Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Behaviour of Multi-Storey Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings Under Lateral Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2715
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Hughes, Claire
Publisher
Queen's University Belfast
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loading
Tall Wood
Tall Timber Buildings
Connections
Monotonic Loading Tests
Constant Vertical Load
Wall Systems
Experimental Tests
Analytical Approach
Multi-Storey
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In response to the global drive towards sustainable construction, CLT has emerged as a competitive alternative to other construction materials. CLT buildings taller than 10-storeys and CLT buildings in regions of moderate to high seismicity would be subject to higher lateral loads due to wind and earthquakes than CLT buildings which have already been completed. The lack of structural design codes and limited literature regarding the performance of CLT buildings under lateral loading are barriers to the adoption of CLT for buildings which could experience high lateral loading. Previous research into the behaviour of CLT buildings under lateral loading has involved testing of building components. These studies have generally been limited to testing wall systems and connections which replicate configurations at ground floor storeys in buildings no taller than three storeys. Consequently, to develop the understanding of the performance of multi-storey CLT buildings under lateral loading, the performance of wall systems and connections which replicate conditions of those in above ground floor storeys in buildings taller than three storeys were experimentally investigated. The testing of typical CLT connections involved testing eighteen configurations under cyclic loading in shear and tension. The results of this experimental investigation highlighted the need for capacity-based design of CLT connections to prevent brittle failure. It was found that both hold down and angle bracket connections have strength and stiffness in shear and tension and by considering the strength of the connections in both directions, more economical design of CLT buildings could be achieved. The testing of CLT wall systems involved testing three CLT wall systems with identical configurations under monotonic lateral load and constant vertical load, with vertical loads replicating gravity loads at storeys within a 10-storey CLT building. The results show that vertical load has a significant influence on wall system behaviour; varying the vertical load was found to vary the contribution of deformation mechanisms to global behaviour within the elastic region, reinforcing the need to consider connection design at each individual storey. As there are still no structural design codes for CLT buildings, the accuracy of analytical methods presented within the literature for predicting the behaviour of CLT connections and wall systems under lateral loading was assessed. It was found that the analytical methods for both connections and wall systems are highly inaccurate and do not reflect experimentally observed behaviour.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Experimental Testing of Load-Bearing Timber–Glass Composite Shear Walls and Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue860
Year of Publication
2015
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Shear Walls
Beams
Author
Kozlowski, Marcin
Dorn, Michael
Serrano, Erik
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Shear Walls
Beams
Keywords
Shear Loading
Vertical Loading
Adhesives
Four Point Bending Test
Load Carrying Capacity
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Material Science & Engineering
Summary
The paper presents results from the experimental testing of load-bearing timber–glass composite shear walls and beams. Shear wall specimens measuring 1200 × 2400 mm2 manufactured with three adhesives of varying stiffness were tested. Twelve specimens with a single 10 mm thick glass pane and one specimen with an additional insulating glass unit were produced. The testing procedures involved various loading conditions: pure vertical load and different combinations of shear and vertical loading. The test results showed that the adhesive had only a minor influence on the buckling load which was the main failure mechanism. 240 mm high and 4800 mm long timber–glass beams manufactured with adhesives of different stiffness were tested. For the webs, two types of glass were used: annealed float and heat-strengthened glass, in both cases 8 mm thick panes were used. In total, 12 beams were tested in four-point bending until failure. Despite the considerable difference in adhesive stiffness, beam bending stiffness was similar. Concerning load-bearing capacity, the beams with heat-strengthened glass were approximately 50% stronger than the beams made using annealed float glass.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Lateral-Load Resistance of Cross-Laminated Timber Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1238
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Reynolds, Thomas
Foster, Robert
Bregulla, Julie
Chang, Wen-Shao
Harris, Richard
Ramage, Michael
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2017
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Vertical Load
Lateral Load
Pullout Tests
Steel Connectors
Offset-Yield Criterion
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
Cross-laminated timber shear wall systems are used as a lateral load resisting system in multistory timber buildings. Walls at each level typically bear directly on the floor panels below and are connected by nailed steel brackets. Design guidance for lateral load resistance of such systems is not well established and design approaches vary among practitioners. Two cross-laminated two-story timber shear wall systems are tested under vertical and lateral load, along with pull-out tests on individual steel connectors. Comprehensive kinematic behavior is obtained from a combination of discrete transducers and continuous field displacements along the base of the walls, obtained by digital image correlation, giving a measure of the length of wall in contact with the floor below. Existing design approaches are evaluated. A new offset-yield criterion based on acceptable permanent deformations is proposed. A lower bound plastic distribution of stresses, reflecting yielding of all connectors in tension and cross-grain crushing of the floor panel, is found to most accurately reflect the observed behavior.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Seismic Analysis of Cross-Laminated Multistory Timber Buildings Using Code-Prescribed Methods: Influence of Panel Size, Connection Ductility, and Schematization

