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Design and Performance of High-Rise Structure using Ultra-Lightweight Cross Laminated Timber Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2698
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Ahmed, Danish
Ayadat, Tahar
Asiz, Andi
Publisher
ISEC Press
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Keywords
Tall Timber Buildings
Lateral Load
Lateral Deflections
Floor Diaphragm
Language
English
Conference
International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference
Research Status
Complete
Series
Proceedings of International Structural Engineering and Construction
Summary
The main objective of this paper is to study the structural performance of a high-rise structure when alternative lightweight material known as cross-laminated timber was used as a slab in floor system in lieu of conventional reinforced concrete slab. A numerical case study was conducted using a highly irregular RC frame building with its two 60-story towers joined at the top. Three major analyses were considered. First, modeling and analyzing the building with an RC slab was conducted to determine the design reference. Second, substituting the RC slab with the CLT slab was performed using the same building skeleton. Third, redesigning and optimizing the building skeleton with that CLT to observe skeleton material saving obtained using the same structural performance criteria. Major lateral loads applicable in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were inputted. Strengths and serviceability requirements for floor diaphragm and lateral load resisting system were checked first before performing a comparative analysis between traditional RC and CLT slabs as floor diaphragm. The structural performance criteria to be used for comparative study between RC and CLT slabs included total drift, inter-story drift due to lateral loads, and base reactions. Structural periods and acceleration responses for each floor were investigated and contrasted with the existing building code. The foundation demand was also investigated based on the structural weight and reactions generated from the RC and CLT floor systems.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Finite Element Models of Effects of Moisture on Bolt Connection Properties of Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue539
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Kiwelu, Henry
Smith, Ian
Asiz, Andi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Moisture
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Moisture Content
Stiffness
Load Bearing Capacity
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Connections are critical parts of timber structures, transmitting static and dynamic forces between structural elements. Extensive experiments were conducted and detailed Finite Element (FE) models were developed. The experimental results showed that the stiffness and load-bearing capacity of the joints is reduced by post-fabrication wetting and is increased by post-fabrication drying. It was clear from those test results that changes in mechanical properties were greater than could be explained by effects moisture content changes have on material properties. Three-dimensional (3-D) continuum FE models for connection loaded parallel to grain were successfully developed based on analysis of connections having a single ½ inch (12.7 mm) or ¾ inch (19.1 mm) diameter bolt. The model included the nonlinearity of material and contact analysis between wood and steel and revealed that the connection capacity can be well predicted by using FE techniques.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail