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Characterization and Structural Performance in Bending of CLT Panels Made from Small-Diameter Logs of Loblolly/Slash Pine

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2214
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels Produced with Pine Timber from Thinnings in Uruguay

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1601
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Market and Adoption
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Baño, Vanesa
Godoy, Daniel
Vega, Abel
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Market and Adoption
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Uruguay
Pine
Finite Element Model
Strength
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1948-1955
Summary
Due to the high volume of timber required for manufacturing, the production of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels could be an appropriate destiny for the existing surplus of pinewood presently available in Uruguay. Although wood construction is uncommon in this country, there are some companies with the capacity to adapt their production to new products such as CLT. This work evaluates the properties of CLT panels manufactured in Uruguay with local pine (Pinus taeda and Pinus elliiottii) from forest plantation thinning, which typically present low mechanical properties. Boards and panels were mechanically tested and the mechanical properties were determined, showing a strength class lower than C14. A numerical model, using the finite element method, was developed and the numerical results were compared with the experimental values. The results provided a first approach to the conditions and limitations of the use of CLT panels for building floors, produced under the current manufacturing conditions in Uruguay.
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Influence of the connector shape parameters in the structural behaviour of the adhesive-free timber floor panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3125
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Application
Floors
Author
Moltini, Gonzalo
Baño, Vanesa
Organization
Universidad de la República
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive-free Connection
Structural Yield
Timber-to-timber Panels
Conference
ICSI 2021 The 4th International Conference on Structural Integrity
Research Status
Complete
Series
Procedia Structural Integrity
Summary
Timber-to-timber panels (TTPs) are adhesive- and steel-free structural components formed by carpentry joints of Scots pine to be used as floors. A numerical model simulating bending tests on TTPs and considering timber as an orthotropic and bi-modulus material was validated from experimental results of deflection, and rolling shear strength. Since the serviceability and ultimate limit states of the TTPs was mainly defined by the rolling shear properties of the connectors, this paper aims to study the influence of different connector shape parameters in the structural behavior of the panels. For that, values of the connector height (hc varying between 40 and 100 mm), width (b1 varying between 40 and 100 mm) and the dove-tail angle (a varying between 45º and 75º) were introduced in the numerical models to obtain both failure load and stiffness for different span TTPs. Results showed that TTP deflection and shear stresses on the connectors decreases with the increase of the height and the width of the connectors. As the width of the connector (b1) increases, the maximum shear stress decreases up to 42%. For a same connector height, the angle of the dove-tail shows low influence in the maximum shear stress; however, it plays a greater role in the deflection of the panels. For the connectors of 40 mm of height TTP deflection was barely influenced by connector width; however, for higher connectors (hc = 60 mm), TTP deflection decreased up to 41% as width increases. So, new TTPs configurations varying the connector parameters showed an improvement on the deflection and on the shear stresses of the connectors.
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Free
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