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On the Lateral Stability of Multi-Story Mass-Timber Buildings Subjected to Tornado-Like Wind Field

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1972
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Wind
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Gairola, Anant
Bitsuamlak, Girma
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Popovski, Marjan
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Lateral Load Resisting Systems
Tornadoes
Dynamic
Wind Loading
Lateral Instability
Enhanced Fujita
Boundary Layer Flow
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this paper, we examined the effects of extreme tornadic wind loads on mass-timber buildings. In general, mass-timber buildings utilize pre-engineered wood panels to form their main gravity and lateral load resisting systems. The lightweight nature of timber makes these types of emerging buildings lighter and more flexible than buildings made from concrete, masonry or steel. In general, global lateral instability of buildings can occur when the overturning forces due to wind loads exceed the dead load of the structures. In the present study, wind loads were obtained from laboratory simulations of tornado-like wind field and atmospheric boundary layer flow at Western University, Canada. Tornado wind loads from the laboratory tests were scaled to five Enhanced Fujita wind speeds representing various levels of damage. Dynamic structural analyses were carried out to assess floor level demands. It is shown that extreme tornado wind loads may pose significant damage to mass-timber buildings designed for 1-in-50 wind speed using a load factor of 1.4. Based on the obtained results, design strategies are suggested for mass-timber buildings in tornado-prone areas.
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Free
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Risk-Based Wind Design of Tall Mass-Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1970
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Bitsuamlak, Girma
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Tall Wood
Tall Timber
Wind Loading
Fragility Curves
Dynamic Tests
Conference
The Canadian Society for Civil Engineers Annual Conference
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The rapid growth of urban population and the associated environmental concerns are partly influencing city planners and construction stakeholders to consider “Sustainable Urbanization” alternatives. In this regard, recent urban design strategies are entertaining the use of “tall timber buildings.” Generally, tall mass-timber buildings (MTBs) utilize pre-engineered wood panels to form their main gravity and lateral load resisting systems, which makes them lighter and more flexible than buildings made from concrete, masonry or steel. As a result, frequent exposure to excessive wind-induced vibrations can cause occupant discomfort and possible inhabitability of the buildings. This paper attempts to apply a risk-based procedure to design a 102-meter tall MTB by adapting and extending the Alan G. Davenport Wind Loading Chain as a probabilistic performance-based wind engineering framework. The structural systems of the study building are composed of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) shear walls, CLT floors, glulam columns, and reinforced-concrete link beams. Initially, aerodynamic wind tunnel tests were carried out at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory of Western University on the 1:200 scale MTB model to obtain transient wind loads. Subsequently, using the wind tunnel data, the study MTB was structurally designed. In the riskbased performance assessment, uncertainties were incorporated at each step of the Wind Loading Chain, i.e., local wind, exposure, aerodynamics, dynamic effects, and criteria. These uncertainties were explicitly modeled as random variables. Dynamic structural analyses were carried out in the frequency domain to include the amplification due to the resonance component of the excitation. Structural reliability analysis through Monte Carlo sampling was used to propagate the uncertainties through the Wind Loading Chain to quantify the risk of inhabitability and excessive deflection. The results of reliability analysis were used to develop fragility curves for wind vulnerability estimations. Based on the results, the effects of various uncertainties are discussed, and risk-based design decisions are forwarded.
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Free
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Wind and Earthquake Design Framework for Tall Wood-Concrete Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2143
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Skandalos, Konstantinos
Martinez, Edel
Dires, Selamawit
Bitsuamlak, Girma
Goda, Katsuichiro
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Keywords
Tall Wood
Seismic design factors
Wind tunnel test
Ductility Factors
Timber-reinforced concrete
Force Modification Factors
Probabilistic Model
Wind Load
Overstrength seismic force
Research Status
Complete
Notes
DOI 10.14288/1.0380777
Summary
Advancement in engineered wood products altered the existing building height limitations and enhanced wooden structural members that are available on the market. These coupled with the need for a sustainable and green solution to address the ever-growing urbanization demand, avails wood as possible candidate for primary structural material in the construction industry. To this end, several researches carried out in the past decade to come up with sound structural solutions using a timber based structural system. Green and Karsh (2012) introduced the FFTT system; Tesfamariam et al. (2015) developed force-based design guideline for steel infilled with CLT shear walls, and SOM (2013) introduced the concrete jointed mass timber hybrid structural concepts. In this research, the basic structural concepts proposed by SOM (2013) is adopted. The objective of this research is to develop a wind and earthquake design guideline for concrete jointed tall mass timber buildings in scope from 10- to 40-storey office or residential buildings. The specific objective of this research is as follow: 1. Wind serviceability design guideline for hybrid mass-timber structures. 2. Calibration of design wind load factors for the serviceability wind design of hybrid tall mass timber structures. 3. Guidelines to perform probabilistic modeling, reliability assessment, and wind load factor calibration. 4. Overstrength related modification factor Ro and ductility related modification factor Rd for future implementation in the NBCC. 5. Force-based design guideline following the capacity based design principles.
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Free
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