connections
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Construction Materials
Notes
DOI link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1680/coma.14.00055
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Fire Performance of Metal-Free Timber Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue82
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Connections
Fire
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Maluk, Cristian
Ansell, Martin
Harris, Richard
Walker, Pete
Bisby, Luke
Bregulla, Julie
Publisher
ICE Publishing
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Fire
Keywords
Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Thermal Behaviour
Mechanical Behaviour
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Construction Materials
ISSN
1747-6518
Summary
The fire performance of heavy timber frame structures is often limited by the poor fire performance of its connections. Conventional timber connections, dowelled or toothed plate connections typically use steel as a connector material. In a fire, the steel parts rapidly conduct heat into the timber, leading to reduced fire performance. Replacing metallic connectors with alternative non-metallic, low thermal conductivity connector materials can, therefore, lead to improved connection performance in fire. This paper presents an experimental study into the fire performance of metal-free timber connections comprising a hot-pressed plywood flitch plate and glass-fibre-reinforced polymer dowels. The thermal behaviour of the connections at elevated temperatures is studied using a standard cone calorimeter apparatus and a novel heat transfer rate inducing system. The latter is a fire testing system developed at the University of Edinburgh. The mechanical behaviour of the connection during severe heating was also studied using an environmental chamber at temperatures up to 610°C. The results demonstrate that heat transfer in the non-metallic connections is governed by the thermal properties of the timber, resulting in significant enhancements in connection fire performance.
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Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings – Phase 2: Task 1 - Literature Review

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1215
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Östman, Birgit
Publisher
Fire Protection Research Foundation
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Heat Release Rate
Charring Rate
Compartment Fire Test
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent architectural trends include the design and construction of increasingly tall buildings with structural components comprised of engineered wood referred to by names including; cross laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), or glued laminated timber (Glulam). These buildings are cited for their advantages in sustainability resulting from the use of wood as a renewable construction material. Previous research has shown that timber elements contribute to the fuel load in buildings and can increase the initial fire growth rate – potentially overwhelming fire protection system and creating more severe conditions for occupants, emergency responders, and nearby properties. The overarching goal of this project Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings Phase 2 is to quantify the contribution of CLT building elements (wall and/or floor-ceiling assemblies) in compartment fires and provide data to allow comparison of the performance of CLT systems against other building systems commonly used in tall buildings.
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Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings. Phase 2: Task 4 - Engineering Methods

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1212
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Publisher
Fire Protection Research Foundation
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Keywords
Gypsum
Design
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent architectural trends include the design and construction of increasingly tall buildings with structural components comprised of engineered wood referred to by names including: cross laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), or glued laminated timber (Glulam). These buildings are cited for their advantages in sustainability resulting from the use of wood as a renewable construction material. Previous research has shown that timber elements contribute to the fuel load in buildings and can increase the initial fire growth rate – potentially overwhelming fire protection system and creating more severe conditions for occupants, emergency responders, and nearby properties. The overarching goal of this project Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings Phase 2 (involving five tasks) is to quantify the contribution of CLT building elements (wall and/or floor-ceiling assemblies) in compartment fires and provide data to allow comparison of the performance of CLT systems against other building systems commonly used in tall buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings - Phase 2: Task 5 – Experimental Study of Delamination of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Fire

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1211
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Brandon, Daniel
Dagenais, Christian
Publisher
Fire Protection Research Foundation
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Connections
Keywords
Delamination
Adhesives
Compartment Fires
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recent architectural trends include the design and construction of increasingly tall buildings with structural components comprised of engineered wood referred to by names including; cross laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), or glued laminated timber (Glulam). These buildings are cited for their advantages in sustainability resulting from the use of wood as a renewable construction material. Previous research has shown that timber elements contribute to the fuel load in buildings and can increase the initial fire growth rate – potentially overwhelming fire protection system and creating more severe conditions for occupants, emergency responders, and nearby properties. The overarching goal of this project Fire Safety Challenges of Tall Wood Buildings Phase 2 (involving five tasks) is to quantify the contribution of CLT building elements (wall and/or floor-ceiling assemblies) in compartment fires and provide data to allow comparison of the performance of CLT systems against other building systems commonly used in tall buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.