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Reduced and test-data correlated FE-models of a large timber truss with dowel-type connections aimed for dynamic analyses at serviceability level

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3004
Year of Publication
2022
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Trusses
Author
Landel, Pierre
Linderholt, Andreas
Organization
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden
Linnaeus University
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2022
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Trusses
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Serviceability
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Tall Timber Structures
Mechanical Connection
Dowel-type Fastener
Wind-induced Vibration
Modal Testing Properties
Connection Stiffness
FE-Model Reduction
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engineering Structures
Summary
The rise of wood buildings in the skylines of cities forces structural dynamic and timber experts to team up to solve one of the new civil-engineering challenges, namely comfort at the higher levels, in light weight buildings, with respect to wind-induced vibrations. Large laminated timber structures with mechanical joints are exposed to turbulent horizontal excitation with most of the wind energy blowing around the lowest resonance frequencies of 50 to 150 m tall buildings. Good knowledge of the spatial distribution of mass, stiffness and damping is needed to predict and mitigate the sway in lighter, flexible buildings. This paper presents vibration tests and reductions of a detailed FE-model of a truss with dowel-type connections leading to models that will be useful for structural engineers. The models also enable further investigations about the parameters of the slotted-in steel plates and dowels connections governing the dynamical response of timber trusses.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Stability and Dynamic Properties of Tall Timber Structures - A parametric study of the structural response due to wind action

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue3096
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Wind
Author
Alalwan, Ahmad
Larsson, Joakim
Organization
Chalmers University of Technology
Year of Publication
2019
Format
Thesis
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Dynamic Response
Human Occupancy
Tall Timber Structure
Wind-induced Vibration
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The interest in building taller structures in timber is increasing in the building sector. However, the high strength-to-weight ratio of timber leads to a relatively light structure which is often associated with vibrations. The dynamic properties are essential in the design of tall timber structures, where wind-induced vibrations of the building in service state is addressed. The dynamic response is influenced by mass, stiffness and damping. These parameters influence the acceleration of the building which can be perceived as a discomfort for human occupancy. The aim is to find a structural concept that makes a taller structure than the usual today feasible. The objective is to make a parametric study and investigate how a multi-storey residential building of timber can be optimized with respect to dynamic wind loading. With a combination of numerical and analytical methods, accelerations are calculated and evaluated against the criteria for human comfort according to ISO 10137 and ISO 6897. An analytical calculation sheet is set up according to SS-EN-1991-1-4 and EKS 10 to define wind-induced acceleration. Starting from a beam-column structure with a central core, the effect of adding inner walls and exterior bracing is studied to see what limits the number of storeys for an open plan building. Analysis of the dynamic response due to wind shows the fundamental mode shape in torsion before exterior bracing is added. Results have shown that the structure can reach 5-storeys with inner walls of cross-laminated timber and 4-storeys with no walls. Moreover, it’s found that diagonal bracing in the facades improves the torsional stiffness significantly and the fundamental mode becomes a transversal mode. An outrigger bracing system has been found to be the most efficient, leading to a structure of 12-storeys. The parameters mass and stiffness are modified by adding concrete floors and assigning larger sections to the structure. Results show that the building can achieve 15-storeys with pure timber and 21-storeys when concrete floors are added. Secondary parametric action i.e. adding another outrigger generates a gain of one-storey and modifying the truss-work to steel gives a structure of 23-storeys.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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