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Ambient Vibration Testing and Modal Analysis of Multi-Storey Cross Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue237
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Wind
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Vessby, Johan
Chang, Wen-Shao
Harris, Richard
Bawcombe, Jonathan
Bregulla, Julie
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Wind
Serviceability
Keywords
Modal Properties
Multi-Storey
Damping
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The ambient movement of three modern multi-storey timber buildings has been measured and used to determine modal properties. This information, obtained by a simple, unobtrusive series of tests, can give insights into the structural performance of these forms of building, as well as providing information for the design of future, taller timber buildings for dynamic loads. For two of the buildings, the natural frequency has been related to the lateral stiffness of the structure, and compared with that given by a simple calculation. In future tall timber buildings, a new design criterion is expected to become important: deflection and vibration serviceability under wind load. For multi-storey timber buildings there is currently no empirical basis to estimate damping for calculation of wind-induced vibration, and there is little information for stiffness under wind load. This study therefore presents a method to address those gaps in knowledge.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Effect of Flexible Supports on Vibration Performance of Timber Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue190
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Jarnerö, Kirsi
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Brandt, Anders
Olsson, Anders
Organization
Euronoise
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Czech Republic
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Residential
Multi-Storey
Noise
Prefabrication
In Situ
Vibration
Damping
Interlayer
Language
English
Conference
Ninth European Conference on Noise Control (Euronoise)
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 10-13, 2012, Prague, Czech Republic
Summary
In residential multi-storey buildings of timber it is of great importance to reduce the flanking transmission of noise. Some building systems do this by installing a vibration-damping elastic interlayer, Sylomer or Sylodyn , in the junction between the support and the floor structure. This interlayer also improves the floor vibration performance by adding damping to the structure. In the present work the vibration performance of a floor with such interlayers has been investigated both in laboratory and field tests. A prefabricated timber floor element was tested in laboratory on rigid supports and on supports with four different types of interlayers. The results are compared with in situ tests on a copy of the same floor element. The effect on vibration performance i.e. frequencies, damping ratio and mode shapes is studied. A comparison of the in situ test and the test with elastic interlayer in laboratory shows that the damping in situ is approximately three times higher than on a single floor element in the lab. This indicates that the damping in situ is affected be the surrounding building structure. The achieved damping ratio is highly dependent on the mode shapes. Mode shapes that have high mode shape coefficients along the edges where the interlayer material is located, result in higher modal damping ratios. The impulse velocity response, that is used to evaluate the vibration performance and rate experienced annoyance in the design of wooden joist floors, seems to be reduced when adding elastic layers at the supports.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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