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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Determining Optimised H3 LOSP Treatment Options for Decay Protection in Softwood Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1930
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Cookson, Laurie
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
LOSP
CCA
TBTN
Treated Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research was to examine the LOSP treatment options available for H3 exposed glulam of Pinus radiata and P. elliottii. Test specimens were treated before or after gluing with azole LOSP, while some were treated with TBTN or CCA for comparison. They were then exposed at Innisfail or in an Accelerated Field Simulator (AFS) designed to give severe exposure and accelerated results. After 3.1–3.2 years, test specimens were given a performance rating from a scale of 8 (sound) to 0 (destroyed by decay). The results suggest that treating glulam before gluing will generally give better performance than treatment after gluing. Decay was more rapid in vertically exposed than horizontally exposed specimens, suggesting that glulam posts need special attention to prevent water penetration. End grain sealants based on copper naphthenate or zinc naphthenate gave improved decay resistance, but on their own were insufficient for post end protection. This suggests that a better approach would be to include barriers (caps) as well, or to use designs where the end is not exposed to rain or can drain away readily.
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Development Of CLT Products with Improved Fire Performance

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2598
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
He, Guangbo
Feng, Martin
Roussiere, Fabrice
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Fire Resistance
Adhesives
Bond Durability
Bonding
Treated Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The fire resistance of cross-laminated timber (CLT) could be improved by treating the lamina with fire retardants. The major issues with this technology are the reduced bondability of the treated lamina with commercial adhesives. This study assessed several surface preparation methods that could improve the bondability and bond durability of fire-retardant treated wood with two commercial adhesives. Four surface preparation methods, including moisture/heat/pressure, surface planing, surface chemical treatment, and surface plasma treatment were assessed for their impact on the bondability and bond durability of lodgepole pine lamina. The block shear test results indicated that all surface preparation methods were somewhat effective in improving bond performance of fire-retardant treated wood compared to the untreated control wood samples, depending on the types of fire retardants and wood adhesives applied in the treatment process and bonding process. The selection of surface preparation, fire retardant, and wood adhesive should be considered interactively to obtain the best bond properties and fire performance. It may be possible to effectively bond the treated lamina with PUR adhesive without any additional surface preparation for the fire retardant used in the treatment at FPInnovations.
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Influence of the Treatment Phase on the Gluing Performance of Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2578
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)

Ongoing Field Evaluation of Douglas-fir Cross-Laminated Timber in a Ground Proximity Protected Test in Mississippi

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1958
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Mankowski, Mark
Shelton, Thomas
Kirker, Grant
Morrell, Jeffrey
Year of Publication
2018
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Douglas-Fir
Treated Wood
Termites
Conference
American Wood Protection Association
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Current design standards incorporate the use of preservative treated and naturally durable wood where conditions are suitable for deterioration, but treatment options for mass timber products, particularly, cross laminated timber (CLT) remain to be addressed. Termiticide treatment is a necessity for CLT structures, especially in southeastern climates. Wood species currently used to fabricate CLT are non-durable, and current design standards do not properly address incorporation of preservative treatments into these systems. In this study, 12” x 14” x 4” Douglas-fir CLT pieces were installed in a ground proximity protected test at the Harrison Experimental Forest (HEF), (Saucier, MS). Test samples were placed in sets of two in 30” x 30” subplots on bricks approximately 3-4” above soil and covered with ventilated waterproof covers. A total of 20 test pairs (40 total samples) with four different treatments were installed. The treatments consisted of a soil termiticide treatment, a preventive borate spray treatment at initiation, a remedial treatment with the spray-on borate one year post initiation and untreated controls. Soil below five pairs of samples was treated the with a soil termiticide (Termidor® SC). For the preventive borate at initiation treatment, one sample per pair of five other sets was treated with a spray-on borate preventative treatment (Bora-Care®). The remaining ten pairs were left as untreated controls. Temperature and humidity inside some of the covered units is being monitored throughout the test. The ten control sets will be examined for termite attack 12 months after installation. Five of the attacked sets will be treated with spray-on borate as a remedial treatment for active termite attack.
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Performance of Borate-Treated Glulam and LVL After Eight Years in an Accelerated Above-Ground Field Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue359
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Ingram, Janet
Morris, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Decay
Treated Wood
Borate
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Glulam and laminated veneer lumber protected by a combination of treatment with borate by two processes, and a film-forming coating, were exposed outdoors in an above-ground field test using a modified post and rail test design. After eight years’ exposure, early to moderate decay was found in untreated test units, while those which were borate-treated by either method were generally sound up to six years and showed greatly reduced decay at eight years.
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Performance of Preservative-Treated Glulam After Six Years in an Accelerated Above-Ground Field Test

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue360
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Ingram, Janet
Morris, Paul
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2015
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Decay
Preservative
Treated Wood
ACQ
CCA
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Glulam manufactured from laminating stock of three species pre-treated with ACQ-D or CA was exposed outdoors in an above-ground field test using a modified post and rail test design. After six years’ exposure, early to moderate decay was found in untreated test units, while those which were preservative-treated were completely sound.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.