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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Ambient Vibration Measurement Data of a Four-Story Mass Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2211
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Mugabo, Ignace
Barbosa, André
Riggio, Mariapaola
Batti, James
Publisher
Frontiers Media
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Albina Yard
Ambient Vibration Testing
Operational Modal Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Frontiers in Built Environment
ISSN
2297-3362
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Dynamic Characterization and Vibration Analysis of a Four-Story Mass Timber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2213
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Environmental Response of a CLT Floor Panel: Lessons for Moisture Management and Monitoring of Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2161
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Site Construction Management
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

How Monitoring CLT Buildings can Remove Market Barriers and Support Designers in North America: An Introduction to Preliminary Environmental Studies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2357
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Schmidt, Evan
Riggio, Mariapaola
Barbosa, Andre
Laleicke, Paul
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Portugal
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Keywords
Hygrothermal Performance
Monitoring
Structural Health
Wood-Water Relationship
SMART-CLT Project
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Revista Portuguesa de Engenharia de Estruturas
Summary
Currently, design of tall wood buildings is generally accomplished in the USA through the so-called alternate means process, with requires extensive testing, engineering analysis, and a stringent peer review process. As it pertains to cross-laminated timber (CLT), it is critical to develop effective performance prediction models, through laboratory testing elaborating on material behaviors (e.g. hygrothermal, vibrational, etc.) as well as monitoring data on the mid- to long-term performance of timber structures in situ. This paper presents the scope and preliminary outcomes of a project aiming to cross reference laboratory research and in-situ monitoring to establish a holistic performance-monitoring protocol for mass timber buildings; this protocol can later serve to define standards for mid- to long-term monitoring as well as to develop guidelines for the design of mass timber structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Hysteretic Behaviour of Metal Connectors for Hybrid (High- and Low-Grade Mixed Species) Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1659
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Mahdavifar, Vahid
Barbosa, André
Sinha, Arijit
Muszynski, Lech
Gupta, Rakesh
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Cyclic Loading
Wall-to-Floor
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3591-3598
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber that are laminated by gluing longitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid panel. Previous studies have shown that the CLT buildings can perform well in seismic loading and are recognized as the essential role of connector performance in structural design, modelling, and analysis of CLT buildings. When CLT is composed of high-grade/high-density layers for the outer lamellas and low-grade/lowdensity for the core of the panels, the CLT panels are herein designated as hybrid CLT panels as opposed to conventional CLT panels that are built using one lumber type for both outer and core lamellas. This paper presents results of a testing program developed to estimate the cyclic performance of CLT connectors applied on hybrid CLT layups. Two connectors are selected, which can be used in wall-to-floor connections. These are readily available in the North American market. Characterization of the performance of connectors is done in two perpendicular directions under a modified CUREE cyclic loading protocol. Depending on the mode of failure, in some cases, testing results indicate that when the nails or screws penetrate the low-grade/low-density core lumber, a statistically significant difference is obtained between hybrid and conventional layups. However, in other cases, due to damage in the face layer or in the connection, force-displacement results for conventional and hybrid CLT layups were not statistically significant.
Online Access
Free
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Monitored Indoor Environmental Quality of a Mass Timber Office Building: A Case Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2103
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Performance of Steel Energy Dissipators Connected to Cross-Laminated Timber Wall Panels Subjected to Tension and Cyclic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue652
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kramer, Anthonie
Barbosa, André
Sinha, Arijit
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Energy Dissipation
Digital Image Correlation
Strain Behavior
Yield Behavior
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents a new alternative energy dissipation solution to be used with cross-laminated timber (CLT) self-centering walls. CLT is a relatively new building product in North America and could potentially be used for high-rise construction. The development of high-performance seismic design solutions is necessary to encourage innovative structures and the design of these structures to new heights. The objective of this paper is to propose a wall-to-floor connection system that is easy to install and replace (structural fuse) after the occurrence of a large damaging event. The proposed energy dissipators are fabricated following concepts used in developing steel buckling restrained steel braces (BRB), having a milled portion, which is designed to yield and is enclosed within a grouted steel pipe. The connection system is investigated experimentally through a test sequence of displacement-controlled cycles based on a modified version of the test method developed by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) to facilitate development of special precast systems (ACI T1.1-01 Acceptance Criteria for Moment Frames Based on Structural Testing). Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to analyze strain behavior of the milled portion, as well as track movement of the panels during quasi-static uniaxial and cyclic testing. The results show the yield behavior and energy dissipation properties of the connection system. Damage was focused primarily in the energy dissipators, with negligible deformation and damage to the CLT panels and connections.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Assessment of a Heavy-Timber Frame Structure with Ring-Doweled Moment-Resisting Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1383
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Rodrigues, Leonardo
Branco, Jorge
Neves, Luís
Barbosa, André
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Ring-Doweled Connections
Seismic Performance
Eurocode 5
Eurocode 8
Ductility
Probabilistic Approach
Q Factor
Fragility Curves
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering
ISSN
1573-1456
Summary
The performance of heavy-timber structures in earthquakes depends strongly on the inelastic behavior of the mechanical connections. Nevertheless, the nonlinear behavior of timber structures is only considered in the design phase indirectly through the use of an R-factor or a q-factor, which reduces the seismic elastic response spectrum. To improve the estimation of this, the seismic performance of a three-story building designed with ring-doweled moment resisting connections is analyzed here. Connections and members were designed to fulfill the seismic detailing requirements present in Eurocode 5 and Eurocode 8 for high ductility class structures. The performance of the structure is evaluated through a probabilistic approach, which accounts for uncertainties in mechanical properties of members and connections. Nonlinear static analyses and multi-record incremental dynamic analyses were performed to characterize the q-factor and develop fragility curves for different damage levels. The results indicate that the detailing requirements of Eurocode 5 and Eurocode 8 are sufficient to achieve the required performance, even though they also indicate that these requirements may be optimized to achieve more cost-effective connections and members. From the obtained fragility curves, it was verified that neglecting modeling uncertainties may lead to overestimation of the collapse capacity.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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8 records – page 1 of 1.