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue566
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sustersic, Iztok
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Dujic, Bruno
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Multi-Story
FE Analysis
Geometry
Vertical Load
Friction
Stiffness
Strength
Ductility
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents the results of an experimental study whose objective was to investigate the behavior of a hybrid wood shear-wall system defined herein as a combination of traditional light-frame wood shear walls with post-tensioned rocking Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. The post-tensioned CLT panels in the hybrid system offer both vertical and lateral load resistance and self-centering capacities. The traditional Light-Frame Wood Systems (LiFS) provide additional lateral load resistance along with a large amount of energy dissipation through the friction of nail connections. Thus, a combination of these two types of structures, in which traditional light-frame wood shearwalls are utilized as structural partition walls, may provide an excellent structural solution for mid-rise to tall wood buildings for apartments/condos, where there is a need for resisting large lateral and vertical loads as well as structural stability. In this study, a real-time hybrid testing algorithm using a combination of time-delay updating and Newmark-Beta feed forward to reduce the undesirable effects of time delay was introduced. The top two-stories of a three-story building were modeled as a numerical substructure with the first story as the experimental CLT-LiFS substructure. The experimental results of the hybrid wall are presented and discussed in this paper.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Seismic Analysis of Cross Laminated Timber Buildings Using Code Prescribed Methods

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1646
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sustersic, Iztok
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Dujic, Bruno
Year of Publication
2016
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
FE Analysis
Multi-Story
Geometry
Vertical Load
Friction
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3453-3461
Summary
This paper investigates the seismic analysis of multi-story cross laminated timber (XLAM) buildings. The influence of different parameters such as wall geometry, vertical load level, friction and, most importantly, connection stiffness, strength and ductility is assessed. Linear and nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses are carried out on a hypothetic four-story case study building. The XLAM building behaviour factors are derived for different cases using a simplified method. Values in the range of 2 to 3 have been obtained depending on whether monolithic or segmental walls are used. Further nonlinear dynamic analyses carried out on a part of the case study building show that friction may have a beneficial effect on the seismic resistance of XLAM buildings. However it is advised that its influence is conservatively neglected until further investigations are performed. Obtained results provide an important insight for both academics and practicing engineers into the FE modelling and design of XLAM buildings using different code-based approaches. This data is also crucial for the preparation of new seismic design codes on XLAM timber buildings.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Study on Compressive Strain of CLT Wall Bottom Under the Extreme Verical Load

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1004
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Oonishi, Satoshi
Nasu, Hideyuki
Karube, Yasuteru
Inayama, Masahiro
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Vertical Load
High-Rise
Reinforcement
Screws
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
High-rise building made of CLT increases significantly its own weight. Therefore, the collapse of the wall bottom is concerned. Main purpose of this study is to verify the effect of the reinforcement with screws for avoiding the collapse of the CLT wall bottom by extreme vertical load. Test pieces of CLT wall bottom were reinforced by screws. As a result, we got better structural result with screw reinforcement than without screw. From these experimental results, the reinforcement of CLT wall bottom using screw at perpendicular angle to the fiber direction is effective in workability because it does not need seat-dig hole.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.