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Design Concept for a Greened Timber Truss Bridge in City Area

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2392
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Kromoser, Benjamin
Ritt, Martin
Spitzer, Alexandra
Stangl, Rosemarie
Idam, Friedrich
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Wooden Trusses
Timber Bridges
Timber Engineering
Greened Structures
Vertical Green
Sustainable Structural Engineering
Digital Design
Parametric Design
Automated Construction
Resource-Efficient Structural Engineering
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
Summary
Properly designed wooden truss bridges are environmentally compatible construction systems. The sharp decline in the erection of such structures in the past decades can be led back to the great effort needed for design and production. Digital parametric design and automated prefabrication approaches allow for a substantial improvement of the efficiency of design and manufacturing processes. Thus, if combined with a constructive wood protection following traditional building techniques, highly efficient sustainable structures are the result. The present paper describes the conceptual design for a wooden truss bridge drawn up for the overpass of a two-lane street crossing the university campus of one of Vienna’s main universities. The concept includes the greening of the structure as a shading design element. After an introduction, two Austrian traditional wooden bridges representing a good and a bad example for constructive wood protection are presented, and a state of the art of the production of timber trusses and greening building structures is given as well. The third part consists of the explanation of the boundary conditions for the project. Subsequently, in the fourth part, the conceptual design, including the design concept, the digital parametric design, the optimization, and the automated prefabrication concept, as well as the potential greening concept are discussed, followed by a summary and outlook on future research.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Experimental Investigation on Long-term Axial Creep Performance of Pine, Spotted Gum and Laminated Veneer Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2485
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Structural Timber Design in Curricula of Canadian Universities: Current Status and Future Needs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2879
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
General Information
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Daneshvar, Hossein
Goni, Tahiat
Zhang, Sigong
Kelterborn, Reed
Chui, Ying Hei
Organization
University of Alberta
University of Exeter
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
General Information
Keywords
Education
Timber Engineering
Sustainability
Survey
Decision Matrix
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Education Sciences
Summary
Due to the efficiency, sustainability, and advances in firefighting technologies, the allowable height for wood buildings was increased from 4 to 6 storeys in 2015 and will be further increased to 12 storeys in the 2020 edition of the National Building Code of Canada, as a result of the advent and application of mass timber products. To match the development in the industry and the increasing need in the market for highly skilled timber engineers, structural timber design curricula at the university level must evolve to train the next generation of practitioners. At most Canadian universities, structural timber design courses are mainly provided in civil engineering departments. In this study, 31 accredited civil engineering programs in Canada were reviewed for structural wood design content at undergraduate and graduate levels based on two surveys conducted in 2018 and 2020. In the 2018 survey, the percentage of structural timber design content was estimated and compared with other engineering materials (e.g., steel, concrete, and masonry), and a similar survey was repeated in 2020 to determine if any significant changes had occurred. In early 2021, two complementary questionnaires were sent to the instructors of timber-related courses across the country to collect quantitative information, including enrollment statistics, percentage dedicated to timber design in combined material courses, and potential topics deemed critical to support the design of modern timber structures. Based on the responses provided, and also on the availability of resources and the research ongoing, the content for five advanced-level courses is proposed to address the needs of the timber design community. The findings presented in this paper will assist the timber industry, government agencies, and educational institutions in effecting potential changes to university curricula to educate the next generation of timber design professionals who will possess the necessary skills and knowledge to meet the challenges in designing modern mass timber structures.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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